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Full text of "Annual reports, Town of Acton, Massachusetts"

For Reference 

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ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 




/REFERENCE BOOK 
ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS 0172D 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportstow19651969acto 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



incorporated as a Town: July 3, 1735 

Type of Government Town Meeting-Selectmen 

Location: - Eastern Massachusetts, Middlesex County, bordered on the east by 

Carlisle and Concord, on the west by Boxborough, on the north by 
Westford and Littleton, on the south by Sudbury, and on the south- 
west by Stow and Maynard. 

Name: Acton as the name of our Town has several possible derivations: 

the old Saxon word Ac-tun meaning oak settlement or hamlet in 
the oaks, the Town of Acton, England, the Acton family of England, 
a member of which supposedly offered a bell for the first meeting 
house in 1735. 

Elevation at Town Hall 268' above mean sea level. 

Land Area: Approximately 20 square miles. 

Population: Year Persons Density 

1910 2136 106 per sq. mi. 

1950 3510 175 

1955 4681 233 

1960 7238 361 

1965 10188 507 

Climate: Normal January temperature 27.7 F. 

Normal July temperature 72.0 F. 

Normal annual precipitation 43.02 inches. 

Public Education: Pupil enrollment (December, 1 965): 

Grades 1-6, 1851; Grades 7-12, 1324 (regional) 
Number of teachers and adminstrative staff: 141 
Pupil-teacher ratio: Elementary - 1/32 

Junior and Senior High - 1/22 
Expenditure per pupil: 

Elementary - Net $267.28 Gross $336.52 
(See Regional Report for Grades 7-12.) 
Teachers salaries: 

Degree Min. Max. 

B.a! $5^0. $7,800. 

M.A. 5,400. 8,500. 

M.A. plus 30 hrs. 5,700. 8,800. 

Beg. Sept., 1966: B.A. 5,500. 8,400. 

M.A. 5,900. 9,500. 

M.A. plus 30 hrs. 6,200. 9,800. 

Tax Picture I;.'.., Year , Tox Rate Assessed Valuation 

1962 ' $82. $14,168,525 

1963 83. 15,799,455 

1964 86. 17,207,395 

1965 92. 18,408,058 
United States Senators in Congress Leverett Saltonstoll (R), Dover, Massachusetts 

Edward M. Kennedy (D), Boston, Massachusetts 

Representative in Congress, 3rd Congressional District: Philip J. Philbin (D), Clinton, Massachusetts 

State Senator, Middlesex and Worcester District William I. Randall, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Representative, General Court, 13th Middlesex District: John M. Eaton, Jr., Concord, Massachusetts 

Governor's Council, 3rd District > George F. Cronin, Jr., Boston, Massachusetts 



Town Office (Selectmen, Clerk) 

Treasurer and Collector 

Assessors 

School Superintendent 

Board of Health 

Veterans' Agent 

Library Hours: Memorial Library 

Citizens, W. Acton 



OFFICE HOURS 

9-4:30 (Tues. 7:30 p.m.) 

8-5 

8-5 

8-4:30 

8-5 

No Regular Hours 

Mon.-Fri., 1-9 p.m. 

Saturday, 10-6 p.m. 

Mon., 7-9 p.m., Tues., 3-6 p.m. 

Thurs., 3-5 p.m. 



Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

A-B Regional H. S. 

Town Hall 

At Home 



263-2761 
263-7018 
263-5012 
263-5737 
263-4736 
263-4757 
263-2232 



(Cover stock donated by Hollingsworth and Vose Company, East Walpole, Massachusetts) 



ANNUAL REPORTS 




TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS (^fim^aA 

FOR ITS 
TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTIETH ^^^^f^ ^ 

MUNICIPAL YEAR 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER THIRTY-FIRST 



1 965 



Cover Sketch by Joanne Noyes 



Photographs courtesy of 

Assabet Valley Beacon 

and 

Acton Enterprise 

Photographers 



FREEDOMS FOUNDATION AWARD 
The George Washington Honor Medal 




To The Townspeople of Acton, Massachusetts 

for Outstanding Achievement in 

Bringing About a Better Understanding 

of the American Way of Life 



The Medal with $100 cash was awarded for the 1964 Patriots Day Program. 
The Award, in national competition with hundreds of community patriotic activities, 
was made based on two books of words, pictures, letters fromi participants, memo- 
rabilia, and newspaper clippings prepared by a committee including Mrs. Edward 
Noyes, Mrs. Thomas Silverberg, Miss Florence Merriam, Mrs. Raymond Shamel, 
Mrs. Robert Wylie, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Walsh, John Tierney, Mrs. Robert Hunt, 
and Raymond Shamel, Chairman. Mrs. Noyes and Mrs. Silverberg provided all art- 
work. Phrasing, captions, and organization were by Raymond Shamel. The books 
were judged by a distinguished jury of Justices of the Supremie Courts and leaders of 
national patriotic organizations. The Acton Award Books are permanently on display 
at Freedoms Foundation Library at Valley Forge available to the public and espe- 
cially to students of the American Heritage. 

Freedoms Foundation is a nonprofit, nonsectarian, nonpartisan, independent 
organization whose purpose is to quicken our awareness of the worth of the American 
Way of Life, maintain it against all threats, and pass it on intact to succeeding gen- 
erations. This is accomplished through national recognition awards, radio and tele- 
vision, teacher training, the development of the Freedonns Foundation Library and 
other suitable programs. DwightD. Eisenhower is Chairman and Dr. Kenneth D. Wells 
is President of Freedoms Foundation. Distinguished Americans from all walks of life 
are active in the organization. Acton is truly honored by this outstanding Award. 



m.y:4 f/: 





Selectman Warren Birch receives Freedoms Foundation 
Award for the Town of Acton from Gen. VanOrden. 



«9^ 



The Peter Gray Flag raised 
by Peter Gray IV. 





Chairman Ray Shamel, aided by Dorothy Shamel and 
Artist Constance Silverberg, select material for a 
Freedoms Award Book. 




Mrs. Edward Noyes - artist - 
displays Freedoms Foundation 
Award Scrap Book. 



Raymond A. Shamel presents Patriot of the Year 
Award to Mr. and Mrs. Albert Jenks. 



PUBLIC CEREMONIES 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Committee is pleased and proud that in 1965 Acton received national distinction and 
recognition for its 1964 Patriots Day Program through the award of the George Washington Honor 
Medal and Cash Award presented to the Town of Acton by Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge on 
April 19th, 1965. This honor was made possible by the wholehearted, town-wide participation of 
many organizations and individuals who generously contributed their time, talents, and expenses. 
We are indeed grateful, and congratulate all those who assisted and participated, upon the success 
of their efforts in bringing this distinction to our beloved and historic town. 

The highlights of our activities in 1965 were as follows: 

PATRIOTS DAY PROGRAM 

6:30 p.m. April 11, 1965 - Acton Historical Society Program. Speakers from Acton, Bed- 
ford, Boxborough, Groton, Lancaster, Littleton, and Stow each telling each town's participation in 
the events of April 19, 1775. 

6:30 p.m. April 18, 1965 - The fourth reenactment of the Dr. Prescott - John Robbins ride 
was presented at 6:30 p.m. rather than the historic midnight hour so that Acton's youngest citizens 
could witness this colorful and exciting event. Dr. Seymour A. DiMare, portraying Dr. Prescott, 
galloped to the homesite of Minuteman Captain Robbins on Old Concord Road bringing the first 
alarm to Acton, "Captain Robbins, Captain Robbins, the Regulars are coming! " Young John Robbins 
who was just thirteen years old that day, as portrayed by William Rodday, II, quickly mounted and 
gallopped off to take the alarm to the Captain Davis home and then on to the Captain Simon Hunt home 
--Acton's famous Liberty Tree House. 

In the meantime, "Dr. Prescott" carried the alarm to the Colonel Faulkner home before 
joining the 1965 festivities at the Liberty Tree House. At each house as the messenger departed, 
present-day Acton Minutemen in colonial uniform fired three quick flintlock signal shots which 
echoed across the countryside just as in 1775! The present owner of The Liberty Tree House, 
Marguerite White, served delicious refreshments and hot coffee to the record-breaking crowd 
including large numbers of children, who followed the reenactment of this historic Acton ride. Mrs. 
White also provided refreshments to the many visiting Boy Scouts who were tented down for the 
night in the three inches of wet snow that covered the area. 

6:00 a.m. April 19, 1965 - Acton's celebration of Patriots Day centers around the retracing 
of the Line of March of the Acton Minutemen of 1775 who, under the command of Captain Isaac Davis, 
left the Davis homesite on April 19th, 1775 at 6:45 a.m. and marched to the Muster Field at Concord 
near the Old North Bridge. Here Captain Isaac Davis's immortal words, "I haven't a man that is 
afraid to go." resulted in the placing of the Acton Minutemen at the head of the line which met the 
British at the Old North Bridge and returned their fire with the "shot heard 'round the world" in the 
first successful organized military resistance to the British arms, and the beginning of the American 
Revolution. 

Highlights of the 6 a.m. program were martial music by the Acton-Boxborough Regional High 
School Band, Constantine Limberakis, directing; the Peter Gray Flag raised by Peter Gray, IV 
accompanied by Mrs. Peter Gray, III; placing of Wreath honoring Captain Isaac Davis and the 1775 
Minutemen by Cmdr. Norman Gilbert, Post #284 of the American Legion; prayer by the Reverend 
Robert T. Dick (Unitarian Universalist Church); Flintlock Musket Salute by Acton Minutemen, Col. 
Walter Johnson commanding; retracing of the Line of March of the Acton Minutemen to the Old 
North Bridge. 

6:30 a.m. Program at Acton Center - The President Kennedy Memorial Flag (one of five 
which flew at half-mast over the White House for 30 days following the death of the President) raised 
by Cynthia and Tamara Loring representing The Children of the American Revolution; placing of 
Wreath by Miss Therese Wall, 1965 recipient of the DAR Good Citizenship Award. (The wreath is 
placed in honor and memory of Captain Isaac Davis, James Hayward, and Abner Hosmer of the 
Acton Minutemen who gave their lives in the service of our country.); prayer by the Reverend David 



Y. Hirano, (West Acton Baptist Church); Flintlock Musket Salute by the Acton Minute Men; Patriots 
Day Address and presentation of Freedoms Foundation George Washington Honor Medal and Cash 
Award by Brig. General George O. Van Orden, USMC, Retired, Vice-President Freedoms Founda- 
tion; response by Warren Birch, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen; presentation of George 
Washington Medal to R. A. Shamel by General Van Orden; presentation of George Washington Honor 
Medal Lapel Pins to Mrs. Robert Hunt, Raymond Shamel, and, at the special request of Mrs. 
Dwight D. Eisenhower, to Mrs. Raymond Shamel, by General Van Orden; presentation by the Acton 
Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee of Framed Prints of the Captain Isaac Davis - 
Minutemen Picture to Mrs. Edward Noyes and to Mrs. Thomas Silverberg in recognition of artwork 
in Acton's Freedoms Foundation Award Books; presentation of the First Acton Patriot of the Year 
Award to Mr. and Mrs. Albert Jenks; continuation of Pilgrimage to the Old North Bridge to music 
of The White Cockade by Minute Man fife and drum and the ABRHS Band. The Sudbury Minute Men 
joined us at the Barrett's Mill Farm. On April 19, 1775, Sudbury supplied the largest contingent 
of Minute Men and Militia to the fight at Meriams Corners in Concord. 

9:05 a.m. Muster Field - We were joined by the U. S. Marines Honor Guard under Captain 
Collins, and by marchers from Carlisle. The Shot Heard 'Round the World fired by the Acton 
Minute Men; the Death of Captain Isaac Davis symbolized by Taps; Pilgrimage to the Old North 
Bridge. We joined Concord's Celebration, Representative Brad Morse, speaker; presentation of 
Freedoms Foundation Honorable Mention to Concord for their 1964 Patriots Day Program, by Gen- 
eral George O. Van Orden. 

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. - Scrolls awarded at Town Hall by Captain Isaac Davis Chapter, DAR; 
2 p.m. to 5 p.m. -Patriot of the Year Reception at the Acton Woman's Club; 2:30 p.m. - Acton 
Memorial Library 75th Birthday Party and Groundbreaking Ceremony. A copy of "A Day of Glory" 
was given to Acton children ages 8 to 15 inclusive. 

1 p.m. to 5 p.m. - Acton Open House with the following exhibits: At the Acton Memorial 
Library - The Kennedy Inaugural Bible displayed by T. Acton Fitzgerald, uncle of the late President 
and son of Acton's Josephine Hannon and the famous "Honey Fitz" Fitzgerald, Mayor of Boston. 
Josephine Hannon was the only woman ever to see her grandson inaugurated as President of the U.S. 
At the Acton Women's Club - Antiques of early Acton displayed by their owners and by the Acton 
Historical Society. Iron Works Farms open 1 to 5 p.m., on Main Street, South Acton. This historic 
17th century building recently saved from destruction is now in the first stages of restoration under 
the direction of Robert Nylander, expert architectural historian. 

5 p.m. at the Prudential Center. Announcement of Area Freedoms Foundation Awards by 
General George O. Van Orden and presentation of Awards by Governor John A. Volpe, including 
presentation of George Washington Honor Medal to R. A. Shamel. 

8 p.m. - The Third Annual Captain Isaac Davis Ball, in Blanchard Auditorium, with Ira 
Smith, Chairman, sponsored by the Acton Lions Club, the Public Ceremonies and Celebrations 
Committee, and the Acton Minutemen. A program entitled "Flags of Acton's Men" depicted the 
evolution of our flag under which Acton men fought and lived. The program was written and directed 
by Carl Hedin. The Ball was a wonderful, gala conclusion to Acton's Patriots Day Program. Pro- 
ceeds were donated to the Acton Lions Club Educational Fund providing for scholarships and the 
ABRHS Science Fair Awards. 

PATRIOT OF THE YEAR AWARD 

Inaugurated in 1965 as a recognition of outstanding good citizenship, achievement, and ser- 
vice to the community, this award while honoring a specific person is intended to direct our atten- 
tion and appreciation to the many good citizens who serve in local, state or national sphere whose 
achievements and contributions are outstanding. 

COMMEMORATING ACTON'S FREEDOM FOUNDATION AWARD 

Special Cancellation of Mail - Through the splendid cooperation of Postmaster Richard 
O'Neil, the U. S. Post Office Department granted the use of a special cancellation of postage at all 
three Acton postoffices. Postmaster O'Neil also obtained a large supply of five cent denomination 
U. S. Flag postage stamps to further attract attention to our special cancellation and our Freedoms 
Foundation Award. The same "Freedoms Foundation George Washington Medal Award 1965" can- 
cellation was purchased and used by Acton's several postage meter holders. There were approxi- 
mately 1,200,000 pieces of mail sent from Acton from April 19th, 1965 until December 31st, 1965 
which carried the announcement of our Freedoms Foundation Award to all corners of the world. 



The Postmaster also reported that he had 600 to 700 requests for this special cancellation from 
collectors all over the United States. 

Commemorative Envelopes - Two types of special commemorative envelopes, designed by 
Carl Hedin, assisted by Mrs. Edward Noyes were made available. A limited number of these, with 
the American Flag Stamp and Freedoms Foundation April 19th Cancellation were carried over the 
Isaac Davis Trail by Acton Minutemen. These were so marked and initialed by the Minutemen who 
carried the envelope. These have become a valued collectors item. 

Commemorative Seals - A beautiful commemorative seal combining the announcement of 
Acton's Freedoms Foundation Award with the Captain Isaac Davis -Minutemen picture, was created 
by Mrs. Edward Noyes. These seals in booklets of 50 seals were made available for use on envel- 
opes and stationery and for other uses. These are still available for your use. 

The Captain Isaac Davis -Minutemen Picture - This picture of Captain Isaac Davis and the 
Acton Minutemen as they left Captain Isaac Davis' home for the fight at the Old North Bridge, as 
painted by Arthur Davis, was reproduced in color and sold by the Acton Minutemen in commemora- 
tion of Acton's Freedoms Foundation Award. The reproduction was made with the permission of 
the Board of Directors of the Acton Memorial Library. 

Freedom Foundation Award Books - These two beautiful, prize-winning Scrap Books were 
on display at the Acton Memorial Library for several weeks following Patriots Day. They were 
then returned to the Freedoms Foundation Library at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania where they may 
be seen by visitors from all over the world forever more. 

MEMORIAL DAY PROGRAM 

Prior to Memorial Day the Committee purchased geraniums and flags for all Veterans' 
graves in all Acton Cemeteries. They were distributed to the proper graves through the kind efforts 
of the Acton Cemetery Department and its Superintendent, Fred S. Kennedy, assisted by the Acton 
Boy Scouts. The members of the Acton Cemetery Department and the Acton Highway Department 
were both very cooperative and helpful in the preparation of the cemeteries and the route of the 
parade. 

On Sunday afternoon. May 30, 1965, the Marching Unit of the Acton Minutemen and members 
of the Edwards -Quimby Post #284 American Legion gathered in the cemetery in North Acton to pay 
tribute to the Veterans and other citizens of Acton who are buried in that small but impressive cem- 
etery. The invocation was given by Rev. Roger Wootton after which a wreath was placed and the 
Minutemen fired three volleys. 

On Memorial Day from 8:00 to 8:30 a.m. Mrs. Wendell Hess played the Chimes of the Acton 
Congregational Church. The parade formed in Acton Center at 8:00 a.m. under the direction of 
Mr. Robert Trocki, Marshal. 

At the services in front of the Town Hall, Rev. Justin Hartman offered the invocation and 
wreaths were placed on the respective monuments in honor of all deceased veterans of Acton of all 
wars. The Parade proceeded to the Woodlawn Cemetery where similar services were held with 
Rev. J. Gary Campbell offering the invocation. 

From Woodlawn Cemetery the parade was transported in buses to South Acton, reforming in 
the South Acton Shopping Center parking lot and proceeding along Main Street to Quimby Square. At 
Quimby Square, Father John Donlon gave the invocation. A wreath was placed in honor of Private 
Howard Quimby who was the first soldier from Acton to give his life in World War I. A detail of 
Acton Naval Reservists marched over the bridge to cast a floral spray into the waters of Fort Pond 
Brook as a token of memory to all Naval, Marine and Coast Guard personnel from Acton who have 
given the supreme sacrifice. The parade proceeded to the South Acton Fire House for a coffee 
break which was served to all marchers by the Junior Guild of the South Acton Congregational Church. 

Once more the parade was transported by buses to the Mt. Hope Cemetery where a wreath 
was placed in honor of all veterans who are buried in that cemetery. The invocation was given by 
Rev. Robert Dick. The parade then marched to Edwards Square. 

In Edwards Square the parade formed around the Mead Triangle. A wreath was placed in 
honor of Private Sidney Edwards and the invocation was given by Rev. David Hirano. At exactly 
noon Mrs. Peter Gray with the aid of her son and Clark McElvein posted the Peter Gray Flag to the 




Memorial Day Services in Acton 1965. 



^ ( 




Acton Minutemen 

on Causeway 

leading to 

Old North Bridge. 




Acton Minutemen on Old North Bridge. 




Acton Minutemen re-enact Battle at White Plains. 



top of the mast and taps was played by the Acton-Boxborough High School Band followed by the sing- 
ing of the National Anthem led by Philip Morrison. The ceremony was concluded with the benedic- 
tion by Rev. David Hirano. From noon until 12:30 p.m., Mrs. Philip Morrison played the chimes 
of the West Acton Baptist Church. 

ACTIVITIES OF THE ACTON MINUTEMEN 

The Acton Minutemen were organized on February 9th, 1963 by the Public Ceremonies and 
Celebrations Committee with the cooperation of a group of men selected from the men's organiza- 
tions of the town and other interested persons. Since that time, the Minutemen have participated 
in all Acton Public Ceremonies and Celebrations and have brought additional favorable notice to 
Acton through their participation in events of National, Regional, and local interest. 

On January 20, 1965, the Acton Minutemen joined with the official Massachusetts party com- 
memorating the Inauguration of President Johnson in Washington, D. C. and were televised to the 
world. They also participated in the dedication of the Prudential Center and War Memorial Auditori- 
um in Boston; the Massachusetts Day activities at the New York World's Fair and the reenactment 
of the Battle of White Plains. 

The Acton Minutemen, headed by Col. Walter Johnson, express theii' appreciation to the 
townspeople for their interest and encouragement given to the group during 1965. 

CONCLUSION 

The Committee is proud that during the five years of our Patriots Day Programs thousands 
of people have participated and have felt the quickening of a patriotic spirit within them as they trod 
"The Line of March of the Acton Minutemen." The story of their experience has been told to thou- 
sands more. The true story of the stirring events of the beginning of the American Revolution, and 
of Acton's heroic participation is becoming more widely known. We are proud of Acton's part in 
our American Heritage, and proud that so many Americans have shared it with us, that they might 
have a new and greater appreciation of the forthright courage and sacrifice that brought our precious 
American Freedoms, and a greater determination to preserve and defend them so that they will be 
passed on, intact, to our children. 

Many letters and comments expressing these thoughts have been received from prominent 
people and from the unknown, but one letter received from Akron, Ohio, high school girl expresses 
the fervor of an inspired patriotism that will influence this young lady and her associates for years 
to come. 

"I want you to know how much my visit to Acton meant to me and how much I 
appreciated it. 

I have always been aware that sacrifices have been made for the American Way 
of Life, but I never realized the extent of this sacrifice until my visit to Acton. 

The Revolutionary Soldiers fought for a dream . They left their homes and fam- 
ilies for a dream . Our Freedoms have been purchased by blood. 

Being an American is much more to me now. I must make myself worthy of the 
sacrifices and must do all in my power to preserve and expand the ideals for 
which so many have died." 

Thank you, 
Elaine Lewis 

We will endeavor to keep all of our programs simple, direct and conducive of this kind of 
response. 

Raymond Shamel, Chairman 
Seymour DiMare, M. D. 
Russell Hayward 
Carl Hedin 
Edward Warren 
Percy Wood 



SELECTMEN 



As organized at its regular meeting on March 2, 1965, Warren Birch, senior member in point 
of service, is Chairman, John Loring, Member, and Mary Hadley, Clerk. From that date to the end 
of 1965 recorded meetings are as follows: 43 regular, 27 special, 72 public hearings of which 7 were 
separate from any other meeting. Licenses considered totaled 170 in this period including those re- 
quiring public hearings. 

An unusual characteristic of this Board is the short period of service common to all its mem- 
bers. Not in many years has so much effort had to be put forth to learn the old paths while carving 
out the new ones demanded by new legislation and continuing Town growth. Without the invaluable 
support of department heads and employees, as well as the many Town Committees and Boards, our 
accomplishments would indeed have been fewer. 

This year we placed strong emphasis on information exchange among committees and officials 
that carry out the will of Town and District Meetings. It is proving to be a slow process, setting our 
own milestones, expecting no dramatic effects. Officially constituted by us in May the Water Re- 
sources Advisory Committee, working with agencies of the Commonwealth and Federal Government, 
is pulling together various geologic and soil studies already completed for Acton, with new water 
sources their immediate objective. The Board consistently encourages information exchange in this 
and the areas of economic planning and long-range capital investment to the end that critical decisions 
made by Acton will assure the kind of town its citizens want now and in the future. To facilitate this 
interchange with you we plan that THE SELECTMEN REPORT (first issue in October) will appear at 
occasional intervals. After hearings, study, and conferences with other Commonwealth and local 
officials, the committees concerned agreed on a modus operandi for cases involving flood plain pro- 
tection, popularly known as the Hatch Act. Similar action precedes granting licenses for the sale of 
liquor as permitted by the voters in November, 1964. A continuing concern is enforcement of Town 
Bylaws whether recently enacted (such as junk cars) or long on the books (such as earth removal). 
Modification of an existing law, or changing a decision to fit new circumstances, such as land taking 
for highway construction like High Street or a change in purpose for land taking as on Arlington Street, 
consumes much time in research and deliberation. 

The emergency is past, the parking lot is filled daily, and Acton retains railroad service by 
Town Meeting vote of March, 1965, and our cooperative negotiation and action. The problem of a 
sound plan for location and protection of the Town's investment in public works equipment is still 
with us as is the need for expanded office space organized so it will economically serve the citizens 
who are part of Acton's growth. We are accumulating facts and figures to provide a firm foundation 
for deciding this perplexing matter. 

We regret the loss of those experienced and dedicated persons who have left Town affairs, 
whether from paid or unpaid posts. At the same time we welcome their successors and wish them 
the mutual satisfaction those before them enjoyed. We realize the strength accruing to the Town 
through persons who enjoy their work and feel rewarded for their effort. We consider each appoint- 
ment on this basis. 



Specific details of individual and commiittee accomplishments are not included here; you will 
find these in their reports. We aim, instead, to point to growth in effective working relationships 
and cooperative effort that we think is in the best interests of the Town. 





Former Selectman and Mrs. Lawrence 
Donnelly honored on May 9, 1965. 



Acton's Board of Selectmen: Warren Birch, 
Mrs. Mary Hadley and John Loring. 



10 



POLICE 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

This report includes all arrests and prosecutions. Motor Vehicle accidents, bicycle regis- 
trations, houses checked while people were on vacation, parking violations, defective equipment 
tags, telephone calls received and sent, and other items. 

ARRESTS AND PROSECUTIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING OFFENSES 



Accosting 1 

Affray 2 

Alcoholic Beverage in Motor Vehicle 

Being a Minor 6 

Allowing Improper Person to Operate 

a Motor Vehicle 1 

Allowing Unregistered Motor Vehicle 

to be Operated 1 

Annoying Phone Calls 1 

Assault and Battery 2 

Assault and Battery on a Police Officer. . . 2 

Assault with Intent to Commit Rape 1 

Attaching Plates 2 

Begetting. 2 

Breaking & Entering & Larceny in the 

Night-time 3 

Demanding Payment in Excess of Selling 

Price 1 

Disturbing the Peace 2 

Driving within 500 feet of a Fire Truck. . . 1 

Drunk 38 

False Weight 1 

Failure to Display Proper Registration 

Plate 1 

Fraudulent Check 1 

Giving False Name 1 

Going Away After Property Damage 2 

Larceny. 9 

Law of the Road 7 

Lord's Day Violation 1 

No License in Possession 17 

Non -Support 5 

No Registration in Possession 2 

Operating After Revocation of License ... 1 

Operating After Suspension of License ... 4 

Operating a Motor Vehicle Without Lights . 2 



Operating so as to Endanger 33 

Operating under the Influence of 

Intoxicating Liquor 25 

Operating an Uninspected Motor Vehicle . 12 

Operating Uninsured Motor Vehicle ... 6 

Operating an Unregistered Motor Vehicle. 5 

Parking Violation 1 

Passing Where View is Obstructed .... 2 

Permitting Overweight 2 

Possession of Altered License 1 

Red Light 28 

Refusing to Stop for Police Officer .... 2 

Runaway 1 

School Bus Violation 9 

Speeding 338 

Statutory Rape 1 

Stop Sign 36 

Stubborn Child 1 

Suspicious Person 1 

Town Bylaw Violation 1 

Trespassing 2 

Unnecessary Noise 2 

Using a Motor Vehicle Without Authority. . 2 

Vagrant 1 

Delinquent Child - False Alarm of Fire . . 1 

Delinquent Child - Fornication 1 

Delinquent Child - Malicious Injury to 

Dwelling 2 

Delinquent Child -No License in Motor 

Vehicle 1 

Delinquent Child - Obscene Telephone 

Calls 1 

Delinquent Child - Speeding 2 

Delinquent Child - Suspicious Person ... 1 
Delinquent Child -Using Motor Vehicle 

without Authority 4 



MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENT REPORT 

1964 1965 

Total Number of Accidents Covered by the Department 124 137 

Number of Occupants Injured 55 48 

Number of Occupants Killed 1 

Number of Pedestrians Injured 6 4 

Number of Bicyclists Injured 1 7 

Injured on Motorcycles and Motorbikes 6 



11 



a> 




12 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 



Bicycles Registered 211 

Complaints Received and Investigated .... 149 
Cruiser Ambulance Trips to Acton 

Medical Center 27 

Cruiser Ambulance Trips to Emerson 

Hospital 139 

Cruiser Ambulance Trips to Metroj^olitan 

State Hospital 4 

Defective Equipment Tags Issued 56 

Doors Found Unlocked in Buildings and 

Places of Business 81 

Electric Wires Down and Reported to 

Edison - 13 

Emergencies Answered 169 

Fire Alarms Answered 69 



Motorists Assisted by Patrol 25 

Motor Vehicles Checked by Night Patrol . 81 

Night-time Parking Tickets 78 

Parking Tickets 61 

Property Check, Slips Left at Request 

of Owner 460 

Street Lights Out, Reported to Edison . . 187 

Summonses Sent Out for Service 204 

Summonses Served 404 

Telephone Calls - Incoming 5,096 

Telephone Calls - Outgoing 1,955 

Times Resuscitator Was Used 8 

Total Number of Arrests Made 70 

Traffic Lights out and Reported to 

Department of Public Works 34 



There were 1,051 Motor Vehicles checked by the Department for Traffic or Motor Vehicle 
violations for which operators received verbal warning, summonses to appear in Court, or had the 
violation reported to the Registrar for action. 

I have recommended to the Board of Selectmen that both Cruisers be traded in 1966. 

In closing I would like to thank all the members of the Department, and my Secretary who 
worked with me in carrying out the duties of the Police Department during the year and to all others 
who assisted us I am grateful. 

Edward J. Collins, Jr. 
Chief of Police 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



Principal in the activities of the Acton Civil Defense Agency during 1965 has been the main- 
taining of Acton's qualifications in Federal Financial Assistance Programs. This qualification is 
conditioned on the Agency's participation in monthly communication drills and inter -agency meet- 
ings involving the Director and staff members. It relates to training exercises in rescue, medical 
self-help and other emergency-type measures. During 1965 such courses have been given in Acton 
and have also been attended in adjacent communities. This kind of participation in and support of 
Civil Defense activities maintains Acton's qualifying position. 

Acton has benefited from this qualification to the extent that several town departments have 
received Surplus Government Property for a yearly total as follows: 1965 Surplus Property - 
$11,987 original value; $354.00 cost to Acton. The probable real value to the Town of Acton of this 
used equipment is $4,000.00 

The November Blackout provided a realistic test of Acton's emergency capability and all town 
departments responded quickly and efficiently to the situation. 

There is a need for growth in both the Medical and Auxiliary Police branches of Acton Civil 
Defense and these two programs will receive priority attention in the coming year. 

John F. McLaughlin 
Director 



13 




14 



FIRE 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

I herewith submit my thirty-third annual report of the Fire Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1965. 

Total number of alarms responded to are as follows: 

Residential 21 

Non-residential 4 

Mercantile 

Manufacturing 1 

Miscellaneous 5 

Grass and Brush 103 

Automobile and Outside Equipment 3 2 

Malicious False Alarms 9 

Smoke Scares and Accidental 13 

Accidents and Emergencies Ill 

Out of Town 21 

320 

Loss to Buildings $28, 047. 50 

Lost to Contents 8, 547. 30 

Loss to Automobiles 2, 340. 00 



$38, 934. 80 



Permits Issued 



Oil and Power Burners Ill 

Blasting 35 

Open Air Fires 1501 

Inspections and Investigations 1481 

Collected 

Permits $ 72. 50 

Station Rentals 690. 00 

Miscellaneous 17.00 

Testing Water Mains 46. 00 

Collected on Accident 1,379.42 

$2, 204. 92 

Several major repair jobs were necessary on the trucks this year: 

The pump on Engine #7 was rebuilt. 

Engine #6 was repaired as the result of an accident. 

Engine #3 was overhauled and the equipment brought up to date. 

The new ladder truck was received and put into service on September 22, 1965 and has 

proved its worth on several occasions. 
The new Chief's Cruiser was received and put into service on August 11, 1965. 

Under Capital Outlay the fire alarm was extended into Nash Road and also on Kelley and Bev- 
erly Roads. 

Fire Alarm Boxes installed by the town or others: 

Box #1121 Town Hall 

Box #1541 Harvard Court (Brookview Apartments) 

Box #245 Beverly Road at Doris Road 

Box #2532 On Hosmer Street at Russell Road 

Box #3216 Nash Road 

Box #3541 On Charter Road at Junior High School 

Box #3551 Hayward Road at Haartz Auto Fabric Co. 



15 



1966 PROGRAM 

I would like to see the Stabilization Fund 
continued. 

Fire Alarm Extension: 

On Newtown Road to Evergreen Road. 

On Elm Street to the new school. 

On Hayward Road to Jefferson Drive. 

I am asking for one additional man this 
year to fill in for sick leaves, days off, vaca- 
tions, etc. 

The buildings and equipment are in good 
condition. 

On closing I wish to thank the firefighters 
and auxiliary for their cooperation in making 
this a successful year. I also wish to thank the 
several boards and clerical staff at the Town 
Hall who have contributed to the support and 
operation of the Fire Department. 




New Ladder Truck 



H. S. MacGregor, Chief 



STREETS 



Chapter 90 Construction. Work on the High Street relocation has finally started, 
for this project will be hauled during the winter months. 



All the fill 



Chapter 90 Maintenance. An inch and a half of Type I Bituminous Concrete was applied to a 
portion of Main Street between Nagog Hill Road and Newtown Road. This was also applied to a por- 
tion of Concord Road around the monument. 

Chapter 81. The following streets were scraped, patched, and swept; and then they were 
resurfaced with asphalt and sand: 

Arlington Street, part 
Central Street 
Charter Road, part 
Concord Road 
Hayward Road 



Nashoba Road 
River Street, part 
School Street, part 
Taylor Road 
Windsor Avenue, part 



The usual patching of trenches and holes was done throughout the year. 

General Highway. With the M. B. T. A. now serving us, a parking area was constructed off 
Railroad Street, South Acton. Approximately 30 vehicles can be accommodated. A hot top walk 
was made from the parking lot to the railroad station landing. 

Twenty-nine hundred feet of the road leading to the Town Forest was graveled and graded. 
Material from the Town Disposal area was used for this. Two large leaching fields were made at 
the edge of the Town Forest for the town's sewerage. It is hoped that this will be adequate for some 
time. 

Eleven hundred and sixty feet of Adams Street was widened and filled, a new 30-inch culvert 
was installed, and crushed gravel was spread and graded. 



16 



Forest Road and Minot Avenue (from Taylor Road to Forest Road) were widened considerably. 
A number of trees had to be removed and poles relocated. Gravel was hauled in to shape up the 
streets, and then a two to three -inch course of mix-in -place was applied. 

Hammond Street and a portion of Robbins Street were graveled and shaped. 

The Martin Street bridge project was finally completed. Two culverts measuring 56 X 6 feet 
were installed. The ball field house was moved, and the road area was widened to a traveled way of 
24 feet. A guard rail was installed, and the sides were loamed and seeded. 

A bad corner on Parker Street at the intersection of Independence Road was removed, and the 
road was widened considerably. 

Drainage. Drainage projects in 1965 included the following: 

Central and Summer Streets: 102 feet of 42 inch culvert was installed along with 
one catch basin. The area was loamed and seeded. 

Minot Avenue: 320 feet of 12 inch reinforced concrete pipe with two catch basins 
and two manholes. 

Spencer Road: 138 feet of 15 inch reinforced concrete pipe and 450 feet of 12 -inch 
reinforced concrete pipe and one manhole. Rough grading was done, but final 
grading and seeding will be done in the spring. 

Vicinity of 101 Windsor Avenue: A 12 -inch culvert was replaced. 

Vicinity of 105 School Street: One catch basin was replaced. 

Vicinity of 180 School Street: A new culvert and catch basin were installed. 

Signs and Lines. The usual repairs were made to various signs, and new signs were installed 
throughout the town. Speed limit signs were installed on Hosmer Street. 

The crosswalks were painted again this year, and the Lions Club very generously donated the 
green paint. The center lines were repainted the usual white and yellow. The angle and parallel 
parking blocks were repainted. The yellow curbing was extended at the intersections of Central 
Street and Windsor Avenue at Massachusetts Avenue. 

Sidewalks. During the summer the sidewalk in Acton Center was hot topped for a distance of 
1020 feet from the Center Store. The sidewalks in West Acton were patched. 

Care of Grounds. Early in the spring the grounds were fertilized and rolled. They were main- 
tained as usual during the summer. 

Disposal Area. The area has been well maintained under the supervision of Arthur Conquest. 
The controlled burning has worked out very well. It would be appreciated if those using the Disposal 
Area would remember to cover all their loads in order to prevent debris from blowing on to the 
streets of the town. 

New Equipment. The Department has acquired the following much -needed equipment: 

A 4|- yard Austin Western Power Sweeper was received early in the summer. With our own 
sweeper, it was possible to sweep many more streets this year than previously. This piece 
of equipment has been needed for some time and has worked very well. 

The acquisition of a Grace Tag-Along Sweeper has been a great help during the application 
of mixes and oiling. 

Our new Secard Hydraulic Sander has been very satisfactory. It is a new design and re- 
quires very little maintenance. 

We have received two new Frink one-way snow plows. 

A new sign machine has been purchased, and now we make all of the signs in our shop. It 
is a 3M machine and works well. 

In mid-summer a new Ford i-ton pick-up truck was acquired. 

Through Civil Defense we received a 10 -ton International truck, and the Fall Town Meeting 
provided for a new 6-8 yard Perfection dump body. This unit will be used a great deal. 



17 




Highway Department Yard 



New Street Sweeper 



Also through Civil Defense we were fortunate to acquire a Clark tow tractor which is in very 
good condition. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation for the cooperation I have received from the 
Board of Selectmen, the Highway Department, and the Water District. The School Department and 
Civil Defense have helped us considerably to acquire equipment. The Engineering Department has 
been a great asset to us. 

Allen H. Nelson 
Superintendent of Streets 



SIDEWALK COMMITTEE 



At the Town Meeting in March 1965 an article was considered which would aim to complete the 
sidewalks along Routes 27 and 111. The $2500.00 to begin filling these gaps, amounting to about 20% 
of the length, was voted. 

Since the State Department of Public Works responded favorably when contacted by Mr. Donnelly 
and a foot bridge was constructed across Fort Pond Brook at no expense to the town. Route 111 was 
listed as the priority location when the Town Engineer asked for five choices of where to start the 
sidewalk program. 

In response to this expression of interest in Route 111, the Selectmen contacted the Department 
of Public Works to arrange for construction of sidewalks in conjunction with the major reconstruction 
of Route 111. The Department of Public Works responded and specified the steps necessary. 

In considering the complications of scheduling with the Department of Public Works, and the 
ambiguity in the extent of the sidewalks which the State will feel required to replace, a concensus 
developed that it would be preferable to separate the expenditure of town funds for sidewalks from 
State road reconstruction such as is planned for Route 111. It was therefore decided to begin side- 
walk construction along Route 27. 

The original list of five segments of sidewalk will therefore be revised in priority but be com- 
pleted on the same schedule. Another article for $2500 will be put before the town at its annual meet- 
ing to keep this program on schedule. 

Irene M. Rhodes 

Francis J. Schell 

John E. Dunphy, Jr. 

Margaret M. Coughlan, Chairman 



STREET LIGHT COMMITTEE 



On December 31, 1965 there were 464 street lights in the town as against 364 when this com- 
mittee was formed in 1960. 

During the past year lights have been installed at the new Police Station and orders placed for 
installation of lights in the Municipal Parking Lot adjacent to the South Acton Railroad Station. In 
addition, new lights were placed at various other needed locations. 

In several instances requests for street lights were not recommended by the committee since 
the proposed location would aid only the petitioner and not materially affect the over -all lighting of 
the town. 

We subscribe to the policy adopted with the formation of the committee that new street lights 
in most instances, will be installed only at street intersections, dangerous curves and locations 
designated as hazardous by the Fire Chief, Police Chief or this committee. 

Our suggested budget for 1966 is the same as the 1965 figure. This estimate should not be 
exceeded unless there is unexpected industrial development in the town. 

We extend to the Board of Selectmen our sincere appreciation for their cooperation during the 
year 1965. 

Joseph F. Bushell, Chairman 
Byrd D. Goss 
Leslie F. Parke 



ENGINEERING 



During the year 1965 the Engineering Department worked on numerous projects for the various 
Town Boards, Committees and Departments. They are as follows: 

For the Board of Selectmen we continued work in preparation for construction of the High Street 
relocation. The specifications for bidding on the Town Hall Sprinkler System were written. We as- 
sisted in revising the takings for the layout of Arlington Street. Also we prepared plans, designed 
and laid out the municipal parking lot on Railroad Street. 

Work for the Planning Board consisted of the following projects. We assisted the Board in 
study and supervision of fifteen subdivisions. We wrote descriptions for laying out and made final 
inspection of roads accepted at the November 15 Town Meeting. Assistance was also given the 
Board in revising their subdivision rules and regulations. 

The Board of Assessors received their Atlas completed and updated to January 1, 1965. Work 
has been started on revisions to January 1, 1966. 

We assisted the Board of Health in determining high water elevations for review of septic sys- 
tem designs. 

Plans were drawn and field layout was done for burial lots in Mt. Hope Cemetery. For the 
Cemetery Department we also made preliminary site inspection and drew sketches of the proposed 
new cemetery garage. 

For the Conservation Commission, plans were made for the purchase of the Pacy Property on 
Bulette Road and the Isaac Davis Trail Easement as it crosses the Richmond Property in Acton Center. 



19 



The Building Inspector received a set of street (house) number maps. These consisted of the 
street numbers plotted on sepias of the Assessors Maps mylar originals. 

In cooperation with the Sewerage Study Committee Subdivision Topographic Plans and available 
road profile plans were loaned to Metcalf and Eddy Engineers for the preparation of the contour maps 
and sewerage study. |^ 

We worked closely with the Highway Department on many projects. Preparation of construction 
plans and field layout was done for the installation of culverts on Martin Street for Fort Pond Brook. 
We did field layout for improvements at the intersection of Parker Street and Independence Road. 
Grades were laid out for drainage projects on Prospect Street at Spencer Road, Minot Avenue near 
Taylor Road, and for additional piping between Willow Street and Summer Street. We also contin- 
ued assistance in the effort to locate a suitable site for a new highway yard. 

In October 1965, John J. Dowd, Town Engineer, resigned to accept a job as a field engineer 
in South Vietnam. Mr. Charles Perkins was hired as engineering consultant until a new Town Engi- 
neer is engaged. 

David Abbt 
Engineering Assistant 



PLANNING BOARD 



The Acton Planning Board has had an extremely active and interesting year. We have attended 
3 5 regular and special meetings, and 13 joint meetings of Boards, Committees and Commissions; 
signed 67 plans that do not require subdivision approval; inspected streets for both town meetings; 
held the following number of hearings, 8 zoning and rezoning, 12 subdivision, 1 Building Bylaw, and 
1 Board of Appeals. 

In March, 1965, those elected to the Board were: Charles E. Orcutt, Jr., Charles D. O'Neal, 
Jr., Mrs. Donald E. Bryant and Mrs. Donald M. Perkins. Leonard E. Ray and Richard C. Janson 
left the Board when their terms expired. To both these men, our thanks for their counsel. 

Several appointments were made by the Board to other town committees. Charles D. O'Neal 
is a member of the Acton Advisory Committee on Water Resources, and Mrs. Donald M. Perkins is 
a member of the Town Administration Study Committee. 

Mr. Orcutt and Mrs. Perkins attended the New England Conference on Urban Renewal and 
Environmental Health; Mr. Tinker and Mr. Orcutt, the Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors 
meeting; and Mrs. Perkins, the Mass. Federation of Planning Boards spring conference. 

Several changes pertaining to the zoning bylaw were made; namely, frontage requirements, 
shopping center regulations, business and industrial clarifications. There were four petitions for 
a change in zoning which were turned down by the town. The passage of the Hatch Act by the State 
Legislature is intended to prevent the misuse of our wetlands. For this reason and others, it was 
decided to pass over the article on the warrant regarding flood plain zoning. We have had several 
requests for permission to fill near a brook and each of these has been inspected and discussed be- 
fore our recommendation was made. 

Our Subdivision Rules and Regulations had not been revised since 1958, so the Board decided 
to undertake this project. It required over 40 hours of discussion and research even though we had 
an excellent draft which John Loring and Fred Hanack had prepared. We held an informal meeting 
with the subdividers in town to listen to their comments, then held a public hearing on our final draft. 
It was printed and adopted on August 9, 1965 and is now available at the Town Hall for $1.50. 

The Board was quite active in the administration of the Subdivision Control Law. The follow- 
ing were approved in 1965: 

Evergreen Heights 2 lots Acton Center 

Balsam Drive (Pinewoods) 3 lots Acton Center 

20 



Isaac Davis Park 
Chadwick Estates 
Putnam Park 
Heritage Farms 
Centre Village 
Williamsburg Park 
Stonehedge (Section II) 



47 lots 
19 lots 
63 lots 
34 lots 
31 lots 

2 lots (Industrial) 
11 lots 



Acton Center 
South Acton 
Acton Center 
South Acton 
Acton Center 
South Acton 
Acton Center 



We were very sorry to have John Dowd, Town Engineer, resign to do construction work in 
Viet Nam. We were extremely fortunate, however, to obtain the services of Charles Perkins, 
Registered Engineer, as our Consultant. He has met with us at our regular meetings, the second 
and fourth Mondays, in the Town Engineer's office, as did Mr. Dowd. 

During the year we have had several citizens request that we study the following: the swim- 
ming pool bylaw, buffer zones in industrial areas and height of industrial buildings. We intend to 
research these projects in 1966. Other items of study which the Board wishes to discuss are: the 
concept and application of cluster zoning, apartments, and the business and industrial zoned areas. 
We recommend that the practice of a Special Town Meeting in the fall, preferably in November, be 
continued so that planning board articles can be presented. 

We wish to thank the various boards, committees and departments of the town and especially 
Mr. David Abbt of the Engineering Department and Mrs. Arnold Woodward, our secretary, for their 
cooperation during the past year. 




David P. Tinker, Chairman 
Beatrice C. Perkins, Clerk 
Charles E. Orcutt, Jr. 
Charles D. O'Neal, Jr. 
Ellen C. Bryant 



Left to right: Mrs. Barbara Woodward 
(Planning Board Secretary), Mrs. 
Beatrice Perkins, Chairman David Tinker 
and Bruce GuUion who is stating his case 
at a Planning Board hearing. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Total number of devices inspected and sealed, 178. 
Sealing fees collected and paid to Treasurer, $348.00 



George K. Hayward 



21 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



The Acton Board of Appeals held ten public hearings during the year 1965 on the following 
matters: 

Permits for earth removal 

Granted 3; Denied 0; All granted subject to conditions. 

Variances from the requirements of the Protective Zoning Bylaw 
Set-back requirement 
Granted 4; Denied 

Frontage requirement 
Granted 0; Denied 1 

Use requirement in a residential zone 
Granted 1; Denied 

Permit for specific use 

Petition withdrawn by the petitioner. No decision. 

William C. Sawyer 
Herschel N. Hadley 
Hayward S. Houghton 



BUILDING COMMITTEE 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

During the year 1965 the Acton Building Committee worked on the following projects: 

1. Acton Police Station. This project was completed and accepted. 

2. Elm Street Elementary School. The construction contract was awarded to John Tocci and 
Sons, Inc., the low bidder for the sum of $732,068.00. The elementary school is sched- 
uled to be completed before September 1966. 

3. Library Addition. The construction contract was awarded to Alexander Associates, Inc., 
the low bidder for the sum of $204,959.00. The Library addition is scheduled for com- 
pletion in 1966. 

4. Cemetery Garage and Office. The Building Committee reviewed the requirements of the 
Cemetery Department for the proposed garage and office and visited the suggested sites 
for the new building. The Building Committee concurred with the Cemetery Department's 
first choice for the site of the building. It is contemplated that an article will be submitted 
at the March 1966 Town Meeting requesting funds to prepare working drawings. 

5. The Building Committee met on three occasions with the Town Administration Study Com- 
mittee to discuss the duties of the Building Committee and the make-up and duties of a 
proposed Site Committee. 

Joseph S. Cobb, Chairman 
Frank L. Arms 
*Lloyd W. Priest 
**Norman Mcintosh 
Arnold H. Mercier 
Edward J. Collins, Jr., Police Chief 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy, Cemetery Dept. 
* Resigned Edwin Richter, School Committee 

** New Member Marvin L. Tolf, Library Committee 

22 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



r s 




Kenneth E. Jewell 
Building Inspector 



Areas 

Residential 

Single Dwellings 
Multiple Family Dwellings 
Additions, Repairs 
Residential Garages 

Municipal 

Grammar School 
Commercial 
Swimming Pools 



No. of Permits 



148 
3 Bldgs. - 18 Units 
66 
28 



1 
11 
21 



Estimated Cost 



$3, 816, 100. 00 

120, 000. 00 

118, 551. 00 

66, 900. 00 



700, 000. 00 

246, 400. 00 

34. 679. 00 

$5, 102, 630. 00 



Receipts 



Fees for Permits 



$8, 065. 05 



Violation of Zoning h. Building Laws 

Building too close to lot line 

Building with no permit 

Occupancy without occupancy permit 

Swimming Pools without permit 

Attic access door too small 

Business in Residential Area 

Illegal Joist span 

Foundation to Garage too Shallow 

Defective Chimney 

Illegal Signs 

House Sheetrocked before Inspection 



No. 

3 
6 



Action 

2 Corrected 

6 Permits issued 

4 Issued 

4 Pending 

8 Permits granted 

2 Corrected 
1 Stopped 

1 Corrected 
1 Corrected 

3 Corrected 

1 Removed 

2 Licensed 

1 Corrected 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Two Hundred Seventy Five permits were issued. The sum of Two Thousand Three Hundred 
Forty dollars and Sixty Cents ($2,340.60) was collected in fees for these permits, and turned over 
to the Treasurer. 

Leslie F. Parke 
Inspector of Wir'es 



23 



HEALTH 



The activity of the Board of Health was marked by a number of changes in personnel during 
the past year. 

Jay S. Grumbling and Mrs. M. Jean Harris resigned as members of the Board during the 
summer. Mr. Grumbling left to accept a position in Cazenovia, New York and Mrs. Harris and 
family moved to Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

Dr. John T. Albright was elected to fill the vacancy caused by Mrs. Harris' resignation and 
George W. Moulton was elected to take Mr. Grumbling's place, both until the next annual town elec- 
tion. 

Both Dr. Albright and Mr. Moulton have backgrounds and training which are associated with 
the problems dealing with public health. 

Dr. Albright for a number of years had a dental practice in Acton prior to his entering the 
dental research field on a full time basis. 

George W. Moulton has had extensive experience in the engineering field dealing with the prob' 
lems of sewerage disposal, construction works and municipal management problems on the local, 
state and federal level. 

Mrs. Eileen F. Hale, R.N. Town Nurse for over 13 years submitted her resignation, effec- 
tive August 1, 1965, to accept the position of Acton School Nurse. She was tendered a party by her 
associates in recognition of her years of faithful and devoted service to the Board of Health and the 
citizens of Acton. 

Mrs. Dorothy Tetreault, R.N. was appointed Town Nurse on August 9, 1965. Mrs. Tetreault 
graduated from the Lowell General Hospital School of Nursing. For the past four years she has 
worked in the public health field as one of the school nurses at Phillips Academy in Andover. 

Nursing visits made totaled 1755 with $710.50 being collected for nursing service for the year. 

WALDEN CLINIC - MENTAL HEALTH 

The Board of Health has reviewed a proposal for inclusion of an article in the Annual Town 
Warrant to support the Walden Guidance Association, sponsors of the Walden Clinic in association 
with the Department of Mental Health of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The clinic accepts 
children with mental disorders up to the age of 16. It serves Acton, Carlisle, Concord and Lincoln. 

The Walden Guidance Association has requested that the Town of Acton contribute to the cost 
of clinic operation by making the item part of the Town budget. Lincoln and Concord voted 40<;^ per 
capita to be given to the clinic, amounting to $1600 and $5400 respectively in 1965. Carlisle donates 
$300 as part of the school budget and Acton contributes nothing for the general support of the clinic. 
The $500 carried in the Acton School Department budget is for actual school services rendered by 
the clinic social worker only. A total of $6000 is collected in fees. Of the 115 diagnosis and treat- 
ment cases during 1965, 41 were from Acton. At present, private contribution from the Blanchard 
Fund provides about $1000 per year; $4000 per year is needed from tax sources to help defray 
Acton's share of the cost. 

This is a basic health service that must be made available to any child should the need arise. \ 
There is a fee for the application interview, and fees for diagnostic evaluation and treatment. A 
determination of the family's ability to pay is made by the clinic social worker and the charge is 
made accordingly. A small portion of the case load is served free of charge. The staff consists of 
three part-time psychiatrists, one part-time social worker and one consultant psychiatrist as needec 
for adult emergency work. It is the intent of the Walden Guidance Association to move toward includ 
ing adult psychiatric service as soon as possible. 

An item will appear in the Town Warrant requesting the appropriate sum ($4000) be provided. 
24 



MEDICARE 

The function of Boards of Health with relation to Medicare is not clear at the time of publish- 
ing these notes. It is anticipated that increases in home care and nursing homes may enlarge cer- 
tain Board of Health functions, both in nursing calls and inspection activities. 

ACTON SANITARY CODE 

The Board of Health is revising the local sanitary code to include Article XI, "Minimum Re- 
quirements for the Disposal of Sanitary Sewage in Unsewered Areas", Massachusetts Department 
of Public Health. 

Other major additional changes include: 

1. Soils must be classified on the basis of the recent soils survey made of the Town of 
Acton. All plans submitted must demonstrate that on-site sewage disposal works 
would be expected to function properly, taking into consideration the limitations that 
may be encountered on any specific lot. 

2. Installers of on-site sewage disposal works will be requested to be licensed by the 
Board of Health. 

MOSQUITO CONTROL PROGRAM FOR 1966 

The Board of Health proposes that the Town purchase a fogging machine for the control of 
adult mosquitoes. This request is based on the good experience this past summer when fogging 
was done for the first time on a rental basis. 

The total cost for fogging the Town twice was $2300. It was our conclusion that a more satis- 
factory job of controlling adult mosquitoes would have been accomplished if the residential areas 
were fogged a minimum of four times, starting in the middle of May. This would cost $4600 on a 
rental basis. With Town-owned fogging equipment the cost would be: Material - $2152.00; Labor - 
$360.00; Total - $2512.00. 

A fogging machine like the one that was used last year would cost $2220, based on last year's 
prices. 

The use of Town-owned fogging equipment would pay for itself the first year, with the addi- 
tional advantage of having the equipment available when it was needed and under the control and 
direction of the Town. Larger savings would of course result in successive years of use. 

NEW GARBAGE COLLECTION CONTRACT 

On December 20, 1965, the Board of Health signed a short-term contract with Henry Anderson, 
extending his contract for garbage collection to March 31, 1966, at a cost of $6000. The above action 
was taken as an emergency measure under Massachusetts Law, Chapter 44, Section 13. 

The problem of the garbage contract originated on October 18, 1965, when Mr. Anderson sent 
the Board of Health a letter stating that he wished to renew his garbage contract but would require 
additional compensation. Mr. Anderson had worked for several years under the same contract and 
he informed the Board that with increased costs, including a new truck, he could not work through 
the more difficult winter months until the March Town Meeting at the old rate. 

During subsequent weeks the Board consulted with the Selectmen, Finance Committee and 
Town Counsel. In addition, comparisons were made with towns of similar size in the Boston area, 
and Paul Lesure of the Finance Committee interviewed Arthur H. MacKinnon, the Director of 
Accounts in the Massachusetts Department of Corporations and Taxation. 

It became apparent that there was a need for future contracts to begin in April shortly after 
the Annual Town Meeting, so that the Town could vote on any increased costs which would arise as 
the Town grew. After considering the rather limited legal alternatives for resolving the garbage 
contract problem (to ask for bids on a new contract in December, 1965 and to call a Special Town 
Meeting in January, 1966) the Board of Health with the concurrence of the Selectmen, Finance Com- 
mittee and Town Counsel, unanimously agreed that the best solution was to extend Mr. Anderson's 
contract for a three-month period as mentioned in the first paragraph. Early in 1966 the Town 
would ask for bids on a new contract which would begin April 1, 1966. The new contract would, by 
law, run for a period of one to five years. 

25 



CLINICS, INSPECTIONS, PERMITS AND LICENSES 



Clinics 



Dental 

Diptheria and Tetanus 
Immunization (Booster) 
Grades 1, 5, 9 and 12 

Tuberculin Screening Tests 
Grades 1, 4, 7 and 11 

Adult Tuberculosis X-ray 



No. of 
Persons 

112 

497 

437 

436 



Amount Collected 



$ 12. 00 



90. 60 
$102. 60 



Communicable Disease 

Chicken Pox 

German Measles 

Gonorrhea 

Infectious Hepatitis 

Infectious Mononucleosis 

Malaria 

Measles 

Mumps 

Salmonella 

Syphilis 

Tuberculosis (Committed) 

Tuberculosis (Non-infectious) 

Other Cases Reported 

Animal Bites 

Total Cases Reported 



Cases 
Reported 

49 
7 
None 
None 



None 
1 
4 



16 
137. 



Births 

Premature 

Deaths 
Infants 
Adults 



2 

52 



Chapter 111, Section 111 of the General Laws, 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, requires that 
all communicable diseases must be reported to 
the Board of Health. Phone 263-4736. 



Inspections Number 

Food Handling Establishnnents 35 

Schools and Kindergartens 12 

Swimming Pools 6 

Slaughtering Inspection None 



Permits and Licenses No. Issued 

Burial Permits 25 

Catering Permits 2 

Kindergarten & Nursery Schools 12 

Offal Transport 8 

Overnight Cabins & Camps 3 

Massage License 1 

Methyl Alcohol 8 

Milk Store License 25 

Milk Dealers License 10 

Plumbing Permits 248 

Gas Permits 204 
Sewage Works Permits 

New 170 

Repairs & Alterations 27 

Total Collected for Misc. Items 

Paid Visits by Town Nurse 

Total Transferred to Town Treasurer 



Fees Collected 



;2, 556. 50 
1, 622. 50 
1, 107. 00 



240. 50 

710. 50 

6, 339. 60 



26 




Board of Health 



Board Staff 



John T. Albright D.D.S., Chairman 
J. Huston Westover, M. D. 
George W. Moulton 

Robert C. Heustis, R. S., Agent 
Dorothy Tetreault, R.N. 
Nancy A. Gilberti, Secretary 

Edward J. Higgins 

Slaughtering Inspector 

Joseph G. Perry 

Plumbing & Gas Inspector 



Mosquito control program - 
George White cleaning culverts. 




Dorothy Tetreault - Nancy A. Gilberti 



Robert C. Heustis, Dr. J. Huston 
Westover and Dr. John T. Albright. 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Premises Inspected 25 

Cows 81 

Young Cattle 148 

Bulls 5 

Beef Cattle 7 

Swine 

Sheep 9 

Goats 

Horses 54 

Dog Bites 32 

Dogs Quarantined 3 2 

Carl W. Flint 
Animal Inspector 



27 



WELFARE 



Old Age Assistance. We have aided 34 persons under this category. 

Medical Assistance for the Aged (Kerr Mills Bill). This is a very active category, where 
persons are being aided either on a sustained basis or else only during periods of sickness. 

Aid to Families of Dependent Children . Seventeen families with a total of fifty -four children 
have received assistance. 

Disability Assistance. Only one person has been eligible for aid. 

General Relief. Four families received temporary help under this category. 

The following is a detailed analysis of the expenditures of the Board of Public Welfare for the 
year 1965 and the estimated expenditures for 1966: 

Old Age Assistance: 



Medical Assistance for the Aged: 

Aid to Families of Dependent Children: 

Disability Assistance : 

General Relief: 

Recoveries under Old Age Assistance: 
Estimated Expenditures for 1966: 



Public Assistance - All Categories' 
Salaries for Board Members 



Total Expenditures 








$41, 


552. 


85 


Federal Share 




$20. 


736. 


00 








State Share 




14, 


482. 


29 


35, 


218. 


29 


Acton Share 










$ 6, 

$41, 


334. 
289. 


56 

48 


Federal Share 




$20, 


161. 


01 








State Share 




14, 


075. 


68 


34, 


236. 


69 


Acton Share 










$ 7. 
$22, 


052. 
028. 


79 
02 


Federal Share 




$ 9. 


737. 


50 








State Share 




6, 


928. 


69 


16, 


666. 


19 


Acton Share 










$ 5, 
$ 3, 


361. 
614. 


83 
14 


Federal Share 




$ 


558. 


00 








State Share 




2, 


160. 


54 


2, 


718. 


54 


Acton Share 










$ 
$ 


895. 
611. 


60 
44 


State Share 












71. 


45 


Acton Share 
s' 










$ 
$ 7, 

$50, 


539. 
688. 

000. 
200. 


99 
06 

00 
00 




Lossie 


E. Lairc 


I 










Clinton 


S. Curtis 










Patience H. 


MacPhe 


rson 







28 




SCHOOL REPORT 



ORGANIZATION 

Acton School Committee 

Parker Harrison, Jr., Chairman Term expires 1968 

M. Virginia Biggy, Secretary Term expires 1966 

Albert W. Koch Term expires 1966 

George E. Neagle Term expires 1967 

Edwin W. Richter Term expires 1967 

Thomas E. Wetherbee Term expires 1968 

The Acton School Committee holds regular meetings on the third Monday of each month. The 
Committee convenes at the Acton -Boxborough Regional High School at 7:30 p.m. 

Telephone 
Superintendent of Schools, William L. O'Connell 3-5737 

Principals: 

Julia L. McCarthy, Marion L. Towne Schools - Alice F. Hayes 3-4982 

Florence A. Merriam School - Carolyn T. Douglas 3-2581 

Director of Guidance - Ruth R. Proctor 3-7738 

School Physician, Paul P. Gates, M. D 3-5671 

School Nurse, Eileen Hale 3-7738 

Director of Cafeterias, Barbara T. Parks 3-7977 

Director of Transportation, Salvatore Lipomi 3-2581 

Attendance Officer, David W. Scribner 3-2911 

Secretaries: 

Priscilla Felt, Superintendent's Office 3-5737 

Dorothy Hansen, McCarthy, Towne Schools 3-4982 

Dorothy Harding, Guidance Office 3-7738 

Molly Johnston, Superintendent's Office 3-5737 

Margaret Larsen, Health Office 3-7738 

Mary Ott, Florence A. Merriam School 3-2581 

Cafeteria Staffs: 

Julia L. McCarthy, Marion L. Towne Schools: Martha Lowden, Manager; Betty Bellevue, 

Gladys Cady, Emmie Corkum, Zita Jones, June Magoon, Mary Nichols, Marjorie Trebendis. 

Florence A. Merriam School: Mary Tuttle, Manager; Patricia Adams, Eva Campbell, Alice 

Castelline, Evelyn Hill, Gerd Jordan, Meredith Lambert, Marion Osterhoudt, Claire Peterson. 

Custodians: 

Head Custodian, Emery Nelson. Julia L. McCarthy, Marion L. Towne Schools: John Conquest 
and Peter Smoltees. Florence E. Merriam School: Robert Graham and Paul Richardson. 



29 




Julia L. McCarthy - Marion L. Towne Schools 




Florence A. Merriam School 



Elm Street Elementary School 



30 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 1966-1967 



Reopening of all Schools 
Winter Recess 
Spring Recess 
Memorial Day 
Close of School 
Summer Recess 
Teachers Meetings 
Reopening of all Schools 
Columbus Day 



Jan. 3, 1966 
Feb. 21 - 25 
April 18 -22 
May 30 
June 21 

Sept. 6, 1966 
Sept. 7 
Oct. 12 



Teachers Convention 
Veterans Day 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Christmas Holidays 
Reopening of all Schools 
Winter Vacation 
Spring Vacation 
Memorial Day 
Close of Schools 



Oct. 28 

Nov. 11 

Noon, Nov. 23, 24, 25 
Dec. 24 -Jan. 2, 1967 
Tues., Jan. 3, 1967 
Feb. 20 - 24 
April 17 - 21 
May 30 
June 20 



NO SCHOOL SIGNAL 



1-1-1-1 
2-2-2-2 



15 A. M. 
00 A. M. 



No School Acton Public Schools, Grades 1-6 
No School All Schools All Day 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To The School Committee and Citizens of Acton: 

Housing. The year 1965 was a breakthrough in the overcrowded conditions of the Acton Public 
Schools with the start of construction of a six hundred pupil school on the Elm Street site purchased 
in 1964. A second school on this site will be necessary soon because of the constant increase in stu- 
dent enrollment. If ground is broken for this second school in the spring of 1967, it should be ready 
for September, 1968. 

In September 1966, we hope to put into operation the grade assignments which were published 
in last year's town report on pages 54 and 55. The two major changes will be the availability of a 
second class for exceptional children and the reduction of class size to twenty-five pupils for each 
teacher in grades 1 through 3. 

With the average enrollment of 350 pupils in our incoming first grades for the next six years, 
classroom space will still be uppermost in the minds of the school committees in the future. 

Cost. I should like to point out the increased cost of two categories in the budget for 1966. 

(1) Instruction. The School Committee has passed a new salary schedule for the teachers which 
will take effect in September 1966. Therefore, the 1966 budget will include four months of this new 
schedule. The schedule calls for a starting salary of $5500 for teachers with bachelor degrees and 
reaches a maximum of $8400 after ten years of service. It should be noted here, however, that the 
Massachusetts Teachers Association has submitted a bill to the 1966 State Legislature for a salary 
schedule calling for a bachelor minimum of $5500 and a maximum of $8500 after ten years of service. 
If this bill passes it will almost parallel the Acton schedule. 

(2) Plant Operation. Referring to the building program above, the construction and opening of new 
schools will naturally increase this phase of the budget. Since the town is growing at a steady rate, 
the School Committee and I feel that these two phases, namely Instruction and Plant Operation, will 
show continued increase year by year. 

I should like to call attention to the citizens of Acton the ten year report of the Acton -Boxbor- 
ough Regional School District issued this year, which gives a complete summary of the District from 
the year 1955 through 1965. 

CONCLUSION 

Both the Acton Public Schools and Acton-Boxborough Regional School District (Grades 1-12) 
are increasing annually at the rate of approximately 250 to 300 pupils. A great deal of careful study 
is needed to examine the educational requirements of Acton because of this constant increase, and it 
is here that I wish to thank both school committees for the tremendous time and effort they have so 
willingly given to the Acton Public Schools and the Regional School District. Meeting with me almost 
weekly they have been very generous in their time and have given me 100% support in all my recom- 
mendations. Several other boards in the town have met with the School Committee, and I should like 
to thank them for their cooperation and support, namely, the Selectmen, Finance Committee and the 
Planning Board. The continued improvement in our schools can be contributed also to the excellent 
personnel in both systems. 

William L. O'Connell 
Superintendent of Schools 



31 



SCHOOL FINANCES - 1965 
Received - To the Credit of Schools 

State Aid for Transportation, Grades 1-6 $ 25.071.64 

State Aid for Public Schools, Chapter 70 (Town of Acton's share for Grades 1-6). . . 85, 343. 00 

Federal Aid 18,483.00 

Education of Handicapped 4, 662. 75 

$133,560.39 



Appropriated," March, 1965 

Total Expended from Appropriation (Including Capital Outlay) 



$590, 871. 00 
$580, 522. 27 



Expended for Operation in 1965 

Instruction $453, 538. 12 

Plant Operation and Maintenance 54, 389. 93 

Non -Instructional 3,975.99 

General Control 13, 586. 72 

Contingencies 990. 24 

Transportation 55, 705. 40 



'■'Includes expenditures from Appropriation and Federal Funds. 
Capital Outlay items. 



Does not include 



Gross Cost Per Pupil (1730 as of 6/30/65) 

Gross Cost of Operation (as above) 

Less State Receipts and amount of Federal Funds expended in 1965 

Net Cost Per Pupil (1730) 



$582, 186. 40 
119, 792. 64 



$582, 186.40* 

$ 336.52 

$462, 393. 76 
$ 267. 28 



MEMBERS OF THE ACTON FACULTY 

Superintendent of Schools, William L. O'Connell 

Principal, McCarthy, Towne Schools, Alice F. Hayes 

Principal, Merriam School, Carolyn T. Douglas 



Name 

Clara Ballantine 

Margaret Connoughton 
Patricia Davis 
Catherine Donahue 
Phyllis Foss 
Louise Harzigian 
Ann Jacobs 
Lois Nichols 
Helene Sacks 
* Ellen Sansone 
Therese Scimone 
Sally Strangman 

Dorothy Bunker 
Helen deCoste 
Linda Desmarais 
Helen Dooling 
Elizabeth Flint 
Janice FuUonton 
Janet Keenan 
Rayda Kinney 
Margery Lewis 
Alice O'Hearn 
* On leave of absence 



Professional Training Degree 

Western Reserve University BS 

Boston University M. Ed. 

Lowell State College BS 

Lesley College BS 

Wheelock College BS 

Fitchburg State College BS 

Lowell State College BS 

University of Minnesota BS 

Lowell State College BS 

Cornell University BS 

Lesley College BS 

Boston College BS 

Duke University BS 

Vanderbilt University AMT 

Jackson College AB 
Lesley College 

Boston University BS 

Marymount College BA 

Framingham State College BS 

Fitchburg State College BS 

Colorado State College AB 

Oregon State University BS 

University of Massachusetts BA 

Lowell State College BS, M.Ed. 



Grade 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I 

II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 



32 



Name 

Angela Theodore 
Elizabeth Walker 
Margaret Barrett 
Jean Comstock 
Mary Denahy 
Eileen Gilroy 
Carol Harvey 
Joan LeSage 
Mary Marcotte 
Mary Lou Parker 
Alice Viano 
Shirley Brown 
Susan Davies 
Jennie Johnson 

Madeleine Kingston 
Marlene MacLeod 
Janice Morgan 
Ruth Thompson 
Jean Warman 
Joan Bell 

Camilla Chickering 
Nancy Joslin 

Nancy Lapham 

Susan Neisuler 
Paulette Rackow 
Sandra Sessi 
Sara-Ann Soracco 
Nancy Wadsworth 
Louise Ewing 
Geraldine Farrell 
Anne Jones 
Cynthia Natoli 
Nancy Nizel 
James Palavras 

Barbara Parker 
Susan Shea 



George Balf 
Marcia Falb 

Ann Geikie 
Roberta Goldman 
Eileen Hale 

Linda Harding 
Jeanne Haskell 
Edward Leary 
Constantine Limberakis 
Salvatore Lipomi 

Anne Maetozo 
Agnes Manning 
Richard Marion 
Juta Moter 

Kathleen Moulton 
Judith Pennington 
Ruth Proctor 

George Revelas 



Professional Training 

Boston University 

Wheelock College 

Lowell State College 

Wheelock College 

Emmanuel College 

Lowell State College 

St. Lawrence University 

Fitchburg State College 

Lowell State College 

Fitchburg State College 

University of New Hampshire 

Lowell State College 

Jackson College 

Lowell State College 

Harvard University 

Fitchburg State College 

Boston University 

Fitchburg State College 

Lesley College 

Jackson College 

Elmira College 

Lesley College 

Mount Holyoke College 

Boston University 

Lake Erie College 

Boston University 

Boston University 

Elmira College 

Muskingham College 

Boston College 

Elmira College 

Westfield State College 

Emmanuel College 

Wellesley College 

Elmira College 

Boston University 

Boston University 

Fitchburg State College 

Boston University 

Bates College 

SPECIAL FIELDS 

Boston University 

University of Florida 

Columbia University 

St. Lawrence University 

Emerson College 

Mt. Auburn Hospital 

School of Nursing 

Boston University 

Ann Maria College 

Boston University 

Boston University 

Lowell State College 

Tufts College 

Boston University 

Salem State College 

Massachusetts College of Art 

Wellesley College 

Harvard Universit;;^ 

Regis College 

Manhattan School of Music 

Radcliffe College 

Boston University 

Lowell State College 



Degree 



Grade 



BS 


II 


BS 


II 


BS 


III 


BS 


III 


BA 


III 


BS 


III 


AB 


III 


BS 


III 


BS 


III 


BS 


III 


BA 


III 


BA 


IV 


BA 


IV 


BS 




M.Ed. 


IV 


BS 


IV 


BS 


IV 


BS, M.Ed. 


IV 


BS 


IV 


BA 


IV 


BS 


V 


BS 


V 


AB 




M.Ed. 


• V 


BA 




M.Ed. 


V 


BA 


V 


BS 


V 


BS 


V 


BS 


V 


BS 


V 


BS 


VI 


AB 


VI 


BA 


VI 


BS 


VI 


AB 


VI 


BA 




M.Ed. 


VI 


BS. M.Ed. 


VI 


AB 


VI 


BM 


Instrumental Music 


BA 




MA 


Guidance 


BS 


Physical Education 


BS 


Speech 


RN 


Nurse 


BM 


Vocal Music 


BA 


Vocal Music 


BS 


Physical Education 


BM 


Director of Music 


BS 




M.Ed. 


Opportunity Class 


BS 


Physical Education 


BS 


Remedial Reading 


BS 


Art 


BA 




M.Ed. 


Guidance 


BA 


French 


BM 


String Music 


AB 


Director of 


M.Ed. 


Guidance 


BS 


Instrumental Music 



33 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 

Dear Mr, O'Connell: 

The annual physical examinations were completed in November. Special examinations were 
done in August for students participating in organized athletics. Parents were notifed of medical, 
orthopedic, and dental problems as encountered. 

In conjunction with the Board of Health, clinics were held for Tuberculin Testing, Diphtheria 
and Tetanus immunization. 

I wish to thank you, the townspeople, teachers, and school and town nurses for their coopera- 
tion and assistance. 

Paul P. Gates, M. D. 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL NURSE 
September through December 1965 

Since September 1965, 885 physical examinations have been completed, for the football team, 
1st, 5th, 10th, grades and all athletes. Referrals have been sent for new problems and some exist- 
ing conditions. 

Hearing tests have been completed in the Primary and Elementary Schools. 

Daily visits have been made to all schools, but I am deeply indebted to the secretaries for their 
constant assistance in caring for the children. Next year we hope to have additional staff. 

Mrs. Janet Loughlin completed the Vision Testing, Pre -school clinic and the Tuberculin Test- 
ing for the last school semester before she resigned in June, for the happy occupation of motherhood. 
We certainly wish her and hers the best of good fortune. 

I am also very sorry to lose the help of Mrs. Anna Coombs, as Welfare Agent for the Town of 
Acton. She has been very helpful and especially kind to many children in her years of service. 

I wish to thank everyone who has helped make my first few months of school nursing very 
pleasant. 

Eileen F. Hale, R. N. 



AGE AND GRADE DISTRIBUTION TABLE (October 1, 1965) 



Entering Class of 
1971 1970 1969 1968 1967 
Pre-School 250 256 279 273 323 

Grade 1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 
Opportunity Class 



9 
10 
11 
12 



966 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 18 19 20 




305 


45 


281 
36 


29 

268 

35 


32 
226 

24 

1 


3 
33 

219 
32 

1 
1 


32 

219 

24 


1 

2 

38 

198 

1 

32 


3 

24 

2 

182 
23 


2 

47 

161 

22 


1 

3 

39 

162 

24 

1 


2 

1 

5 

27 

125 

27 


1 
3 

27 
106 

20 


Elementary 

1 1 

2 2 

22 1 1 
113 12 1 


355 
339 
295 
277 

292 

249 

8 

1815 

265 
229 
216 

180 
158 
146 



Regional School District 1194 
Acton Students Only 45 317 332 283 289 275 272 234 232 230 187 157 138 16 1 13009 



34 



ACTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Proposed Budget for 1966 
January 1 - December 31, 1966 

ADMINISTRATION 

School Committee ' $ 400. 00 

Salaries 12, 775. 00 

Conference Attendance 150. 00 

Expendable Supplies 250. 00 

Printing arid Advertising 75. 00 

Magazines, Books, Dues 150. 00 

School Census 150.00 

Miscellaneous 500. 00 $ 14, 450. 00 

INSTRUCTION 

Present Staff Salaries $462,736.00 

Additional Staff Needed (22) 51,500.00 

Substitutes , 7,000.00 

Conferences 300. 00 

Textbooks 10, 640. 00 

Supplies 17, 100. 00 

Miscellaneous 1. 000. 00 $550, 276. 00 

PLANT OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE 

Salaries $ 25,600.00 

Supplies 4, 000. 00 

Fuel 8, 400. 00 

Water • 500.00 

Gas 1, 500. 00 

Electricity 8, 500. 00 

Rentals 5, 702. 00 

Telephones 750. 00 

Maintenance Equipment 3, 500. 00 

Miscellaneous 1, 000. 00 $ 59, 452. 00 

NON -INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 

Libraries $ 2, 000. 00 

Salaries - Health Department 5, 350. 00 

Eye and Ear Tests 400. 00 

Health Supplies 150. 00 

Miscellaneous 300. 00 $ 8, 200. 00 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 

Furniture $ 1,063.00 

Music - Instruments and Equipment 2, 110. 00 

Miscellaneous . .i 500. 00 $ 3,673.00 

TRANSPORTATION 

Pupil Transportation $ 63,850.00 

Field Trips 1,000.00 

Contingencies 1, 200. 00 $ 66, 050. 00 

CONTINGENCY FUND $ 1, 000. 00 

SUMMARY 

ADMINISTRATION $ 14, 450. 00 

INSTRUCTION 550, 276. 00 

PLANT OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE .... 59, 452. 00 

NON -INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 8,200.00 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 3, 673. 00 

TRANSPORTATION 66, 050. 00 

CONTINGENCY FUND 1. 000. 00 

$703, 101. 00 



35 



LIBRARIES 




Groundbreaking for the Addition to the Acton Memorial Library 
Left to right: Marvin Tolf, Louise Gardiner, Warren Birch, 
William A. Wilde, Jr., Doris Peterson, Florence Merriam, 
Marion Piper and Hayward Houghton. 



The year 1965 has proved a busy year for the Trustees, with many difficult decisions to make. 
It was expected that the addition to the Memorial Library would be completed by the fall of 1965, but 
when the bids came in, they were much too high and all had to be rejected. Modifications stressing 
economy were made by Joseph Schiffer, the architect, and the Building Committee. In October the 
bids were opened again, and the low bid came within the estimate. The Building Committee deserves 
a great deal of praise for the many hours they have spent on the library addition. They showed them- 
selves most cooperative, accepting any suggestions given to them and working them into the plans 
when feasible. Construction has been started, and the building should be completed by the fall of 1966 

The Trustees have held 17 meetings this year. We have increased the staff of the library by 
hiring a page (a highschool girl who puts away books) and a full-time children's librarian, Mrs. Edna 
Custance. This now brings our staff to 3 full-time librarians, one part-time aide and the page. 

In May it was voted to open the library during the supper hours, and in October it was voted to 
open the library on Saturday miornings. This brings the number of hours the library is open to 48 
hours a week. 

The Acton Memorial Library now subscribes to 60 magazines and two more are given as gifts 
by townspeople. The circulation has increased tremendously. In 1959, circulation was 44, 052; in 
1964, 87,750; in 1965, 95, 793. In order to bring the townspeople an excellent selection we have 
increased the number of rented books to 400 a year. This rental system enables the townspeople to 
have current books, which can be changed each month, thus eliminating the need to purchase four or 
five of the best-selling novels. 



36 



On Patriot's Day, copies of the book, "A Day of Glory" were distributed to visitors at the 
groundbreaking ceremonies. This small paper-back book tells of the battle at the Concord bridge 
and gives Acton men their just recognition for the role they played in the first fight for independence. 

The Trustees are indebted to many groups and individuals of the Town. The Garden Club has 
provided floral arrangements all year. These add color and beauty to the main reading room. The 
Christmas decorations were beautiful, and we appreciate the time and care that the members of the 
Garden Club take to make these arrangements for us. The Friends of the Acton Libraries continue 
with their faithful support and the inestimable aid of volunteers. The Library obtains some of its 
financial support from trust funds, and as the addition nears completion any bequests or gifts which 
could be added would be very welcome. 

The resignation of Mrs. Louise M. Gardiner was accepted with sincere regret. Mrs. Gardiner 
has been a member of the Board for five years, and chairman during the busy year of 1964. 

1965 was a year of progress and accomplishment as evidenced by increased help, hours, and 
books. With the completion of the long-awaited addition, Acton will have library facilities commen- 
surate with its requirements. 

Earle W. Tuttle, Chairman 
Richard A. Bodge Doris E. Peterson 

Hayward S. Houghton Margaret Richter 

Dudley F. Howe Raymond A. Shamel 

Florence Merriam Marvin L. Tolf 

^ Trustees 

LIBRARY HOURS: Monday through Friday, 1 -9P.M., Saturday, 10A.M. - 6 P.M. 

STAFF: Marian L. Piper, Librarian 

Marion M. Armstrong, Assistant Librarian Frances Collins, General. Assistant 

Edna R. Custance, General Assistant Frances Livermore, Custodian 

ACCESSION: Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1965 22, 474 

Increase by purchase 1, 972 

Increase by gift . 129 

Withdrawn 521 

Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1966 24, 054 

CIRCULATION in 1965: Fiction - 37,471; Non -fiction - 20,538; Juvenile - 37,784; Total - 95, 793. 

Increase in circulation over 1964 - 7,943 volumes. 

FINES collected in 1965: $2, 121. 17. 

REPORT OF THE CITIZENS LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF WEST ACTON 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES: Edward Boyden, Barbara Nylander, Chairman, Percival Wood, Secretary. 

LIBRARY HOURS: Monday -7-9 P.M., Tuesday -3 -6 P.M., Thursday -3-5 P.M. 
Thelma Hermes, Librarian 

ACCESSION: Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1965 5, 751 

Increase by purchase 151 

Increase by gift 679 

Withdrawn 262 

Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1966 6, 319 

CIRCULATION in 1965: Fiction - 1,543; Non-fiction - 1,530; Juvenile - 3,359; Total-6,432 

Circulation in 1964: 5,898 

RECEIPTS: Fines and Miscellaneous - $115.43. 

In 1965, circulation again increased and especially active use was made of the Library by stu- 
dents. The Board of Trustees and I wish to express our thanks to the staff of the Acton Memorial 
Library and the Friends of the Acton- Libraries for their interest and assistance throughout the year, 
to the Acton Garden Club for plants donated, and to the many individuals who have given books and 
magazines to the Library. 

Thelma G. Hermes, Librarian 

37 



RECREATION 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

During 1965 the Town of Acton had the most successful recreation program in it's history. 
With the continued services of our Director, Robert Evans, we were able to expand the program 
from six to seven weeks. There was a 58 per cent increase in participation in 1965 versus 1964. 

Thanks to the voters of Acton we were able to purchase a jungle gym and overhead ladder 
which were very popular and should receive many years of service. We also purchased for the first 
time some baseball equipment which received a great deal of use since it is the most popular sport 
during the summer among the boys. 

For the first time in history our children traveled to surrounding towns and played baseball 
and tennis. In order to include as many children as possible we had two age groups for baseball, 
12 years and under and 13 and over. 

Three family nights drew over 400 people. These were held at Jones, Goward, and Gardner 
fields. We plan to make these annual events. 

In August the Walker Junior Playmakers, a theater group from Burlington, Mass., performed 
at Gardner Field West Acton. The productions were "The Kings Creampuff" which was a puppet 
show and a one act play entitled, "Tom Sawyer and Injun Joe". Admission was free and over 200 
children attended. 

Again a story hour was held once a week on the playgrounds under the direction of Mrs. 
Richter and these proved as popular as ever. 

Also in August the MDC Zoo visited us at Gardner Field, West Acton with over 250 people 
attending. Some of the children were allowed to bottle feed the animals and some of the more gentle 
animals were allowed to roam among the children. 

For five Wednesday afternoons the Recreation Commission sponsored a bowling program in 
which the participants paid a nominal fee to bowl, use bowling shoes and receive instruction. The 
average attendance was 47 youngsters, which we think is very good. 

The twilight basketball program was continued for both boys and girls. The games were 
played at the Florence Merriam School and most of the participants were between 15 and 19 years 
of age. We hope to further expand this program with the anticipated use of a new outdoor court 
being constructed at the new junior high school. 

In continuing our effort to provide recreation for more age groups in Acton, a Men's Twilight 
Softball League was developed. There were four teams entered and they played a six-game round 
robin schedule. We have great hopes of expanding this program to include more teams this year. 

Our tennis program was continued and again we were pleased with the interest and attend- 
ance. As mentioned earlier some of the tennis enthusiasts traveled to other towns to compete in 
organized matches. Again we thank the Acton Tennis Association for their support in our program. 

Despite the drought conditions swimming lessons were held at Walden Pond under the super- 
vision of the Walden District Water Safety Council of which Acton is a member. As in other years 
the number of children from Acton attending was large. 

Our special thanks to Allen Nelson of the Highway Department for his splendid cooperation 
and to the Rotary Club for their donation which paid for trophies and prizes which were given to the 
winners of the Olympics held at the end of the season. 

It is our hope that we may be able to expand our arts and crafts program because of its 
increasing popularity. The Recreation Commission would also like to expand the facilities by pur- 
chasing new equipment on a small steady basis. We also hope to improve the safety and quality of 
the playground areas that we have which would be a continuation of our program of the last four 
years. 



38 



Finally, we would like to extend our thanks to the Board of Selectmen and all the people who 
have helped us in any way. 

Charles W. Pappas, Chairman 
Gladys K. Mason 
William J. Phillips 
Martin Scanlan 




Charles Pappas, left, receiving Rotary 
Club donation for trophies and prizes 
from John LaFoley. 



William Phillips and Mrs. Doli Mason 
(seated) accept swimming registrations 
from Mrs. John Kardash and Harry Lahan. 



TOWN ADMINISTRATION 



Our first concern this year was the presentation of the Selectmen-Manager Plan at the Town 
Meeting in March. This article was favorably voted without amendments. 

After the resignation of William Chipman, the Moderator appointed William Allred and then 
Charles Grandy of the Finance Committee. The Moderator also appointed Mrs. Donald Perkins of 
the Planning Board to replace Richard Janson. 

On May 4, 1965, TASC met and elected Charles MacPherson, Chairman, and Mrs. Perkins, 
Clerk. At this meeting the question was discussed whether to submit the Town Manager article to 
the legislature for the 1965 session or hold it until the 1966 session. On the advice of Representa- 
tive Eaton, it was decided to wait for the latter session since the Committee on Towns had com- 
pleted its business sometime earlier. TASC could not have anticipated that this session would not 
prorogue before the next session was called. However, the bill has been filed for the 1966 session 
but we feel that there is slight possibility that it will be scheduled on the February calendar of the 
Committee on Towns. If this is the case, we cannot have the referendum printed on the ballot for 
the annual town elections in March, 1966. TASC has made tentative plans to contact the boards, 
organizations and public if the bill should be voted in the General Court and signed by the Govei-nor. 

TASC met with the Board of Selectmen to discuss those areas in which we could be of assist- 
ance to the Board. From this discussion came the study of a reconsideration article for our town 
bylaws and the suggestion that we explore the responsibilities of the Building Committee. 



/ 



39 



During the discussions on reconsideration, the Town Moderator, John Putnam, and Town 
Clerk, Charles MacRae met with us on several occasions. After evaluating many proposals and 
ideas, there was mutual agreement in support of the final draft of the article which was presented 
at the Special Town Meeting in November, 1965. This bylaw received a favorable vote at that time. 

TASC then turned to the study of the responsibilities of the Town Building Committee. After 
several joint meetings, it was agreed by both groups that the conclusions listed below were neces- 
sary to the proper functioning of the Building Committee. 

1. There should be a permanent site committee appointed by the Selectmen to consist of 
three members - one from the Building Committee and two members at large. This site committee 
should incorporate a long-range municipal site plan (including local schools) which should be based 
on professional advice. 

2. The municipal group requesting a new building should present its criteria, requirements 
and needs to the Town Meeting to obtain the voters approval and certification of the need to build 
this facility. 

3. After obtaining the favorable town vote, the municipal group should present its require - 
inents to the Building Committee. 

4. The Building Committee asks the next Town Meeting for finances for the preliminary plans. 

5. The Building Committee assists in the preparation of preliminary specifications; is gen- 
eral supervisor of design and construction (as authorised by the Town); interviews and employs all 
architects, and enters into contracts with the architects and general contractor. 

We urge that these recommendations be followed by town committees when working with the 
Building Committee. 

TASC has met nine times this year and will continue to help where needed. 

Charles D. MacPherson, Chairman 
Beatrice C. Perkins, Clerk 
Charles C. Grandy 
Clyde J. Home 
Chester H. Moody 



BYLAW COMMITTEE 



Appointed last April by the Selectmen to compile the town bylaws, the committee will com- 
plete its assigned task before this report reaches the voters. 

The records of every town meeting since the incorporation of the Town of Acton in 1735 up to 
the present time have been carefully read and the bylaws extracted. 

In the years from 1897 to the present, the printed Annual Town Reports contain both the war- 
rant for each meeting and the vote on each article, and these records are bound into convenient- 
sized volumes and available at the library, at Town Hall or from private citizens. Each member 
of the committee was assigned a ten -year segment to research at a time, and then this same period 
was. checked by a second rhember of the committee and also checked against Michael Foley's notes. 

The records for the years from 1735 to 1897 are all hand -written volumes and are available 
only from the vault at Town Hall. For this period, each member of the committee was assigned 
one volume from which to extract the bylaws. Because only one person was to research each vol- 
ume, our policy was to take extensive notes to be sure we had missed nothing and the whole com- 
mittee was then responsible for deciding what should be included in the final report. 

In the early years of Acton's history, town meetings were often held weekly. Through the 
years, the meetings became monthly or bi-monthly and finally evolved into the pattern of one annual 

40 



meeting and one or two special meetings each year as we know it today. The first 150 years of 
records contain relatively few bylaws, many of which are no longer in effect. Decisions were made 
by town meeting members to solve a particular problem, and each problem was dealt with on its 
own merits and on a short-term basis so that bylaws at that time were scarce. As the town grew 
in population and complexity, more rules and regulations were required, and the next fifty years 
up to 1935 reflected that growth, with the period from 1935 to the present showing perhaps the great- 
est changes. 

The committee, at this writing, is compiling a typewritten list of all of the bylaws found, 
whether still in effect or not. A second typing will delete all those which have been superseded by 
more recent regulations and will produce a final listing of the present bylaws, both chronologically 
and topically, which listing will later be printed in booklet form for easy reference. 

We have already submitted to the Selectmen a list of statutes which have been adopted by the 
Town. A secondary function of the committee will be to compile a list of street acceptances from 
1900 to the present. 

Each committee member has spent a minimum of 12 hours in research, and special credit 
goes to Mrs. Arthur Lee, who has spent closer to 50 hours in research. We have met as a group 
on an average of once a month since our appointment. The work is sometimes very slow, especially 
when the early, hand-written records are difficult to decipher, but never dull, and the whole com- 
mittee has genuinely enjoyed this opportunity to take a closer look at Acton's long and profitable 
history. 

Mrs. Walter Gates 

Mrs. Kenneth Hill 

Mrs. Robert Hoey 

Mrs. Arthur Lee 

Mrs. Roger Wootton 

Mrs. Kenneth Stowell, Chairman 



SEWERAGE STUDY 



The Sewerage Study Committee has met on a bi-weekly basis since its inception in 1964. 
This year the Committee prepared a questionnaire in order to ascertain the extent of the Acton 
sewage problem, which was reflected in the responses by the townspeople. A summary of the ques- 
tionnaire results is included at the conclusion of this report as Appendix A. The Housing and Home 
Finance Agency of the Federal Government advanced funds in the amount of $30,000 to the Town of 
Acton for an engineering study including mapping, preliminary plans and cost estimates for a town 
sewerage system. Following the notice of advance of funds, the firm of Metcalf and Eddy was 
awarded a contract in the amount of $16,000 for the performance of an engineering survey. 

An aerial mapping service submitted a proposal to perform photogrammetric services neces- 
sary to produce topographic maps of the Town of Acton as required for the engineering study. The 
proposal indicated that the services would be provided for in excess of $11,000. Research on the 
part of a Committee member revealed that aerial photographs of Acton were available from a Fed- 
eral Government agency. The photographs were secured and a professional cartographic firm 
(Crudall and Bemis) was retained to produce the required topographic maps at less than half the 
cost contained in the original proposal. Further, the topographic maps being prepared are fully 
coordinated with the Assessor's Atlas prepared by the Town Engineer. The total contracted obliga- 
tion of the Town for the Sewerage Study is now $21,500, whereas the advance of funds from the Fed- 
eral Government was in the amount of $30,000. 

The Sewerage Study Committee has called upon the various Town Committees and Boards to 
provide information to Metcalf and Eddy as to projected land use in the Town. Two meetings were 
conducted and various Town organizations provided data so as to bring up to date the projections 
contained in several master plan studies completed in 1960 and 1961. The Sewerage Study Commit- 
tee is cognizant of the fact that operations research methods have provided solutions to design and 
development problems involved in complex military command and control systems. The Committee 

41 



is considering applying for a foundation grant in order to finance a study applying these techniques 
to Acton's land -use requirements, population density and other conditions as they may exist in rela- 
tion to projected Town sewerage needs. 

The Sewerage Study Committee has undertaken to gather information relative to various ap- 
proaches that have been and are being taken to the sewage and garbage disposal problems. Some of 
these approaches have provided a source of revenue to the Town or Towns which have used them. 
The Sewerage Study Committee has and is currently investigating the possibility of securing Federal 
aid for the construction of sewerage facilities for the Town. Public Law 89-117 of the 86th Congress, 
passed in August 1965, may be applicable to supplement Public Law 660, thus providing Federal 
grants for from 30 to 50 per cent of the cost of various aspects of a Sewerage Treatment and Dis- 
posal System. The consulting engineer's study and the Committee recommendations will be com- 
pleted and ready to present to a Town Meeting in the middle of 1966. 

Due to the press of their business, Alton B. Avery and Bruce D. Smith submiitted their resig- 
nations and were replaced on the Committee by James S. Winston and Edward N. Patrick, respec- 
tively. 

Paul R. Nyquist, Chairman 

Hubert R. Durling, Jr. 

Robert J. Ellis 

Edward N. Patrick 

James S. Winston, Secretary 

Appendix A 

Summary Report on Sewerage Study Committee Questionnaire 

August 1965 

The Committee felt more details and statistics were necessary to support this study effort. 
After several months of deliberation and discussion with various town committees and officials, a 
questionnaire was carefully conapiled which considered the comments gleaned from the several 
meetings. At this time the Committee extends its appreciation to those members of the Board of 
Health and the League of Women Voters who' gave their time in assisting to formulate the questions 
that were used. It was desired to assimilate data from a concise group of questions which could be 
easily responded to by the hom.e owner without occupying his valuable time in study and research. 
These questions had to be specific in subject and general in nature so that all answers would have 
the sanne weight independent of the area of town or whether the husband or wife replied. 

When all of the details of composing, formatting, and printing were accomplished, the ques- 
tionnaires were bundled and taken to the post offices on 4 June 1965. The normal voter mailing 
requires approximately 3,000 units; however, the "printer" shorted our request so we could send 
only 2,739. The shortages were distributed among the three post offices. 

The returns were heavy and exceeded the returns normally anticipated from this type of poll 
or questionnaire. Eight hundred ninety-three (893) responses were received which reflects a 32.6% 
return. It further is interesting to note that of these responses, 373 took time to write a note or 
comment. The response to each particular question follows: 

YES NO 

1. Do you believe that the presence of raw sewage presents 

a danger to the health of Actonians? 646 189 

2. Has a miember of your family had hepatitis while living 

in Acton? 22 859 

3. Have you seen or smelled evidence of sewage on the sur- 
face of the ground in your neighborhood? 452 420 

4. Do you know of any septic system failures, such as: 

Overflow at leach field 427 247 

Backed-up into house 304 247 

Evidence in a stream - 168 325 

5. What type of sewage system do you have at your residence? 

Cesspool 226 

Septic tank 69 5 

Other 15 

42 



NO 



6. How often do you have it cleaned? YES 

1 year 117 

2 years 222 

3 years 162 
More 251 

7. Do you believe that there is a problem in proper sewage 

disposal in Acton? 564 228 

8. Remarks: 

It should be noted that no attempt is made to correlate totals of any specific question with the 
total returns because several persons did not complete the questionnaire in every detail. 

In analyzing the remarks, the committee grouped or categorized the statements so as to try 
to provide a meaningful statistical summary. The individuals who wrote remarks may find it diffi- 
cult to understand into which group their comments were counted. In reviewing such a volume of 
comments the analysis decision was many times more difficult to make. 

a. Concern about; 

(1) Population growth 19 

(2) Soil conditions in Acton 6 

(3) Unrestrained building of houses 4 

(4) Sewage problems 52 

(5) Stream pollution 15 

(6) Water shortage 6 

(7) Cost of sewerage 18 

b. Critical about: 

(1) Town government 3 6 

(2) Installation of septic systems 15 

(3) The questionnaire 22 

(4) A sewerage system for Acton 14 

c. Interest in: 

(1) Sewerage for Acton as soon as possible 92 

(2) Sewerage for Acton eventually 11 

(3) Limitation of building of houses 3 

The questionnaires as returned are available to interested Town officials so that steps may be 
taken to improve or otherwise correct conditions which were identified or described in the survey 
returns. 

The Committee was interested in the comments and in the participation by so many residents 
of the Town of Acton. They reflect an interest in and an awareness of a vital issue of the Town and 
its affect on each of us. 



CONSERVATION 



Of great importance to conservation interests during 1965 was the passage of the Hatch Act 
in June. This act relates to the protection of inland waters, and outlines certain procedures which 
must be followed before any alteration of these waters can be effected. The Commission has noti- 
fied the Selectmen and the Department of Natural Resources as a result of on-the-spot inspection of 
certain filling projects along the Town Brooks. Members of the Commission have attended and will 
continue to attend hearings on Hatch Act cases, and will maintain an active interest in their disposal. 

Also of importance du'ring the past year was the formation of the Water Resources Study Com- 
mittee. Channing Waldron is a member of this group. 

In August the Commission purchased thirteen and one half acres of land from Mr. and Mrs. 
Crimens Pacy. This land is adjacent to the Town Forest in West Acton and provides a long sought 
access to it. Initial approval has been received from the Commonwealth which will return to the 

43 



Town one half the purchase price for this land. The Commission is continuing its efforts to pui - 
chase Will's Hole adjacent to the North Acton Town Forest. This is a unique quaking bog and is 
partially owned by Joseph Britt. Also of concern is an interesting swamp land area in South Acton 
owned by Stanley B. Johnson and the Steinmann Estate. The Commission is interested in the pur- 
chase or gift of any parcels of land which would serve conservations ends and welcomes the sugges- 
tions of the townspeople. 

Further progress was achieved during the year to preserve the Isaac Davis Trail. Two ease- 
ments were obtained and others are pending. Robert Ellis is serving as a member of the Sewerage 
Study Committee, and valuable information has been exchanged between the two bodies. 

Several members have attended the meetings of the Massachusetts Association of Conservation 
Commissions. Channing Waldron, Jr. was appointed to fill the expired term of James Shepard and 
Richard H. Murphy was appointed to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of Kenneth E. Jewell. 

Robert J. Ellis, Chairman 
John A. Jeffries, Jr., Clerk 
William A. Kingman 
Mrs. David L. May 
Richard H. Murphy 
David P. Tinker 
Channing Waldron, Jr. 



TOWN FOREST 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Clearing of underbrush and fallen trees from the fire lanes in the Texas Lot was done this 
year. In addition, a bulldozer was rented to grub out stumps and boulders to make the fire lanes 
passable for fire equipment. 

Boy Scouts as well as other groups continue to use the Town Forest for Camping and recrea- 
tional activities. 

Franklin H. Charter 
Arno H. Perkins 

Emery Nelson 



TREE WARDEN 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Our tree planting program was started in April. Approximately 60 trees were planted along 
town ways. Dry growing conditions the past two years have necessitated replanting of about 10 per 
cent of these new trees. 

Most of the branches and tops of trees broken by the ice storm of December 1964 have now 
been removed. A number of weak and diseased trees have also been taken down. 

Franklin H. Charter 



44 



MOTH SUPERINTENDENT 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

A foliage spray for the control of the elm leaf beetle was applied to the elms in June of 1965. 
Wild cherry and fruit trees along the streets were also sprayed to control tent caterpillers and 
canker worms. 

The department removed fifty-one diseased elms in 1965. There are about ten diseased elms 
to be removed before April 1, 1966. 

Franklin H. Charter 



ARCHIVES 



^JffiS^jV^Krf VSQfiriAjA^Ub^^. 




The Departure of the Minutemen, Acton - April 19, 
Painting by Arthur F. Davis 1894 



1775 



During the year the Committee has met several times and for the most part the work of this 
Committee has been of a routine nature in connection with compiling records and papers of the Town. 

Also during the year the Committee collected many old papers and books of a former Trea- 
surer from the attic of the old South Acton Fire Station, and thirty volumes of a former Town 
Accountant records which have been placed in the Town vault at the South Fire Station. These 
records and papers will have to be sorted and those that have any value will be retained. 

The Committee plans to confer with the heads of several Departments to see if they have any 
records or papers that should be microfilmed this coming year. Also the Committee plans to con- 
fer with an official from the Graphic Microfilm Company to plan a long range program for putting 
Town Records on microfilm. 

Frederick S. Kennedy 
Joyce H. Woodhead 
David L. May 



k 



45 



VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

There have been seven interments of United States War Veteran's in the Acton Cemeteries 
during the year 1965. The names of the Veteran's, the dates and place of burials are as follows: 




Charles Judd Farley (W.W. I) 

Otis J. Reed (W.W. I) 

Harry Snyer (W.W. II) 

Leon Emerson (W.W. I) 

George Howard Reed (W.W. I) 

Lysander S. Nowell (W.W.I) 

Winthrop S. Warren (W.W.I) 



Jan. 15, 1965 Woodlawn Cemetery 

Jan. 19, 1965 Woodlawn Cemetery 

Feb. 18, 1965 Woodlawn Cemetery 

June 5, 1965 Woodlawn Cemetery 

Nov. 23, 1965 Mt. Hope Cemetery 

Nov. 27, 1965 Mt. Hope Cemetery 

Dec. 22, 1965 Woodlawn Cemetery 



Fred S. Kennedy 

Registrar of Veteran's Graves 



Captain Isaac Davis Monument 



CEMETERY 



The Cemetery Department has charge of the care and maintenance of Woodlawn, Mount Hope 
and Forest Cemeteries, the Capt. Robbins Lot and Monument, the Memorial Chapel and its sur- 
roundings, the Luther and Calvin Blanchard Lot and Memorial, and also the Memorial in front of 
the birthplace of Capt. Isaac Davis on Arlington Street. 

Besides the routine maintenance of the cemeteries, the Department has completed several 
projects this past year. In Woodlawn Cemetery another new section has been leveled and made 
ready for seeding in the spring, also roads in this section have been laid out and will be ready for 
gravel and oiling this coming year. The surface drainage project has been continued by adding two 
more catch basins. Plans have been made to oil the roads in this cemetery this coming year and 
the cost of this work will be covered from cemetery funds. Also the planting of trees and shrubs in 
the new sections will be paid from the beautification funds. 

In Mt. Hope Cemetery the hedge on the South Acton side was removed and 750 feet of chain 
link fence was installed. This has made a great improvement in the appearance of that section of 
the cemetery. Three more new sections have been made and graded and seeded. The roads in 
these sections were in the process of being laid out, when Mr. Dowd, the Town Engineer resigned 
and this work will have to be done in the spring. 

Most all the roads in Mt. Hope are oiled and as soon as the new roads have been made ready 
they will be oiled. This work was accomplished with the fine cooperation of the Highway Department 
thereby keeping the cost of the oiling down to a minimum. 

Alsd the program of removing corner posts in the old parts of the cemeteries has been con- 
tinued and this will help cut down the cost of maintenance. 

The Trustees of the Varnum Tuttle Fund have expended over $6,000 this past year on the fol- 
lowing repairs to the Memorial Chapel: the two rear granite stairways had to be taken down, relaid 



46 



and repointed; waterproofing the outside walls; oiling the roads around the Chapel; miscellaneous 
repairs inside of the building, and the maintenance of the grounds and shrubs. The Board wishes 
to thank the Trustees of this fund for their fine cooperation and the resulting saving to the taxpaying 
citizens of the Town. 

Under the new Pesticide Law it became necessary for the Superintendent and Foreman to take 
a State Examination to obtain a license to handle pesticides in the cemeteries. Both the Superintend- 
ent and the Foreman have attended a convention for cemetery departments. They report that they 
have benefited by attending and learning about the new types of equipment used by other departments. 

The Board has inserted an article again this year asking for favorable action to the building of 
a combination garage and office building for this department. Since the fall of 1962 we have been 
able to keep the dump truck in the West Acton Fire Station with the permission of the Fire Chief, but 
in the very near future, the Fire Department will have to use this space. The tractor, compressor, 
mowers, liner's work shop, and equipment used in interments are all in the basement of the chapel. 
The family room of the Memorial Chapel is used as an office. This room is supposed to be used by 
the family of the deceased when services are held in the Chapel. 

In 1962 the Cemetery Commissioners met with the then Board of Selectmen, and both Boards 
agreed that both the garaging of the truck and office space would be ternporary and that something 
would be done about a building for this department. Last year the Trustees of the Varnum Tuttle 
Fund sent a letter to this Board requesting that all the equipment be removed from the cellar as 
soon as possible and that the family room be used for the purpose for which it was intended. Re- 
cently the Chapel was inspected by the Fire Underwriters and they were severe in their criticism 
of the storage of the equipment in the basement and they could not understand why the department 
did not have a proper garage. The Commissioners feel very strongly that this combination garage 
and office building should be located in Woodlawn Cemetery, as close to the scene of operation as 
possible, When a lot owner, a monument man or a funeral director is seeking information in regard 
to matters concerning cemeteries, he expects to find the office in the cemetery. Also the equipment 
should be close by and be available when needed thereby cutting to a minimum the man hours required 
for efficient operation of the equipment. 

The Town Building Committee has met several times and they expect to have ready for the 
Annual Town Meeting the plans, specifications and cost of such a building to present to the Town for 
consideration. 

At this time the Commissioners would like to call attention to the fine cooperation this Board 
has received from the Town departments, and to thank the employees of the Cemetery Department 
for their fine work during the year. 

Harlan E. Tuttle 
Howard F. Jones 
Donald O. Nylander 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Personnel Board is unanimous in support of the 3% general increase for "Covered" em- 
ployees. We feel this is necessary to keep our people in their respective position relative to other 
towns. 

The Personnel Board is also unanimous in 'Support of the liberalization of sick leave accumu- 
lation from I day per month to one day per month with the maximum accumulation raised from 18 
days to 24 days. Furthermore, we are proposing that for each day accumulated at the start of a 
single, continuous, prolonged illness an employee receive three days of sick leave, if necessary. 
This is designed to help take care of a serious prolonged illness and at the same time provide an 
incentive to conserve sick leave for a real need. 



47 



We ar'e reviewing with Department Heads the job writeups and classification of all covered 
jobs. It is important periodically to review and revise if necessary this information to keep it 
current. 

During the year we have met with most of the Town Departments on personnel policies and 
problems. 

Lyman H. Goff 

Clyde J. Home 

Donald L. Loring 

Wilbur J. Tolman 

William H. Kemp, Chairman 



VETERANS AGENT 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The Department of Veterans' Services is maintained for the purpose of furnishing such infor- 
mation, advice and assistance to veterans as may be necessary to enable them to procure the bene- 
fits to which they are or may be entitled relative to employment, vocational or other educational 
opportunities, hospitalization, medical care, pensions and other veterans benefits both at the state 
and federal level. 

The Veterans' Agent acts for the Selectmen in the disbursement of veterans' benefits, makes 
such investigation of the necessities and qualification of the claimant as to prevent the payment of 
any such benefits contrary to any provision of Chapter 115 of the General Laws. 

Nine cases were aided for the year ending December 31, 1965 with either permanent or tem- 
porary financial or medical assistance. During the year I was able to obtain a federal pension for 
one permanent case, thereby reducing the permanent case load to three cases being assisted per- 
manently. 

It was necessary during the year to request a transfer from the Reserve Fund the sum of 
$1,590 to meet extraordinary and unforeseen medical expenses. 

The following is a general breakdown of expenditures into specific categories under Veterans' 
Benefits. 

Ordinary Benefits and Fuel $3, 899. 50 

Hospitalization and Doctor 5, 804. 45 

Medication and Miscellaneous 218. 85 

$9, 922. 80 

One -half of the amounts of Veterans' Benefits paid shall be reimbursed by the Comimonwealth 
to the Town on or before November tenth in the year following such expenditures. 

Norman L. Roche 
Veterans' Agent 



48 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 

To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

For the year ending December 31, 1965, there were five accidents reported from the follow- 
ing departments: Acton School Department - 1; Tree & Moth Department - 1; Highway Department 
3. All of these required medical attention only and have been settled except one injury that still 
necessitates the loss of time due to multiple fractures and will need considerable medical rehabili- 
tation. 

TheronA. Lowden 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 



INSURANCE 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The passage of Senate Bill 417 on June 12, 1964, which required towns to provide defense and 
indemnity for teachers involved in personal claims arising from negligence of such teacher or other 
acts of his resulting in accidental bodily injury or accidental damage to property, made it advisable 
to add insurance protection for this exposure. This was done by broadening the coverage of the 
Town's existing Liability Policy at an annual cost of about $230. This same policy was also expanded 
to provide Owners' Protective Liability during construction of the Elementary School off Elm Street. 
This type of coverage has been previously included as part of the contract cost and purchased by the 
builder. The cost was $164. 

The requirement of the contract for the new school and the library addition also added an un- 
expected $966 and $276 respectively to cover the Builder's Risk Fire and Extended Coverage and 
Vandalism insurance so that we were forced to ask for an additional appropriation for 1965. In 
November, an adjustment of insurance values on town buildings increased the total by roughly 
$100,000. 

There is a very substantial increase in our 1966 budget request, which is primarily attribu- 
table to new construction on the school building and the library additions. The fire insurance costs 
can be reasonably predicted, but in Workmen's Compensation and Automobile coverages where the 
rates are predicated on experience, it is impossible to guarantee in October the accuracy of our 
request. Our aim is to allow a reasonable margin for increased personnel, additional vehicles and 
possible rate adjustments. 

We have but one recommendation; namely, to extend the terms of the Liability Insurance so 
that the operations of the highway and other departments will be covered. At present, only accidents 
within the buildings are included in the basic policy. 

Raymond A. Gallant 

Charles MacRae 

David P. Tinker 

Theron Lowden 

Thomas Motley, Chairman 



49 



TOWN EMPLOYEES INSURANCE COMMITTEE 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Last year the Committee recommended the acceptance of Section 9A of Chapter 32B of the 
General Laws which the Town voted to accept at the Annual Town Elections in March. 

The provisions of this law were implemented in June of this year to provide that the Town 
pay half the Blue Cross and Blue Shield carried by a retired employee. 

David W. Scribner 
Viola Foley 
Carolyn Douglas 
Arno Perkins 
Stewart F. Kennedy 



GOODNOW FUND 



For the year ending December 31, 1965 

INVESTMENTS 

Charlestown Savings Bank 
Concord Co-operative Bank 

RECEIPTS 

Charlestown Savings Bank 
Concord Co-operative Bank 

EXPENDITURES 

Treasurer of the Evangelical Church in Acton 

Town of Acton for perpetual care of Goodnow Lot in Woodlawn Cemetery 



$ 465. 


54 








3, 000. 


00 


$3, 


465. 


54 


$ 19. 


76 








123. 


76 


$ 


143. 


52 


$ 123. 


52 








20. 


00 


$ 


143. 


52 



Thelma L. Boatman, Tr. 
Clark C. McElvein 
James N. Gates 
Trustees 



ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 



For the year ending December 31, 1965 

The Trustees of this fund have signed orders to the Town Treasurer, totaling $825.00, (Eight 
hundred and twenty-five dollars). 

Hazel P. Vose 
Eleanor P. Wilson 
Helen B. Wood 
Trustees 



50 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 



In 1965 we had the first start of construction on planned industrial sites. The New England 
Telephone Company contracted for a service building on the Craig land on School Street, called 
Williamsburg Park. It will be completed and occupied this spring. Now 11,000 sq. ft. of floor area, 
it has two cement-block sides for future expansion. This developer has other prospects now dis- 
cussing possible buildings. 

Numerous companies located here or started small businesses in buildings that were empty, 
particularly in South Acton. Part of the Technology Instrument Corporation property has been filled. 
The Rex property has been purchased by Haartz Auto Fabric Company and will be occupied soon. 

We have spent considerable time with industrialists looking for new locations and with some 
industrial realtors. Mr. John Shyne, the industrial development manager for Boston Edison Com- 
pany, has been most helpful in sending us leads. 

We have met a few stumbling blocks that we have mentioned before. Small prospective buyers 
find the cost of industrial land in Acton too high. The water commissioners keep telling us that they 
can not add an appreciable load to the present system, yet housing developments are added without 
question. This water situation has deterred a company planning to build a 240,000 sq. ft. plant 
from making a decision in our favor. 

We believe something drastic should be done about our'water situation. Incorporating the 
Water District into the Town government as a department seems imperative. It would appear that 
having the Water District part of the Town government, and therefore having their budget voted at 
Town Meetings, would enlighten the citizenry and obtain help in finding new water resources. Seri- 
ous consideration should be given to obtaining water from Lake Nagog because the legislative ena- 
bling act still gives Acton and Littleton prior rights, if needed. 

Frederick H. Bubier 
Allen M. Christofferson 
Ralph C. Morse 
Richard J. O'Neil 
Stephen E. Lord, Chairman 




Industry in Acton - Air Reduction Company 



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56 



DOG LICENSES 



ALL DOG LICENSES HERE LISTED EXPIRE 
MARCH 3 1, 1966. 

DOGS MUST BE LICENSED ON OR BEFORE 
APRIL 1ST OR THE OWNERS OR KEEPERS 
THEREOF ARE LIABLE TO A FINE. 

THE LAW APPLIES TO ALL DOGS THREE 
MONTHS OLD OR OVER, REGARDLESS OF 
TIME OF YEAR OWNERSHIP IS ACQUIRED. 

NO TAX BILLS ARE SENT TO OWNERS OF 
DOGS. 



REPORT OF DOG LICENSES 
ISSUED IN 1965 

754 Licenses @$ 2.00 $1,508.00 

100 Licenses @ 5.00 500.00 

9 Licenses @ 10. 00 90.00 

3 Licenses @ 25. 00 75.00 

2 Licenses @ 50.00 100.00 

40 Duplicate tags and transfers @ ■ .25 10. 00 

Paid to Town Treasurer $2, 283. 00 



DOG OFFICER 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Calls and complaints handled 237 

Stray dogs picked up 28 

Dogs returned to owner 21 

Dogs disposed of 7 

Carl W. Flint 
Dog Officer 



57 



TOWN ELECTION 



March 1, 1965 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Whole number of votes cast 465 492 778 1735 

MODERATOR, one year 

James Edward Kinsley 201 235 353 789 

JohnW. Putnam 255 245 419 919 

Blanks 9 12 6 27 

TOWN CLERK, one year 

Charles M. MacRae 440 448 730 1618 

Blanks 25 44 48 117 

SELECTMAN, three years 

Mary Kenan Hadley 259 250 435 944 

Richard C. Janson 187 231 316 734 

Scattered -. . 4 - 3 4 11 

Blanks 15 8 23 46 

ASSESSOR, three years 

Dewey E. Boatman 413 427 710 1550 

Blanks 52 65 68 185 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE, three years 

Clinton S. Curtis 424 419 719 1562 

Blanks 41 73 59 173 

TREASURER and COLLECTOR, one year 

Wm. Henry Soar 427 441 717 1585 

Blanks 38 51 61 150 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE, three years 

Parker Harrison, Jr 334 342 553 1229 

Thomas E. Wetherbee 341 382 574 1297 

Ahti E. Autio 105 103 212 420 

John F. Marten 91 91 161 343 

Blanks 59 66 56 181 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE, two years 

Michael P. Diamantopoulos .- 131 116 204 451 

George E. Neagle 293 327 541 1161 

Blanks 41 49 33 123 

CONSTABLES, one year 

Edward J. Collins, Jr 408 426 674 1508 

Chauncey R. Fenton, Jr 422 434 694 1550 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy 417 421 697 1535 

David W. Scribner 423 427 686 1536 

Blanks 190 260 361 811 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONER, three years 

Donald O. Nylander 43 2 431 728 1591 

Blanks 33 61 50 144 

BOARD OF HEALTH, three years 

Marcia Jean Harris 420 417 703 1540 

Blanks 45 75 75 195 



58 



BOARD OF HEALTH, one year 

J. Huston Westover 428 

Blanks 37 

TRUSTEE of MEMORIAL LIBRARY, three years 

Louise M. Gardiner 424 

Blanks 41 

PLANNING BOARD, five years 

Beatrice C. Perkins 403 

Scattered 

Blanks 62 

PLANNING BOARD, four years 

Charles D. O'Neal, Jr 402 

Blanks 63 

PLANNING BOARD, two years 

Ellen C. Bryant 301 

Aram T. Kevorkian 123 

Blanks 41 

PLANNING BOARD, one year 

Timothy McCrudden 168 

Charles E. Orcutt, Jr 217 

Blanks 80 

TREE WARDEN, one year 

Franklin H. Charter 432 

Blanks 33 

QUESTION 

Yes 231 

No 193 

Blanks 41 



437 


730 


1595 


55 


48 


140 


418 


705 


1547 


74 


73 


188 


408 


678 


1489 




7 


7 


84 


93 


239 


407 


679 


1488 


85 


99 


247 


197 


398 


896 


220 


286 


629 


75 


94 


210 


174 


294 


636 


239 


371 


827 


79 


113 


272 


427 


721 


1580 


65 


57 


155 


247 


400 


878 


175 


317 


685 


70 


61 


172 




Election Officers at the polls for Precinct 3. 
(Left to right): Mrs. Mary Tuttle, Mrs. Barbara 
McPhee, Mrs. Claire Peterson, Mrs. Minnie Veasie 



59 



Town Meeting 
1 965 




Charles M. MacRae, Town Clerk (left! 
and Town Moderator John Putnam 





WM 




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MacPh 



their 
erson 



views, left to right, Mrs. Edith Stowell, James Kinsley, Charles 
(William Chipman in foreground), and John McLaughlin. 




Fred Kennedy is placing his "yes" or 
"no" in the Town Meeting ballot box, 
with Mrs. Phyllis Sprague (left) and 
Mrs. Eleanor Wilson checking off 
names against the Precinct 3 lists. 




Gordon Platine expresses his views. 



60 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 8, 1965 



Article 1. 

ELECTED: Hazel P. Vose trustee of the Elizabeth White Fund for three years. 

ELECTED: Arno H. Perkins trustee of the West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund for 
three years. 

ELECTED: Frederick T. Kennedy trustee of the Acton Firemen's Relief Fund for 
three years. 

ELECTED: James N. Gates trustee of the Goodnow Fund for three years. 

ELECTED: Edward F. Boyden trustee of the Citizenis Library Association of West 
Acton for three years. 

VOTED: That the compensation of Elected Officers of the Town of Acton for the 
calendar year 1965 be as follows: 

Moderator: $20.00 per each night per meeting. 

Board of Selectmen: 

Chairman $ 550. 00 

Clerk 550. 00 

Member 550. 00 

Town Treasurer and Collector 6, 775. 00 

Town Clerk 2, 150. 00 

Board of Assessors: 

Chairman 1, 600. 00 

Clerk 1, 200. 00 

Member 1, 200. 00 

Board of Public Welfare: 

Chairman 150. 00 

Member 100. 00 

Member 100. 00 

Board of Health: 

Chairman 150. 00 

Member 100. 00 

Member 100. 00 

Tree Warden: At the rate of $2.60 per hour from January 1, 1965 to March 31, 1965 
and $2.70 per hour from April 1, 1965 to December 31, 1965, plus $.75 per hour for 
the use of his truck. 

Article 2: REPORTS 

VOTED: To accept the several reports of the Town Officers and Boards. 

Article 3. 

VOTED: That the report of the Committee on Town Administration as printed in the 
Annual Town Report, changing, the first sentence by deleting 1963 and inserting 1964, 
be accepted as a report of progress, and that the Committee continue its study. 

61 



Article 4: PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend Section 7 of the Town Bylaws, entitled "Person- 
nel Bylaw for Wage and Salary Determination and Administration" by increasing by 
an approximate 4% the figures in Schedule A, Schedule B and Schedule C, to be effec 
tive April 1, 1965 a copy of the revised figures to be submitted by the Personnel 
Board to the Town Clerk at its earliest convenience. 

Article 5: BYLAWS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Bylaws of the Town of Acton, Section 7, 
entitled "Personnel Bylaw for Wage and Salary Determination and Administration" 
by removing from Schedule B S6 3804 (Board of Health) and inserting in Schedule B 
S12 3804A Agent (Board of Health) 40 hours $2.61 $2.73 $2.86 $2.99 $3.13. 

Article 6: BYLAWS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Bylaws of the Town of Acton, Section 7, 
entitled "Personnel Bylaw for Wage and Salary Determination and Administration" 
by inserting in Schedule C 1 S 8 Recreation Director P. T. $2.06 $2.15 $2.26 
$2.36 $2.47. 

Article 7: BYLAWS 

VOTED: To amend Section 7 of the Town Bylaws entitled "Personnel Bylaw for 
Wage and Salary Determination and Administration" by removing from Section 8 the 
following: "If a Holiday falls on a Saturday which is not a regularly scheduled work 
day, it will not be paid for", and inserting in Section 8 the following: "If a Holiday 
falls on a scheduled day off, a permanent Full Time employee will be given an addi- 
tional day off -- at the convenience of the department", effective April 1, 1965. 



VOTED 
VOTED 
VOTED 



Article 8: BUDGET 

To amend Item #103 by striking out $2,835.00 and inserting $3,342.00. 
To amend Item #104 by striking out $975.00 and inserting $1,106.00. 



To raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 1965 recom- 
mended by the Finance Committee to defray the expenses of the departments of the 
Town as indicated with each numbered item to be considered a separate appropriation 

General Government 

Moderator: 

1. Salary $ 160.00 

Finance Committee: 

2. Expenses 200. 00 

1, 650. 00 
3, 800. 00 

3, 500. 00 
3, 000. 00 
1,000.00 

62 



Selectm 


en: 


3. 


Salaries 


4. 


Expenses 


5. 


Capital Outlay 


6. 


Legal Services 


7. 


Extra Legal Services 


8. 


Appraisals 



Town Office Clerical Staff: 
9. Salaries 

Engineering Department: 

10. Salaries and Wages 

11. Expenses 

Town Accountant: 

12. Salary 

13. Expenses 

Town Treasurer and Collector: 

14. Salary 

15. Expenses 

Town Assessors: 

16. Salaries 

17. Expenses 

Town Clerk: 

18. Salary 

19. Expenses 

20. 1965 State Census 

Election and Registration: 

21. Salaries and Wages 

22. Expenses 

Planning Board: 

23. Expenses 

Personnel Board: 

24. Expenses 

Board of Appeals: 

25. Expenses 

Industrial Development Commission: 

26. Expenses 

Conservation Commission: 

27. Expenses 

Archives Committee: 

28. Expenses 

Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee: 

29. Expenses 

Buildings and Grounds: 

30. Salaries and Wages 

31. Expenses 

32. Capital Outlay 

Town Report Committee: 

33. Expenses 

Total General Government 



$ 31, 415. 00 

14, 480. 00 

1, 900. 00 

2, 700. 00 
170. 00 



6, 775. 00 
2, 800. 00 



4, 000. 00 
2, 200. 00 

2, 150. 00 

500. 00 

2. 500. 00 

1, 825. 00 

2, 500. 00 

1, 500. 00 

650. 00 

25. 00 

650. 00 

300. 00 

61. 00 

1, 000. 00 

6, 510. 00 
10, 735. 00 

1, 150. 00 

2, 415. 00 



$114, 221. 00 



63 



Protection of Persons and Property 



Police Department: 

34. Salaries and Wages 

35. Expenses 

36. Capital Outlay 

Fire Department: 

37. Salaries and Wages 

38. Expenses 

39. Capital Outlay 

Sealer of Weights and Measures: 

40. Salary and Travel 

41. Expenses 

Moth Department: 

42. Wages 

43. Expenses 

Town Forest Committee: 

44. Maintenance 

Tree Department: 

45. Wages 

46. Expenses 

Wire Inspector: 

47. Wages and Travel 

48. Expenses 

Inspector of Gas Piping and Appliances: 

49. Wages 

50. Expenses 

Building Inspector and Agent for Enforcement 
of Zoning Bylaws: 

51. Salary and Wages 

52. Expenses 

Dog Officer: 

53. Wages and Travel 

Building Conamittee: 

54. Expenses 

Civil Defense: 

55. Expenses 



77, 570. 00 
10, 125. 00 

2, 000. 00 

75, 310. 00 

36, 634. 00 

970. 00 

365. 00 
60. 00 

3, 915. 00 

2, 000. 00 

100. 00 

3, 610. 00 

1, 900. 00 

2, 000. 00 

25. 00 

1, 000. 00 
100. 00 



6, 490. 00 
1, 115. 00 

520. 00 

50. 00 

265. 00 



Total Protection of Persons and Property 



$226, 124. 00 



Highways 



Highways: 
56. 
57. 
58. 
59. 
60. 



General Highway Maintenance 

Drainage 

Chapter 81 Highways 

Chapter 90 Highways 

Snow Removal 



14, 885. 00 
11, 012. 00 
19, 250. 00 
4, 500. 00 
40, 500. 00 



64 



61. Traffic Signs and Lines 

62. Vacations and Holidays 

63. Sidewalk Maintenance 

64. Highway Machinery Maintenance 

65. Street Lighting 

66. Capital Outlay 

Town Dump: 

67. Salaries 

68. Expenses 



4, 560. 00 
3, 220. 00 

500. 00 

12, 900. 00 

16, 500. 00 

2, 125. 00 

5, 665. 00 
1, 600. 00 



Total Highways 



$137, 217. 00 



Health and Sanitation 



Health and Sanitation: 

69. Salaries 

70. Expenses 

71. Garbage Collections 

Inspector of Animals: 

72. Wages 

73. Expenses 

Plumbing Inspector: 

74. Wages 

Total Health and Sanitation 



13. 


095. 


00 










11, 


095. 


00 










13, 


650. 

150. 
30. 


00 

00 
00 










2, 


000. 


00 
















$ 


40, 


020. 


00 



Charities 



District and Local Welfare: 

75. Administration Salaries 

76. Public Assistance 



200. 00 
50. 000. 00 



Total Charities 



$ 50, 200. 00 



Veterans Aid 



Veterans Services 

77. Salary 

78. Expenses 

79. Aid 



1, 775. 00 

275. 00 

8, 500. 00 



Total Veterans Aid 



$ 10, 550. 00 



Education 



Local Schools: 

80. Instruction 

81. Plant Operation and Maintenance 

82. Transportation 



460, 564. 00 
51, 937. 00 
53, 980. 00 



65 



83. Non -Instructional Services 

84. Administration 

85. Blanchard Auditorium 

86. Capital Outlay 

87. Contingency Fund 

Total Local Schools 



$ 6, 450. 00 

13, 400. 00 

10, 500. 00 

3, 540. 00 

1. 000. 00 

$601, 371. 00 



Regional Schools: 

88. Instruction 

89. Plant Operation and Maintenance 

90. Transportation 

91. Non-Instructional Services 

92. Administration 

93. Blanchard Auditorium 

94. Capital Outlay 

95. Athletic Fund 

96. Contingency Fund 

Total Regional Schools 
Total Education 



423, 809. &5 

37, 799. 13 

20, 305. 03 

15, 535. 84 

14, 022. 48 

6, 180. 76 

881. 20 

8, 093. 91 

532. 17 

$527, 160. 17 



$1, 128, 531. 17 



Libraries 



Memorial Library: 

97. Salaries and Wages 

98. Expenses 

99. Books 

100. Capital Outlay 

West Acton Library: 

101. Salaries and Wages 

102. Expenses 

Total Libraries 



13, 050. 00 

4, 760. 00 

9, 000. 00 

300. 00 

645. 00 
750. 00 



28, 505. 00 



Recreation 



Playgrounds: 

103. Wages 

104. Expenses 

105. Capital Outlay 

Total Recreation 



3, 342. 00 

1, 106. 00 

500. 00 



4, 948. 00 



Cemeteries 



Cemeteries: 

106. Salaries and Wages 

107, Expenses 



19, 300. 00 
3, 766. 00 



66 



108. Capital Outlay 
Total Cemeteries 



900. 00 



$ 23, 966. 00 



Insurance 



Insurance: 

109. Workman's Compensation 

110. Surety Bond 

111. Fire Insurance for Town Buildings 

112. Boiler and Machinery 

113. Motor Vehicle Liability 

114. Money and Securities 

115. Group Health 

116. Fire Fighters Insurance 

Total Insurance 



5, 000. 00 

500. 00 
5, 100. 00 

720. 00 
3, 340. 00 

150. 00 
9, 200. 00 

390. 00 



24, 400. 00 



Pensions 



Pension Fund: 

117. Expenses 

Total Pension 



16, 835. 00 



16, 835. 00 



Maturing Debt and Interest 



Regional School: 

118. Maturing Debt 

119. Interest 

Julia McCarthy Elementary School: 

120. Maturing Debt 

121. Interest 

Julia McCarthy School Addition: 

122. Maturing Debt 

123. Interest 

Florence E. Merriam School: 

124. Maturing Debt 

125. Interest 

South Acton Fire Station: 

126. Maturing Debt 

127. Interest 

Chapters 81 and 90 Highways: 

128. Maturing Debt 

129. Interest 



71, 499. 56 
88, 008. 79 



15, 000. 00 
2, 200. 00 



10, 000. 00 
780. 00 



45, 000. 00 
18, 900. 00 



12, 000. 00 
600. 00 



41, 075. 00 
835. 02 



67 



Elementary School Land: 

130. Maturing Debt 

131. Interest 

Police Station: 

132. Maturing Debt 

133. Interest 

Anticipation of Revenue Notes: 

134. Interest 

New Elementary School: 

135. Interest 

Library Addition: 

136. Interest 

Total Maturing Debt and Interest 
Grand Total 



$ 40, 000. 00 
868. 69 



20, 000. 00 
2. 800. 00 



1, 800. 00 



16. 000. 00 



3. 000. 00 



390, 367. 06 
$2, 195, 884. 23 



Special Articles 

Art. 9. Revaluation 

10. New Way and High Street (Takings) 

11. Parker and Independence (Takings) 

12. High Street (new way) 

17. Water District Study Committee 

19. Conservation Fund 

20. Police Cruisers 

21. Vocational Tuition 

22. Town Hall Sprinkler System 

24. Fire Cruiser and Radio 

25. Sidewalks 

26. Police Station Furniture and Equipment 

27. M.B.T.A. 

28. Downey Property 

29. Highway Pick-up Truck 

' 30, Tag Along Road Sweeper 

31, Pick-up Sweeper 

32. Material Spreader 

34, Cemetery Building (Connmittee expense) 

35, Water Safety Program 

38, Auxiliary Fire Department 



$ 22, 


000, 


00 


3, 


000. 


00 


3. 


500. 


00 


6, 


900. 


00 




100. 


00 


8, 


602. 


30 


3. 


500. 


00 


2, 


000. 


00 


6, 


000. 


00 


3. 


250. 


00 


2, 


500. 


00 


5, 


000. 


00 


1, 


750. 


00 


6, 


200. 


00 


1, 


993. 


00 


1, 


600. 


00 


7, 


500. 


00 


2, 


500. 


00 




400. 


00 


3, 


328. 


00 




376. 


00 



Total to be raised and appropriated under Special Articles 

Transfers 



91, 999. 30 



Art. 31. 
33. 
39. 
40. 

Grand Total 
68 



From 

Machinery Fund 
Cemetery Land Fund 
Overlay Surplus 
Free Cash 



To 

Pick-up Sweeper 

Fence -Mt. Hope 

Reserve Fund 

Budget 



6, 000. 00 

2, 025. 00 

15, 000. 00 

108, 000. 00 



131. 025. 00 
$2, 418, 908. 53 



Article 9: REVALUATION 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $22,000.00 for the purpose of employ- 
ing the firm of Whipple, Magane &. Darcy, an impartial body of expert appraisers, 
to evaluate, and establish the full and fair cash value of all Real Estate in the Town 
of Acton, including residential, business, industrial, personal property, exempt 
property and land. 

This amount to include complete records of all properties in Acton, cross indexed 
summary cards and fireproof cabinets. 

VOTED: That this meeting adjourn on completion of the Article under discussion at 
11:00 P. M. until Monday, March 15, 1965 at 7:30 P. M. 

Article 10: HIGH STREET 



VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000. 00, and authorize the Select- 
men to purchase, take by eminent domain or otherwise acquire for highway purposes 
five irregularly shaped parcels of land as shown on plan entitled "Plan of the Reloca- 
tion of New Way and Portion of High Street, Acton". Said plan being on display. 

The owners, areas and locations of these parcels are as follows: 



Parcel 

1 



Owners of Record 

Charles H. Lord 
Evelyn L. Priest 
Eleanor N. Derby 
Mary Elizabeth Davis 

As above 



As above 



Mildred M. Brill & 
Roy P. Thomas 

J. Edward and 
Edna M. Sibel 



Area 
91,850 sq.ft. 

5,300 sq. ft. 

125 sq.ft. 

1,850 sq.ft. 

1,400 sq. ft. 



Location 

Foot of High Street 
sixty foot strip to 
Powder Mill Road 



Narrow strip westerly 
side High Street 

Westerly side High 
Street 

Strip Westerly side 
High Street 

Strip Easterly side 
High Street 



Article 11: STREETS 



VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,500.00, and authorize the Select- 
men to purchase, take by eminent domain or otherwise acquire for highway purposes, 
seven small parcels of land near the junction of Parker Street and Independence 
Road. Said parcels with their owners of record, areas and locations are as follows: 



Parcel Owners of Record 

1 Margaret Bogart 

2 Margaret Bogart 

3 Dorothy L. Costello 

4 Roy R. & Bette A. 

Cunningham 



Area 

40 sq.ft. 

12,650 sq.ft. 

940 sq.ft. 

800 sq.ft. 



Location 
West side Parker St. 
West side Parker St. 
West side Parker St. 
East side Parker St. 



69 



arcel 


Owners of Record 


Area 




5 


Edward H. &t Louise B. 
Howard 


400 sq. 


ft. 


6 


Edward H. & Louise B. 
Howard 


500 sq. 


ft. 


7 


C.W. Waldron 


320 sq. 


ft. 



Location 
East side Parker St. 

Apex Parker and 
Independence Road 

East side Parker St. 



All as shown on plan entitled "Plan of Relocation of a Portion of Parker Street in 
South Acton" by Engineering Department, Town of Acton to be recorded in Middle- 
sex South District Registry of Deeds, 

Article 12: CHAPTER 90 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $6,900.00 for Chapter 90 Construction 
on a new way running from High Street, approximately at the intersection of Adams 
Street, and extending in a southeasterly direction to Powder Mill Road, and on Cen- 
tral Street from Massachusetts Avenue to the Acton-Boxboro Town Line. Said money 
to be used in conjunction with $6,900.00 to be allotted by the County and $13,800.00 
to be allotted by the State. 

Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:30 P. M. on Monday, March 15, 1965. 

MOTION: To take up Article 14. 

Article 14: BORROW MONEY 

To authorize the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning January 1, 1965 and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one 
year and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 13. 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To pass over article. 

Article 15. 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To pass over article. 

Article 16. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To pass over article. 

Article 17: WATER DISTRICT STUDY 

VOTED: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint a committee of five (5) to 
study the transfer of the Acton Water District to the Town of Acton, one (1) member 
to be selected from the Board of Water Commissioners, and to report to the next 
Annual Town Meeting, and to raise and appropriate or appropriate from available 
funds the sum of $100.00. 



70 



Article 57: TOWN MANAGER 

VOTED: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to present a petition to the General 
Court of Massachusetts for an act establishing the Selectmen -Manager form of 
Government for the Town of Acton in the following form: 

AN ACT ESTABLISHING A SELECTMEN -MANAGER FORM OF GOVERNMENT 

FOR THE TOWN OF ACTON 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Scope of the Act. -- Whenever any board commission, committee or office 
is provided for or referred to in this act, the term of office of the members or incum 
bents thereof, the number of members and the powers, duties and obligations apper- 
taining thereto shall be the same as may now or hereafter be fixed by general provi- 
sions of law with respect to town boards, commissions, committees, or offices hav- 
ing corresponding powers or duties, or by the bylaws of the Town, now or hereafter 
in force, except as expressly provided herein. 

Nothing in this act shall be construed to affect in any manner any bylaw 
of the Town now in effect or which may be adopted hereafter, or the power of the 
town to amend, alter, or adopt any bylaw, or the operation or applicability to the 
town of Acton of any general or special law now or hereafter in effect, except so far 
as may be expressly provided herein. 

Section 2. Elected Officials. --At the town election following the acceptance of this 
act the registered voters of the Town of Acton shall elect the following officials: 

(a) A Moderator for a term of one year; 

(b) Two Selectmen for terms of three years each, two Selectmen for 
terms of two years each and one Selectman for a term of one year; 

(c) Two members of the school committee for terms of three years 
each, two members for terms of two years each and two members 
for a term of one year; 

(d) A Trustee of the Memorial Library for three years, one trustee for 
a term of two years and one trustee for a term of one year. 

At each annual election thereafter a moderator shall be elected for a term of one 
year and selectmen, members of the school committee and trustees of the Memorial 
Library for terms of three years each to replace those whose terms expire. When 
a vacancy occurs in the office of selectmen, the office shall be filled in accordance 
with Chapter 41, Section 10 of the General Laws. The powers, duties and responsi- 
bilities of elected officials shall be as now or hereafter provided by applicable stat- 
utes and bylaws and votes of the town, except as herein otherwise provided. 

Section 3. Appointed Officials. 

(a) The Selectmen shall appoint a town manager as provided in Section 
6, who may thereafter be removed as provided in Section 8. 

(b) The Selectmen shall appoint a planning board, a board of appeals, 
a town accountant, a personnel board, an archives committee, election officers, 
registrars of voters other than the town clerk and such other officers, boards and 
committees as they shall hereafter be directed to appoint by bylaw or vote of the 
town. The selectmen may, by majority vote, undertake an investigation of the 
affairs of any committee, board or official appointed by them or the town manager, 
and they shall have access to all records and other documents which they may deem 
necessary or desirable for this purpose. The Selectmen may remove, after such 
hearing as the Selectmen may deem advisable, any of the officers, boards and com- 



71 



mittees appointed by them under the provisions of this paragraph (b), or any mem- 
ber thereof, other than the town clerk. 

(c) The moderator shall appoint a finance comnnittee and such other 
officers, boards and committees as he shall now and hereafter be directed to appoint 
by bylaw or vote of the town. 

(d) The town naanager shall appoint, upon merit and fitness alone, and 
may remove for cause: 

(1) a town clerk, a town treasurer, a town collector and a board of 
three assessors, subject however, in each instance, to the approval of the board of 
selectmen; 

(2) all other officers, boards, committees and employees of the 
town with the exception of the elected officials specified in Section (2), officials, 
boards and committees appointed by the school committee and by the selectmen and 
moderator as hereinbefore in this Section (3) provided and employees of the samie. 

Section 4. Membership; Terms; Powers; Duties; Responsibilities; Termination -- 
The membership of boards and committees appointed as provided in Section 3, the 
length of the term of each miember thereof and of officers so appointed, and the 
powers, duties and responsibilities of the same shall be as now or hereafter pro- 
vided by applicable statutes and bylaws and votes of the town, except as herein other- 
wise provided. Upon appointment and qualification of the various officials as pro- 
vided for in Section 3, the term of office and all powers and duties of each person 
theretofore holding each such office shall cease and be terminated. 

Section 5. Multiple Officers. -- Neither the moderator nor any member of the 
Board of Selectmen, the school commiittee, or the finance committee may, during 
the term for which he was elected or appointed, be elected or appointed to any other 
town office, except as otherwise provided herein. Any person appointed by the town 
manager to any town office under the' provisions of this act or of any other statute of 
the Commonwealth shall be eligible during the term of said office to appointment to 
any other town office, except that the town accountant shall not be eligible to hold the 
position of town treasurer or of town collector. Subject to the approval of the Select- 
men, the town manager may assume the powers, duties and responsibilities of any 
officer, board or comnaittee which he is authorized to appoint, such assumption to be 
evidenced by and effective upon the filing with the town clerk of a written declaration 
of such assumption signed by the town manager and thereupon each officer, board or 
committee whose powers, duties and responsibilities are so assumed by the town 
manager shall be discharged and shall have no further powers, duties or responsibil- 
ities as such. 

Section 6. Appointment of Town Manager. -- The selectmen elected as provided 
herein shall appoint, as soon as practicable, for a term of three years, a town man- 
ager who shall be a person especially fitted, in their opinion, by education, training 
and experience to perform the duties of the office. The town manager shall be 
appointed without regard to his political beliefs. He need not be a resident of the 
town when appointed, but shall be a resident of the town during his term of office. 
No holder of elective office in the town shall within two years of holding of such 
office be eligible for appointmient as town manager. The town manager may be 
appointed for successive terms of office. Before entering upon the duties of his 
office, he shall be sworn, in the presence of a majority of the selectmien, to the 
faithful and inapartial performance thereof by the town clerk or by a justice of the 
peace or notary public. He shall execute a bond in favor of the town for the faithful 
performance of his duties in such sum and with such sureties as may be fixed or 
approved by the selectmen. 



72 



Section 7. Appointment of a Temporary Town Manager. --In the event of the tem- 
porary absence or disability of the town manager, he may appoint, subject to the 
approval of the selectmen, a suitable person to perform the duties of the manager 
during such absence or disability. If the town manager fails to make such appoint- 
ments or the person so appointed fails to serve, the selectmen may appoint a suitable 
person, who may be a selectmen, to perform such duties. In the event of any vacancy 
in the office of town manager or the suspension of the town manager as hereinafter 
provided, the selectmen shall, within seven days, appoint the person to perform such 
duties. 

Section 8. Removal of Manager. -- The selectmen may remove the town manager by 
the affirmative vote of at least three members of the board. At least thirty days 
before such proposed removal shall become effective, the selectmen shall file a pre- 
liminary written resolution with the town clerk setting forth the specific reasons for 
his proposed removal. The town clerk shall forthwith deliver a copy of such resolu- 
tion to the town manager or mail the same to him by registered mail at his last known 
address. The manager may file with the selectmen, within seven days after receipt 
of such copy, a written request for a public hearing as to the reasons for his removal. 
If the manager so request, the board of selectmen shall hold a public hearing not ear- 
lier than ten days nor later than twenty days after the filing of such request. After 
such public hearing, if any, otherwise at the expiration of thirty days following the 
filing of the preliminary resolution, and after full consideration, the selectmen, by 
the affirmative vote of at least three members of the board may adopt a final resolu- 
tion of removal. In the preliminary resolution, the selectmen may suspend the man- 
ager from duty, but shall in any case cause to be paid to him forthwith any unpaid 
balance of his salary for the then current month and, at the discretion of the select- 
men, such additional amount not in excess of three months' salary, as the selectmen 
shall deem proper. 

Section 9. Compensation of Manager. -- As determined by the provisions of the 
Personnel Bylaw for Wages and Salary Determination and Administration of the 
Town of Acton, Massachusetts, as the same may be amended from time to time for 
so long as the same may remain in force. 

Section 10. Powers and Duties of Manager. --In addition to specific powers and 
duties provided elsewhere in this act the town manager shall have the general powers 
and duties enumerated in this section: 

(a) The town manager shall supervise and direct and shall be responsible 
for the efficient administration of all officers, boards and committees appointed by 
him and their respective departments. 

(b) He may, with the approval of at least three of the selectmen, estab- 
lish, combine, reorganize, or discontinue departments under his supervision, and 
with the approval of both the selectmen and the finance committee, he may transfer 
all or part of the appropriation of a discontinued department to any other department, 
any balance not so transferred to be returned to the town treasury. 

(c) With respect to the wages or salary and classification of employees 
appointed by the town manager, he shall be governed by the provisions of the Person- 
nel Bylaw for Wages and Salary Determination and Administration of the Town of 
Acton, Massachusetts, as the same may be amended from time to time and for so 
long as the same may remain in force. 

(d) The town manager shall keep full and complete records of his office, 
and shall render as often as may be required by the selectmen a full report of all 
operations during the period reported on. 



73 



(e) With the exception of property under the jurisdiction of the school 
connmittee, the town manager shall have full and exclusive jurisdiction over the 
rental and use of all Town property, and shall be responsible for the proper main- 
tenance and repair thereof; and, upon request by the school committee, he shall be 
responsible for the maintenance and repair of property under its jurisdiction, but 
only to such extent and for such period as the school committee shall have from 
time to time specify. He shall be responsible for the preparation of plans and the 
supervision of work on existing and on new buildings and grounds, unless a Special 
Committee of the Town is created for such purpose. 

(f) The town manager shall purchase all supplies and materials and 
equipment and award all contracts for all departments of the town, but he shall make 
purchases for departmients not under his supervision only upon requisition duly author 
ized by the head of such department. 

(g) The town manager shall administer either directly or through a per- 
son or persons appointed by him in accordance with this act all provisions of general 
and special laws applicable to the town and bylaws and votes of the town, within the 
scope of his duties, and all rules and regulations nnade by the selectmen. 

(h) The town manager, subject to the approval of the board of selectmen, 
shall have authority to prosecute, defend and connpromise all litigation to which the 
town is a party, and to employ counsel whenever in his judgment it may be necessary. 

(i) The town manager shall perform such other duties, consistent with 
his office, as may be required by bylaw or vote of the town or by vote of the selectme 

Section 11. Investigation by Manager. -- The town manager may without notice cause 
the affairs of any committee, board or official under his control or the conduct of any 
officer or employee thereof to be examined. The town manager shall have access to 
all town books and papers for information necessary for the performance of his duties 

Section 12. Relative to Duties of Boards and Officers Appointed by Town Manager. -- 
Except as otherwise herein provided, each committee, board and officer appointed 
by the town manager shall, in the performance of their duties be subject to the gener- 
al supervision and direction of the town manager. Such committees and boards shall 
promptly organize for the proper conduct of their respective offices. Each committer 
and board member and each officer appointed by the town manager shall hold office 
until his successor has been appointed and qualifies, unless his office shall have be- 
come vacant by reason of his resignation or removal. 

Section 13. Vacancies to be Filled by Town Manager. -- Any vacancy in an office or 
committee or board over which the town manager has power of appointment shall be 
filled by the town manager, as hereinbefore provided. 

Section 14. Oath of Office of Town Officials. -- All elected officials shall be sworn 
to the faithful performiance of their respective duties by the town clerk or a justice 
of the peace or notary public, except that the town clerk shall be sworn to the faithful 
performance of his duties by the chairman of the board of selectmen or by a justice 
of the peace or notary public. 

Section 15. Warrants. -- A copy of each warrant for the payment of town funds pre- 
pared by the town accountant shall be submitted promiptly to the town manager who 
shall make recommendation to the selectmen with respect to the approval or disap- 
proval by them of each such warrant or of any item or items in any such warrant. 

Section 16. Receipts Paid to Treasury. -- Every official shall pay into the treasury 
of the town all amounts received by him on behalf of the town and all fees received by 
him in accordance with the provisions of any general or special law and shall make a 
full and true return thereof to the town accountant. 

74 



Section 17. Estimates of Expenditures -- On or before the first day of December of 
each year, the town manager shall submit to the selectmen a careful, detailed esti- 
mate in writing of the probable expenditures of the town government for the ensuing 
fiscal year, stating the amount required to meet the interest and maturing bonds and 
notes or other outstanding indebtedness of the town, and showing specifically the 
amount necessary to be provided for each fund and department, together with a state- 
ment of the expenditures of the town for the same purposes in the two preceding years 
and an estimate of the expenditures for the current year. He shall also submit a 
statement showing all revenues received by the town in the two preceding fiscal years 
together with an estimate of the receipts of the current year and an estimate of the 
amount of income from all sources of revenue exclusive of taxes upon property in the 
ensuing year. He shall report the probable amount required to be levied and raised 
by taxation to defray all expenses and liabilities of the town together with an estimate 
of the tax rate necessary to raise said amount. For the purpose of enabling the town 
manager to make up the annual estimates of expenditures, all boards, officers, and 
committees of the town shall, upon his written request, furnish all information in 
their possession and submit to him in writing a detailed estimate of the appropria- 
tions required for the efficient and proper conduct of their respective departments 
during the next fiscal year. 

Section 18. Annual Budget -- The selectmen shall consider the tentative budget sub- 
mitted by the town manager and make such recommendations relative thereto as they 
may deem expedient and proper in the interests of the town. On or before the twen- 
tieth day of December of each year the selectmen shall transmit a copy of the budget 
together with their recommendations relative thereto to each member of the finance 
committee. 

Section 19. Duties of Certain Town Officials Relative to Election --It shall be the 
duty of the selectmen and the town clerk in office and any other town official upon 
whom by reason of his office a duty devolves under the provisions of this act, when 
this act is accepted by the registered voters as herein provided, to comply with all 
the requirements of law relating to elections, to the end that all things may be done 
necessary for the nomination and election of the officers first to be elected under 
this act. 

Section 20. Submission of Act and Time of Taking Effect -- This act shall be sub- 
mitted to the qualified voters of the Town of Acton for acceptance at the first annual 
town election occurring not less than thirty days after the passage of this act. The 
vote shall be taken by ballot in answer to the question which shall be printed on the 
official ballot: "Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year nineteen hundred 
and sixty-five entitled 'AN ACT ESTABLISHING A SELECTMEN -MANAGER FORM 
OF GOVERNMENT FOR THE TOWN OF ACTON' be accepted? " If this act shall be 
so accepted by a majority of the qualified voters voting thereon it shall become and 
be in full force and effect immediately after the final adjournment of the annual town 
meeting held in the year following the year in which this act is so accepted, provided, 
however, that said annual town meeting shall be held in conformance with the provi- 
sions of this act. If this act is rejected by the qualified voters of the Town of Acton 
when first submitted to said voters under this section, it shall be submitted for 
acceptance in like manner to such voters at the next following annual town election in 
said town, and if it is not accepted at said annual election, it shall again be submitted 
for acceptance in like manner to such voters at the next following annual town election, 
and, if accepted by a majority of such voters voting thereon at either of said elections, 
shall take effect as hereinbefore provided. 



75 



Section 21. Bylaws, Rules, etc. -- All laws, bylaws, votes, rules and regulations 
in force in the town of Acton when this act takes effect, not inconsistent with its pro- 
visions, whether enacted by authority of the town or any other authority, shall con- 
tinue in full force and effect until otherwise provided by law, bylaw or vote; all 
other laws, bylaws, votes, rules and regulations, so far as they refer to the town of 
Acton, are hereby repealed and annulled, but such repeal shall not revive any pre- 
existing enactment. 

Section 2 2. Revocation of Acceptance --At any time after the expiration of three 
years from the date on which this act is accepted, and not less than sixty days before 
the date of an annual meeting, a petition, signed by not less than twenty percent of 
the registered voters of the town, miay be filed with the selectmen, requesting that 
the question of revoking the acceptance of this act be submitted to the voters at the 
next annual town meeting. At said election the question shall be printed on the offi- 
cial ballot: "Shall the acceptance by the town of Acton of an act passed by the Gen- 
eral Court in the year nineteen hundred and sixty-five entitled 'AN ACT ESTABLISH- 
ING A SELECTMEN -MANAGER FORM OF GOVERNMENT FOR THE TOWN OF 
ACTON' be revoked?" If such revocation is favored by a majority of the qualified 
voters voting thereon, the acceptance of this act shall be revoked and this act shall 
become null and void beginning with the annual town meeting next following such vote, 
provided that all town officers holding office under this act shall continue to hold 
office until their successors have been duly qualified. At the first annual town elec- 
tion following such vote of revocation the registered voters of the town shall elect by 
ballot all elective officers, boards, and committees whose election to office was 
required immediately prior to the acceptance of this act, provided, however, that 
the town does not vote to accept other plans which provide for a different arrange- 
ment from that existing immediately prior to the acceptance of this act. It shall be 
the duty of the selectmen and the town clerk in office and any other town official upon 
whom by reason of this office a duty devolves when this act is revoked, to comply 
with all of the requirements of this section relating to elections, to the end that all 
things may be done necessary for the nomination and election of the officers required 
to be elected following the revocation of this act. The said revocation shall not affect 
any contract then existing or any action at law or any suit in equity or any other pro- 
ceedings then pending, with the exception of any contract made by the town with the 
town manager then in office, whose contract shall be terminated immediately upon 
such vote, but who shall receive three months' compensation from the date following 
such vote. The board of selectmen shall be charged with all the powers and duties of 
the town manager which duties and responsibilities may be discharged by themselves 
or by a temporary town manager appointed by them. Any special laws relative to 
said town which are repealed by this act shall be revived by such revocation. All 
laws, bylaws, votes, rules and regulations repealed and annulled, as provided in 
Section 21 shall be revived by such revocation. Bylaws, votes and rules and regula- 
tions in force when said revocation takes effect, so far as consistent with the general 
laws respecting town government and town officers and with special laws, shall not 
be effected thereby. 

Moderator appointed the following tellers: Beverlie B. Tuttle, David L. May, 
Raymond F. Letts, Harold W. Flood, K. "Gordon Platine, Robert E. Sweeney, 
James L. Parker and Warren L. Newell. 

Ballot Vote. Total - 676. Yes - 361, No - 315. 



76 



Article 27: M.B.T.A. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,750.00, to allow 
the Selectmen to enter into a suitable contract with the Massachusetts Bay Transpor- 
tation Authority for railroad commuter service for the Town of Acton. 

Article 18: PACY LAND 

VOTED: To approve the purchase of 12| acres, more or less, located in the wester- 
ly portion of Town, bounded on the south by land belonging to the Commonwealth and 
Route 2, on the west by land belonging to Mr. Crimens Pacy and Bullette Road, on 
the north by the Town Forest and land belonging to Annie B. Lehto, and on the east 
by land belonging to the Town of Acton, by the Conservation Commission, as estab- 
lished under G. L., Chap. 40, Sect. 8C for the Town of Acton utilizing funds from the 
Conservation Fund established under Sect, 5, Clause 51, and further to approve the 
application of the Conservation Commission for reimbursement from the Common- 
wealth under Chapter 132A, Sect. 11. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: That this meeting adjourn on completion of the Article 
under discussion at 11:00 P. M. until Monday, March 22, 1965 at 7:30 P. M. 

Article 19: CONSERVATION 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $8,602.30, for the Conservation Fund. 

Article 20: POLICE CRUISERS 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,500.00, for the purchase of two (2) 
police cruisers and authorize the Board of Selectmen to trade in, sell, or otherwise 
dispose of the present cruisers. 

Article 21: VOCATIONAL TUITION 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00, for the payment of vocation- 
al tuition and transportation according to the provisions of Chapter 74 of the General 
Laws. 

Article 22: SPRINKLER SYSTEM 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $6,000.00, for the construction and 
installation of a complete sprinkler system for the Town Hall. 

Article 23. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To pass over article. 

Article 24: FIRE CHIEF CRUISER 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,250.00, to purchase a new cruiser 
and radio for the Fire Chief and authorize the Board of Selectmen to trade in, sell, 
or otherwise dispose of the present cruiser. 

Article 25: SIDEWALKS 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500.00, for the construction of new 
sidewalks. This construction would be the first phase of a program which would aim 

77 



at the completion of the town trunk sidewalk system, (principally along Route 27 
and Route 111) as described in the report of the Sidewalk Study Committee. The 
total program would entail approximately one mile of additions. 

Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:30 P. M. on Monday, March 22, 1965. 

Article 26: POLICE STATION 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000.00, to be ex- 
pended by the Town Building Committee for the purpose of purchasing furniture and 
equipment for the new police station located on Main Street, Acton. 

Article 28: DOWNEY PROPERTY 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $6,200.00, and authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or otherwise acquire a certain parcel 
of land, having an area of approximately 12,400 square feet with a frontage of 173 
feet on Woodbury Lane, formerly owned by Mary A. Downey. Said land to be acquired 
for the purpose of enlarging existing land area adjacent to the Town Hall and Library. 

Moderator appointed the following tellers: John L. Maes, Theodore Bluestein, 
K. Gordon Platine, Joseph J. Coughlan, James L. Parker, Beverlie B. Tuttle, 
Harold Y. Banquer and Harold W. Flood. 

Total Vote. 301 Yes - 263, No - 38. 

Article 29: HIGHWAY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,993.00, for the 
purchase of a new half -ton (|- ton) pick-up truck for the Highway Department and 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to trade in the present half -ton (| ton) pick-up 
truck. 

Article 30: HIGHWAY 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,600.00 for the purchase of a new 
Tag Along Road Sweeper for the Highway Department. 

Article 31: HIGHWAY 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $7,500.00, and appropriate $6,000.00 
from the Machinery Fund for the purchase of a new 4-4-|- Yard Pick-Up Sweeper 
for the Highway Department. 

Article 32: HIGHWAY 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500.00, for the purchase of a new 
6 yard Hydraulic Material Spreader for the Highway Department. 

Article 33: CEMETERY 

VOTED: To appropriate from the Cemetery Land Fund the sum of $2,025.00, to be 
expended under the direction of the Cemetery Commissioners, for the purpose of 
removing the existing hedge on the South Acton side of Mount Hope Cemetery and 
replacing said hedge with a chain link fence. 

78 



Article 34: CEMETERY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Town Engineer, with the advice of the 
Town Building Committee and the Cemetery Department, to complete the plans and 
specifications for the constructing, equipping and furnishing of a combination garage 
and office building for the Cemetery Department to be erected on land owned by the 
Town on Concord Road and authorize the Town Building Committee to advertise and 
open bids for the above building and raise and appropriate $400.00 for the use of the 
Building Committee. 

Article 35: WATER SAFETY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,328.00 for the sup- 
port of the Water Safety Program which is jointly sponsored by the School Department, 
the Walden District Water Safety Council, and the Acton Recreation Commission. 

Article 36: RECREATION 

MOTION: To raise and appropriate the sum of $500.00 for the Acton Recreation 
Commission to conduct investigations, tests and planning activities related to estab- 
lishing a swimming facility. 

Total Vote - 364. Yes - 178, No - 186. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 37: CLEAN UP 

MOTION: To raise and appropriate the sum of $200.00 for the Acton Board of Health 
to use in its Spring Clean Up Campaign. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 38: AUXILIARY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3 76.00 to be used in 
conjunction with the amount of $43 5.00 unanimously voted under Article 64 at the 
Annual Town Meeting, March 12, 1962, to purchase raincoats and boots for the 
auxiliary fire department. 

Article 39: RESERVE FUND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from Overlay Surplus the sum of $15,000.00 
for a Reserve Fund, pursuant to the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 6. 

Article 40: FREE CASH 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate and transfer the sum of $108,000.00 from 
Free Cash to be used by the Assessors in considering and fixing the tax rate for the 
current year. 

Article 41: EXCAVATIONS 

VOTED: To amend the Town Bylaws by adding thereto, in accordance with Section 
21 (19) of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, the following: 



79 



Excavations. The owners of any land which has been excavated in any way, shall, 
within five (5) days following receipt of written notice from the Selectmen that the 
Selectmen have determined that said excavation constitutes a hazard to public safety, 
erect barriers or take other suitable measures to protect persons from harm there- 
from. Failure to comply herewith shall be subject to prosecution under the provi- 
sions of Section 21 (19) of Chapter 40 of the General Laws and the penalty for viola- 
tion hereof shall not be less than $100.00 nor moi-e than $200.00. 

Article 42: JUNK CARS 

VOTED: To amend the bylaws of the Town of Acton by adding thereto the following: 
Unregistered motor vehicles which are unfit for use, permanently dis- 
abled or otherwise inoperative due to dismantling or other causes shall 
not be stored, parked, or placed upon land in the Town unless the same 
shall be within a building or in an area unexposed to the view of the pub- 
lic or abutting residents or shall be in an area properly approved for 
the keeping of same by licensed junk dealers or automobile dealers. 

Owners of the land on which such storing, parking, or placing of unregis- 
tered motor vehicles occurs, within the meaning of this bylaw shall, 
within five (5) days following receipt of a notice from the Selectmen, 
remove or enclose such vehicle. 

The penalty for violation of this bylaw shall be not less than $10.00 nor 
more than $20.00 for each offense. Each day that such violation con- 
tinues shall constitute a separate offense. 

Article 43: BUILDING INSPECTOR 

VOTED: To amend the Building Bylaw by deleting Section 2A and substituting in 

place thereof the following: 

Section 2 A. The Inspector's compensation shall be in accordance with 
the Personnel Board's Schedule and as determined by the Selectmen. 

Article 44: BUILDING 

MOTION: To amend the Building Bylaw by adding to Section 3 the following: 
After the foundation of the building for which a permit has been issued 
has been constructed, and before any further work shall be done on 
said building, a plot plan prepared and certified by a registered engi- 
neer or surveyor containing a statement that all sideline and setback 
distances and measurements thereon are correct, showing the size of 
the building, the shortest distance from each lot line to the nearest 
point of the building to that lot line, the shortest distance from any 
adjacent street line, and the width of the street at the point where the 
set back distance is given, shall be filed with the Building Inspector. 

C. A building permit shall be required for the replacement of more 
than 10% of any roofing material. 

D. A building permit shall be required for the demolishing of any 
building. 

VOTED: To strike out first paragraph and insert the following: 

After the foundation, for which a permit has been issued, has been 
constructed, and before any further work shall be done dn said build- 
ing, a plot plan prepared and certified by a registered engineer or 

80 



surveyor containing a statement that all sideline and setback distances 
and measurements are legal and in accordance with the minimum dis- 
tances for sideline and setbacks and width of lot at the setback. line, 
provided for in the zoning requirements for that area, shall be filed 
with the Building Inspector. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend paragraph D by adding: "over 1,000 cubic feet." 

VOTED UNANIMOU,SLY: To delete paragraph C. 

VOTE ON AMENDED MOTION: LOST. 

Article 55: ZONING 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by adding thereto 
a Shopping Center Bylaw, as follows: 

(Add to Section III A -2) 

b. Shopping Centers (Min. 40,000 sq.ft.) B-2 

1. A shopping center for the purposes of this Bylaw is defined as 
any building or buildings used or to be used for two or more 
retail business establishments on one lot or on two or more 
adjacent lots held in single or separate ownership and used 
together or employing the same access and parking facilities 
for the common benefit of said adjacent lots. 

(Add to Section III B) 

2. Shopping Centers shall be located in B-1 Districts only. 

All plans for buildings to be erected, parking areas, entrance 
and exit driveways, signs and lighting facilities shall be sub- 
mitted to the Planning Board for prior approval before appli- 
cation for any permits shall be made. 

(Add to Section IV C) 
C. 3. The following uses are permitted in Shopping Centers. 

a. Bank or Office. 

b. Indoor place of amusement or assembly. 

c. Retail business, or service not involving manufacturing 
on the premises except retail bakeries in which not more 
than five persons are engaged in the manufacture and sale 
on the premises of the goods produced. 

d. Restaurants or other eating places serving food only to 
persons seated at tables or counters, provided no mechan- 
ical or live entertainment is regularly furnished. 

(Add to Section V-A-5) 

In each Shopping Center (B-2) there shall be at least 300 
square feet of parking area exclusive of any areas required 
for the circulation of, or loading of vehicles for each 100 
square feet of building, including basement areas, used 
for merchandising in any way, and all other floors. Where 
such parking area abuts a street, there shall be a strip not 
less than six (6) feet in width within the lot, measured at 
and parallel with the side line of the street, except at drive- 



ways required for access, which strip shall be landscaped 
and maintained. Where such parking area abuts property 
being used for residential purposes or in a residential dis- 
trict there shall be a fence erected at or near the dividing 
property lines together with a strip not less than six (6) 
feet in width measured along and parallel to said property 
lines, which strip shall be landscaped and maintained to 
provide suitable screening between the properties. All 
signs on the premises shall meet with the approval of the 
Planning Board and be licensed by the Board of Selectmen 
under Section II (D). 

Lighting facilities, both in parking areas and on the exterior 
of the building or buildings, shall be so arranged that they 
neither unreasonably distract occupants or adjacent proper- 
ties nor interfere with traffic on the streets. 

(Add to Section V B) 



B-2 



All Uses 












\llowed in 










Hgt. Above 


Shopping 


Lot Area 


Frontage 


Front 


Side 


Mean Ground 


Centers 


(Sq. Ft.) 


etc. 


Yard 


Yard 


Level 




40,000 


200 


30 


30 (36 if 
adjacent to 
residential 
district or 
property 
used for 
residential 
purposes. 


30 feet to 
highest point 
of building. 



Article 51: ZONING 



MOTION: To amend the protective zoning bylaw of the Town of Acton and the 
'Zoning Map of the Town of Acton' by changing from Residential (R-2) to Business 
(B-1) the following described area of land in that part of Acton, called South Acton, 
located on the Westerly side of Main Street, bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the Westerly side of Main Street at the 
Maynard -Acton Town Line, thence running 

NORTHWESTERLY along the Westerly side line of said Main Street, 

two thousand one hundred sixty (2,160) feet, 
more or less, to the Southerly side line of Pine 
Street, thence 

WESTERLY turning and running along the Southerly side line 

of Pine Street, and the projection thereof, five 
hundred sixty-one (561) feet, more or less, 

SOUTHEASTERLY to land of the Boston and Maine Railroad, two 

thousand two hundred forty-four (2,244) feet, 
more or less, to the point of beginning. 

Containing 13.3 acres, more or less. 

Total Vote. 332 Yes - 154 No - 178 222 - Needed to carry. 

MOTION LOST. 



82 



Article 52. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To pass over the article. 

11:15P.M. Voted to adjourn until 7:30 P. M. March 29, 1965 

Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:30 P. M. Monday, March 29, 1965. 

Article 45: BUILDING PERMITS 

MOTION: To determine if the Town will vote to amend the Building Bylaw by 
deleting the first paragraph of Section 4 thereof and substituting in place thereof 
the following: 

The Inspector of Buildings shall report to applicant on all applications 
for building permits within five (5) working days either following 
receipt of a notice in writing by him that the Board of Health has approved 
the land to be built upon for percolation or where no percolation test 
shall be required following receipt by him of such application. The Board 
of Selectmen can, in special cases, extend the above time as seems to 
it in the best interests of the public. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 46: BUILDING PERMIT FEES 

VOTED: To amend the Building Bylaw by deleting the second paragraph of Section 5 
and substituting therefor the following: 

Residential, Commercial, Municipal or Charitable Buildings 

$2. 50 per $0. to $1, 000. 00 estimated construction 

cost plus $1. 50 per thousand or fraction thereof 

exceeding the first $1, 000. 00 of estimated cost. 

Article 47: FOUNDATIONS 

VOTED: To amend the Building Bylaw by adding to Section 9 A. the following: 
The top of all foundations shall be at least eight (8) inches above finished 
grade. 

Article 48: CHIMNEYS 

MOTION: To determine if the Town will vote to amend the Building Bylaw by adding 

to Section lOA, 1. the following: 

All chimneys shall have at least an 18 gauge galvanized thimble installed in 
them to receive smoke pipes, set flush with the inside of brick or masonry 
face. 

VOTED: To amend motion to read: All chimneys receiving smoke pipes shall have 
at least an 18 gauge galvanized steel thimble installed in them, set flush with the 
inside of brick or masonry face. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 49: RANGE HOODS 

MOTION: To determine if the Town will vote to amend the Building Bylaw by adding 
to Section 10 A. 8. the following: 



83 



f. Ducts from Range hoods shall be of metal of not less than 18 gauge 

galvanized steel or 20 gauge stainless steel, having a melting point 
of not less than 1100°F. , and shall lead directly to the outside of the 
building. Long runs of ducts shall be avoided. 

VOTED: To amend motion by deleting the following: 

"having a melting point of not less than 1100°F. " 

VOTED: To amend motion by deleting word " directly" . 

VOTED: To amend motion by deleting: " Long runs of ducts shall be avoided. " 

Moderator appointed the following tellers: Elizabeth H. Boardman, John F. 
McLaughlin, Jane A. Rogers and Joseph J. Coughlan. 

Total Vote - 222 Yes - 89 No - 133 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 50: BUILDING BYLAW 

VOTED: To amend the Building Bylaw by deleting Section 17. 

Article 53: ZONING 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: That the Protective Zoning Bylaw be amended by deleting 
from Section V (B) the words " Frontage or width at Minimum Setback" and substi- 
tuting therefor the words " Frontage''' 

''' Exceptions: 1) If a lot fronts entirely on a 62. 5 foot or greater sideline 

radius cul-de-sac, the minimum frontage will be 100 feet. 

2) If a lot fronts entirely on the outside of a curved road 

sideline of 300 foot radius or less, the minimum frontage 
will be 125 feet for R-2 and 150 feet for R-1. " 

Article 54: ZONING 

VOTED: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by deleting Sub -Section 2 of 

Section V (A) and substituting in place thereof the following: 

2) No building or other structure shall be erected nearer than 30 feet 

to the sidelines of any street. Any building or structures on a 
corner lot adjacent to two or more streets shall have the full 
frontage required by Section V (B) on at least one such street. 

Total Vote - 223 Yes - 206. No - 17. Needed to Carry - 149. 

Article 56. 
VOTED: To pass over article. 

Article 58: HOME RULE 

MOTION: As printed in warrant. 

VOTED: To amend motion by striking out in paragraph beginning "NOW THERE- 
FORE BE IT RESOLVED" "H1384 of 1963 as revised" and insert House Bill No. 
461 pending before the current session of the General Court. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To adopt the following resolution: 
84 



WHEREAS the General Court sitting as a Constitutional Convention, did 

on July 16, 1963, give initial approval to a Home Rule amend- 
ment to the state Constitution, and 

WHEREAS this bill of rights for local governments requires a second 

approval by the members of the General Court during this 
legislative session, and 

WHEREAS we, as members of this Town Meeting, feel competent to handle 

the affairs of our town without strict supervision by the 
Commonwealth of our every act and deed. 

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that this town meeting hereby instructs 
its representatives to the General Court to vote in favor of 
the Home Rule proposal (House Bill No. 461 pending before 
the current session of the General Court, ) summarized below, 
when it comes before them. 

PROPOSED HOME RULE AMENDMENT 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would annul Article H of the Amendments to the Constitu- 
tion, as amended, which authorizes the Legislature to establish cities in certain 
towns and to provide for ward, or other meetings, for the election of constitutional 
officers and to establish representative town meeting forms of government in 
certain other towns, and substitute therefor a new Article H. 

The proposed new Article H consists of nine sections. Section 1 states an intent to 
grant and confirm the right of local self-government in local matters subject to the 
Article and laws thereunder. 

Section 2 provides that any city or town shall have the power to adopt or revise a 
charter, or to amend its existing charter, through procedures specified in the 
Article, city government being restricted to towns of twelve thousand or more and 
representative town meeting government to towns of six thousand or more. 

Section 3 provides for adoption or revision of a charter on petition by fifteen per- 
cent of the voters; the submission to the voters of the question and for the nomina- 
tion and election, of a charter commission; in the event of an affirmative vote the 
nine candidates who individually receive the greater number of votes to be declared 
elected. The charter or revised charter is to be submitted within ten months to the 
city council or selectmen, who shall provide for publication and for submitting it 
to a vote at least two months thereafter, the charter or revised charter to be effec- 
tive if it is approved by a majority of the voters voting thereon. 

Under Section 4 amendments to a charter may be proposed by a two -thirds affirma- 
tive vote of the members of the legislative body of a city or town voting thereon, 
except that in cities having mayors the mayor must concur, and changes relating to 
composition, elections, or term of the legislative body, mayor, city manager, 
selectmen or town manager shall be made only by the procedure for charter adoption. 
All charter amendments are to be published and submitted for approval as provided 
for adoption or revision of a charter. 

Section 5 provides for duplicate certificates setting forth any charter adopted, 
revised or amended, by the city or town clerk, one to be deposited in the office of 
the Secretary of the Commonwealth, the other in the records of the city or town, 
and that all courts may take judicial notice thereof. 



85 



Under Section 6 any city or town by ordinance or bylaw may exercise any authority 
the legislature has power to confer on it, which is not inconsistent with the Consti- 
tution or laws enacted by the General Court in conformity with the powers reserved 
to it in section 8, and which is not denied to the city or town by its charter. It is 
provided that the section shall apply to every city or town that has adopted a charter. 

Under Section 7, nothing in the Article is to be deemed to grant a city or town power 
to (1) regulate elections; (2) levy, assess or collect taxes; (3) borrow money or 
pledge its credit; (4) dispose of park land; (5) enact private or civil law governing 
civil relationships except as an exercise of an independent municipal power or; (6) 
define and provide for the punishment of a felony or to impose imprisonment except 
as may be authorized by the General Court in conformity to the powers reserved to 
it by Section 8 of the Article, nor shall the provisions of the Article be deemed to 
diminish the judicial powers of the Commonwealth. 

Under Section 8 the General Court shall have power to act in relation to cities and 
towns only by general laws applying alike to all, or to a class of not fewer than two 
except for special laws enacted, (1) on prior petition approved by the voters, the 
local legislative body, or the town meeting, relating to the city or town; (2) by a 
two-thirds affirmative vote of each branch of the General Court following a recom- 
mendation by the Governor; (3) establishing metropolitan or regional entities 
embracing two or more cities or towns or parts thereof for a public purpose and 
granting powers thereto; or (4) limited to incorporation or dissolution of cities or 
towns as entities, alteration of boundaries, or merger or consolidation of cities 
or towns. Subject thereto the General Court may provide optional plans of munici- 
pal government and. the adoption thereof by vote, subject to the restrictions as to 
population already set out. The section is to apply to every city or town whether or 
not it has adopted a charter. 

Under Section 9 all special laws relating to individual cities and towns are to remain 
in effect and have the force of an existing charter, but are to be subject to change 
in accordance with the provision of Sections 3 and 4. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 9:20 P. M. 

A true copy. Attest: 

CHARLES M. MacRAE 
Town Clerk 



86 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, JUNE 7, 1965 



Article 1: ARLINGTON STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To direct the Board of Selectmen to petition the County 
Commissioners for the discontinuance of the easement on land taken by eminent 
domain for the purpose of relocating Arlington Street, in the Town of Acton, said 
taking being recorded in the Middlesex South Registry of Deeds in Book 10367, Page 
181, under date of September 26, 1963 and also recorded in said Registry of Deeds, 
Land Registration office, as document number 397489; and the entry upon said land 
being dated October 21, 1963 and recorded in said Registry of Deeds Book 10448, 
Page 196, under date of January 21, 1964. 

Article 2: ASSESSMENT 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To petition the State Tax Commission for the installation 
of the State Assessment System as provided in Section 7A of Chapter 58 of the Gen- 
eral Laws. 

Article 3: ZONING 

MOTION: To rezone from Residential to Light Industrial land situated at the inter- 
section of Maple and Stow Streets as follows: from the intersection of Maple and 
Stow Streets a distance of 300 feet westerly along Maple Street, thence a distance 
of approximately 670 feet southerly to Fort Pond Brook parallel to Stow Street, 
thence a distance of 355 feet easterly along Fort Pond Brook, thence a distance 
approximately 82 6 feet northerly along Stow Street to the point of beginning. 

The Moderator appointed the following tellers: W. Lawrence Marshall, Jr., 
Raymond F. Letts, James L. Parker, John F. McLaughlin, Ormal S. Laffin, 
John McKey Whittier. 

Ballot Vote. Total - 203. Yes - 97 No - 106 
Motion lost. 

Article 4: CEMETERY 

VOTED: To appropriate from the Cemetery Land Fund the sum of $150.00, or any 
other sum, to be used in conjunction with $2,025.00 voted under Article 33 of the 
Annual Town Meeting, March 1965, for the purpose of removing the existing hedge 
on the South Acton side of Mount Hope Cemetery and replacing said hedge with a 
chain link fence. 

Article 5: TRANSFER FUNDS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To transfer the sum of $1,379.42 from the Insurance 
Claims Recovery account to the Fire Department expense account. 

Article 6: TRANSFER FUNDS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To transfer from the Insurance Claims Recovery account 
to the General Highway Maintenance account, the sum of $110.00. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 9:07 P. M. 

A true copy. Attest: CHARLES M. MacRAE, Town Clerk 

87 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING HELD NOVEMBER 15, 1965 



Article 1: BYLAWS 

VOTED: To amend Section 1 of the Bylaws of the Town of Acton by adding a new 
Article 7. 

Article 7. Town Meeting Reconsideration. 

a. Any voter shall be pernnitted to move reconsideration 
of a vote taken at a Town Meeting, subject to the limi- 
tation or exceptions set forth in succeeding sections 

of this bylaw. 

b. A motion to reconsider any vote taken at the meeting 
shall require a 2/3 vote if made at the same session at 
which the vote to be reconsidered is taken. If made at 
any adjourned session of the meeting, 3/4 vote shall be 
required and notice of this intention to move such re- 
consideration shall be given in writing to the Town 
Clerk at least eight (8) hours before the opening of such 
adjourned session and formal notification bearing the 
Seal of the Town shall be posted by the constable at the 
locations designated by the Selectmen for posting the 
warrant at least six (6) hours before the opening of such 
adjourned session. 

c. This bylaw does not limit the number of times that re- 
consideration of a vote may be moved except that at a 
single session such reconsideration may be moved only 
once. 

d. A motion to reconsider a vote is debatable if a motion 
originating the vote was debatable. 

Article 2: DUMP BODY 

VOTED: To appropriate from Surplus Revenue the sum of $2,200.00 for the purchas 
of a new dump body for the Highway Department. 

Article 3: TRANSFER 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To transfer the sum of $300.00 from the State Census 
Account, Budget Item 20, to Elections and Registrations, Salaries and Wages, Bud- 
get Item 21, both of Article 8 of the 1965 Annual Town Meeting. 

Article 4: LAND LEASE 

MOTION: To appropriate from Surplus Revenue the sum of $12,000.00, to allow the 
Board of Selectmen to enter into a suitable lease of certain land with the building 
thereon, now owned by Haartz Auto Fabric Co., situated on the northerly side of 
Hayward Road and on the westerly side of Route 2, to be used as a garage for Town 
Owned Equipment and to provide office space for several Town Departments. 

MOTION LOST. 

VOTED: To take up Article 23. 



88 



Article 23: DOG LAW 

MOTION: To adopt the following Dog Control Bylaw: No person owning, harboring, 
or having custody and control of a dog within the Town of Acton shall allow such dog 
to be at large within said Town, other than upon the premises of the owner or upon 
the premises of another person with the knowledge and assent of such other person; 
nor shall the first mentioned person suffer, permit, or allow such dog to urinate, 
defecate, or commit any other nuisance upon the property of any person, or of the 
Town, other than upon his own property or upon the property of another person with 
the knowledge and assent of such other person. 

Whoever violates any provision of this article shall be liable to a fine for each offense 
of not less than the maximum amount permitted by applicable Chapters and Sections 
of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

Any dog found at large within the Town of Acton may be impounded by the Town Dog 
Officer, the Police of the Town, or other Town Employee authorized by the Town 
Selectmen. If any resident of Acton makes a complaint that a particular dog is at 
large within the Town and said complaint is verified by the Town Dog Officer, the 
Police of the Town, or other authorized Town employee, such dog shall be impounded. 

Any dog impounded under this article shall be retained for a period of three (3) days 
at a licensed kennel, during which period the owner of the impounded dog may iden- 
tify and establish claim for such dog. Should no owner properly identify or estab- 
lish claim for such dog within the three (3) day period, all rights, title,, interest, 
and privileges of any person with respect to such dog shall be considered forfeited 
and such dog may be sold or destroyed. In either event, the owner of said dog at 
the time of violation of this article, if determinable, shall be liable for the afore- 
mentioned fine and the boarding fees incurred by the Town in connection with the 
impounding and keeping of said dog. 

Any amounts due from fines, boarding fees, or the sale of unclaimed dogs shall be 
paid to the Town Treasurer. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 5: TOP SOIL 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from Surplus Revenue the sum of $600.00, 
to be used by the Board of Selectmen to stockpile top soil on Town owned land. 

Article 6. 

VOTED: To pass over article. 

Article 7: SISSON LAND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to transfer the so- 
called Sisson Land now owned by the Town of Acton, and which abuts Mt. Hope 
Cemetery, to the Board of Cemetery Commissioners, to be used for Cemetery 
purposes. 

Article 8: ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Acton by deleting the entire Section IV-D and substituting in place thereof the 
following: 



89 



IV-D. Industrial District (I- 1) 

1. In an Industrial District (I-l), a building or structure may be 
erected or altered, and a building, structure or premise may 
be used for manufacturing, warehousing, wholesaling and for 
all uses as permitted in Section IV-C, 1 b, c, d, e, and f. 

2. The following and similar uses may be permitted by the Board 
of Appeals if adjudged non -detrimental to the neighborhood. 

a. Sawmill 

b. Kennel 

c. Stone Quarry 

d. Truck terminal 

e. Undertaking establishment 
f . Sand or gravel pit 

Article 9: ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Acton by adding after Section IV-D thereto the following: 

IV-E. Light Industrial District (1-2) 

In a Light Industrial District (1-2), a building or structure may 
be erected or altered, and a building, structure or premise may 
be used for the following purposes: 

1- Scientific or research laboratory, office for executive or 
administrative purposes, public utility or community use. 

2. Manufacturing electrical or electronic devices; medical, 
dental or drafting instruments, optical goods, watches or 
other precision instruments; light metal fabrication or 
finishing, but not including heavy punch presses or drop 
hammers. 

3. Garaging incident to any uses permitted under this section. 

4. Additional uses by special permit only. The Board of 
Appeals, may in a specific case, issue a special permit 
for any lawful storage, distribution or light manufacturing 
use, provided that such use is not in violation of the re- 
quirements of Section II-I. (Performance Standards) and 
that it meets the criteria of Section VI -B, 3. b. and 3. c, 
(Board of Appeals). 

Article 10: ZONING BYLAW 

MOTION: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Acton by adding to 
Section IV -B, 2 the following: 

i. Recreational uses conducted for a profit or otherwise, provided 
the same has unanimous prior approval of the Recreation Com- 
mission of the Town of Acton, excepting therefrom recreational 
uses appurtenant to a dwelling or dwellings. 

VOTED: To amend the original motion by adding at the end the following: 

The Recreation Commission shall hold a public hearing on each 
such proposed use before giving its approval; notice of such hear- 



90 



ing to be published in local newspapers for two consecutive weeks 
prior to the hearing. 

MOTION AS AMENDED LOST. 

Article 11: ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Acton by making the following changes: 

III. A. 2. To read: General Business District B 
Delete subparagraph a. and b. 

III. B. 2. Delete entirely (this phrasing used elsewhere) 

IV. C. To read: General Business District 

IV. C. 1. To read: The following uses are permitted in a General 
Business District (B). 

IV. C. 3. Delete entirely. 

V.A.5. Parking Area 

Subparagraph a. To include the first, second and fourth 
paragraphs under "5. Parking Area" in current bylaw. 

Subparagraph b. To read: In a General Business District, 
the following requirements shall apply to all uses as per- 
mitted in Section IV -C. 1. -b, c, e and f in all instances 
where the gross floor area of a building, or a group of 
contiguous buildings, to be erected or to be enlarged, 
exceeds 3,000 square feet: 

There shall be at least 300 square feet of parking area, 
exclusive of any areas required for the circulation or 
loading of vehicles, for each 100 square feet of gross 
building floor area, including basement areas, but exclud- 
ing building areas intended solely for storage. Where 
such parking area abuts a street, there shall be a strip 
not less than six (6) feet in width within the lot, measured 
at and parallel with the side line of the street, except at 
driveways required for access, which strip shall be land- 
scaped and maintained. Where such parking area abuts 
property being used for residential purposes or in a resi- 
dential district, there shall be a fence erected at or near 
the dividing property lines together with a strip not less 
than six (6) feet in width measured along and parallel to 
said property lines, which strip shall be landscaped and 
maintained to provide suitable screening between the 
properties. All plans for buildings to be erected, parking 
area, entrance and exit driveways, signs and lighting facil- 
ities shall be submitted to the Planning Board for prior 
approval before application for any permits shall be made. 
All signs on the premises shall meet with the approval of 
the Planning Board and be licensed by the Board of Select- 
men under Section II. D. 



91 



Article 12: ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Acton by making the following changes in Section V. B. (Intensity Regulation Schedule 
District and Uses). 

Delete all reference to schedule under B-2. 

Change B-1 to B. 

Add: 



Business Uses 
Bldgs. 3000 sq.ft. 
and under 



Bldgs. over 
3000 sq.ft. 



Minimum Lot 
Dimensions 



Minimum Yard 
Dimensions 



LotArea Front Side 

(Sq. Ft.) Frontage Yard Yard 

(Setback) 



None None 30 10)36 if adjacent 

)to residential 
)district or 

10,000 100 30 30)property used 

)for residential 
)purposes 



Maximum Heights 
of Buildings 

Stories 



Height above mean 
ground level: 30 ft, 
to highest point of 
building 



Article 13: ZONING BYLAW 



MOTION: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Acton and the 
'Zoning Map of the Town of Acton' by changing from Residential (R-2) to Light 
Industrial (1-2) the following described area of land in that part of Acton called 
West Acton: 

Parcel 1 



A certain parcel of land on the easterly side of Central Street in West 
Acton, containing 30.4 acres, more or less, and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the southerly side of Route 2, 958 feet south- 
east of the Acton-Boxborough Town Line and thence running 

NORTHWEST 



SOUTHWEST 



SOUTHWEST 



EASTERLY 



NORTHEAST 



by Route 2, 958 feet to the Acton-Boxborough Town 
Line, thence, 

by the Acton-Boxborough Town Line, 1168 feet, to the 
easterly sideline of Central Street, thence, 

by Central Street, 588 feet, to a point 150 feet northerly 
of the stonewall at land of St. Matthew's Methodist 
Church, thence, 

by a straight line, 680 feet to a point 150 feet northerly 
of a corner of a stonewall, thence, 

by a straight line, 1275 feet, to the point of beginning 
at Route 2. 



92 



Parcel 2 

A certain parcel of land on the westerly side of Central Street in West Acton, 
containing 0.76 acres, more or less, and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the westerly side of Central Street at the Acton-Box- 
borough Town Line and thence running 

SOUTHWESTERLY by Central Street, 440 feet, thence, 

WESTERLY by a line which forms a right angle with Central 

Street 150 feet, to the Acton-Boxborough Town 
Line, thence, 

NORTHEASTERLY by the Acton-Boxborough Town Line, 468 feet to 

the point of beginning at Central Street. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 14: STREETS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following streets, or portions thereof, con- 
structed under the requirements of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town Clerk: 

Ethan Allen Drive, in Flagg Hill Estates Subdivision, 1365 feet ±, from 
the end of the previously accepted section, in a southwesterly direction 
to the southerly line of Ticonderoga Road 

Ticonderoga Road, in Flagg Hill Estates Subdivision, 619 feet ±, from 
Ethan Allen Drive in a southeasterly direction to the easterly line of 
Flintlock Drive 

Black Horse Drive, in Flagg Hill Estates Subdivision, 625 feet ±, from 
Ethan Allen Drive in a southeasterly direction to the easterly line of 
Flintlock Drive. 

Powder Horn Lane, in Flagg Hill Estates Subdivision, 788 feet ±, from 
Ticonderoga Road in a northeasterly direction to Black Horse Drive 

Flintlock Drive, in Flagg Hill Estates Subdivision, 718 feet ±, from 
Ticonderoga Road in a northeasterly direction to Black Horse Drive, 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes 
where shown on said plans. 

Article 15. 

VOTED: to pass over article. 

Article 16: STREETS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following streets, or portions thereof, con- 
structed under the requirements of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town Clerk: 

Joseph Reed Lane, in Minuteman Ridge Subdivision, 1030 feet ±, from 
Hayward Road in a southwesterly direction to Station 13 + 76 ± just north 
of Deacon Hunt Drive 

Capt. Brown's Lane, in Minuteman Ridge Subdivision, 750 feet ±, from 
Deacon Hunt Drive to Station 7 -f 70 ± just north of proposed Capt. Forbush 
Lane 



93 



including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes 
where shown on said plans. 

Article 17: STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following street, or portions thereof, con- 
structed under the requirements of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town Clerk: 

Jefferson Drive, in Patriots Hill Subdivision, 1015 feet ± from Hayward 
Road in a northerly and northeasterly direction to Station 10 + 40 ±, 165 
feet ± southwest of proposed Musket Drive, 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes 
where shown on said plans. 

Article 18: STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following street, or portions thereof, con- 
structed under the requirements of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town Clerk: 

Old Colony Lane, in Thoreau Park Subdivision, 402.5 feet ± from Laws 
Brook Road in a southwesterly direction to the southwesterly sideline of 
a 62.5 foot radius cul-de-sac 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes 
where shown on said plans. 

Article 19: STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following street, or portions thereof, con- 
structed under the requirements of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town Clerk: 

Houghton Lane, in Houghton Park Subdivision, 488 feet ± from Arlington 
Street in a northerly direction to the northerly sideline of a 62.5 foot 
radius cul-de-sac 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes 
where shown on said plans. 

Article 20: STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following street, or portions thereof, con- 
structed under the requirements of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town Clerk: 

Huckleberry Lane, in Stonehedge Subdivision, 496 feet ± from Coughlin 
Street in a northwesterly direction to Station 6 + 11 ± southeasterly at 
northerly sideline of a 62.5 foot radius cul-de-sac 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes 
where shown on said plans. 

Article 21: STREETS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following streets, or portions thereof, con- 
structed under the requirements of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town Clerk: 

94 



Hennessey Drive, in Prospect Acres Subdivision, 732 feet ± from 
Prospect Street in a northeasterly direction to Station 7 + 51.54 

St. James Circle, in Prospect Acres Subdivision, 292 feet ± from 
Hennessey Drive in a northwesterly direction to the northwesterly 
sideline of a 62,5 foot radius cul-de-sac 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes 
where shown on said plans. 

Article 22: WEST ACTON LIBRARY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from Surplus Revenue the sum of $206.00 
for the Salaries and Wages Account of the West Acton Library. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 11:45 P. M. 



A true copy. Attest 



CHARLES M. MacRAE 
Town Clerk 



Amendments to the Town Bylaw (Articles 41 and 42), Building Bylaw (Articles 
43, 46, 47 and 50) and Zoning Bylaw (Articles 53, 54 and 55) adopted by the Town at 
the Annual Town Meeting, March 8, 1965, were approved by Attorney General Edward 
W. Brooke on May 3, 1965. 

Amendments to the Town Bylaw (Article 7) and Zoning Bylaw (Articles 8, 9, 11 
and 12) adopted by the Town at the Special Town Meeting, November 15, 1965, were 
approved by Attorney General Edward W. Brooke on December 7, 1965. 



95 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



163, 


,330. 


.00 


12, 


,000, 


.00 


20, 


,000, 


.00 



To The honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The reports which are submitted herewith represent a statement of the cash disburse- 
ments authorized during the year ended December 31, 1965, and a Balance Sheet of the Town 
of Acton as at December 31, 1965. 

The 1966 amortization of bonded indebtedness of the Town, and Acton's share of the 
Regional School District bond amortization are: 

Schools 

Julia McCarthy Elementary School $ 15,000.00 

Julia McCarthy School Addition 10,000.00 

Florence Merriam Elementary School 40,000.00 

Elm Street Elementary School 40,000.00 

Regional School District 58, 330.00 

Total Schools 
South Acton Fire House 
Police Station 

Amortization of bonded indebtedness 195,330.00 

Add - Anticipated 1966 bond amortization of 

Acton Memorial Library bonds authorized, 

but not issued 25,000.00 

$220,330.00 

The accounts of the Treasurer, Collector and Manager of the School Cafeteria have 
been verified, and I have reviewed the various trust funds in the custody of the 
Treasurer and Trustees. 

I extend sincere appreciation to Mr. Donald O. Nylander, Town Accountant from 1951 
to 1965, for the assistance, advice and cooperation he has given me during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT J. ERICKSON 
Town Accountant 

STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS AND CASH DISBURSEMENTS 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1965 

Appropriated 

or Cash 

Available Disbursed Balance 
General Government: 
Moderator: 

Salary $ 160.00 $ 120.00 $ 40.00 

Finance Committee: 

Expenses 200.00 110.25 89.75 

Selectmen: 

Salaries 1,650.00 1,650.00 

Expenses 3,800.00 3,758.89 41.11 

Legal services 3,500.00 3,337.95 162.05 

Extra legal services 3,000.00 1,553.29 1,446.71 

Appraisals 1,000.00 - 1,000.00 

Town Office Clerical Staff: 

Salaries 31,415.00 28,999.48 2,415.52 

Engineering Department: 

Salaries and wages 14,480.00 11,486.63 2,993.37 

Expenses 1,900.00 684.72 1,215.28 



96 




General Government - continued! 



Accountant: 
Salary 
Expenses 

Treasurer - Collector: 
Salary 
Expenses 

Assessors: 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Clerk: 

Salary 
Expenses 

1965 State Census - 
Appropriated - 

Transferred to Elections 
and Registrations (A) 
Available from 1964 

Elections and Registration: 
Salaries and wages - 
Appropriated 

Transferred from 1965 Census (A) 
Expenses 

Planning Board: 
Expenses 
Guarantee deposits - 

Available from 1964 

Cash received 1965 

Personnel Board: 
Expenses 

Board of Appeals: 
Expenses 
Guarantee deposits - 

Available from 1964 

Cash received 1965 

Industrial Development Commission: 
Expenses 

Conservation Commission: 
Expenses 

Archives Committee: 
Expenses 

Public Ceremonies and 
Celebrations Committee: 
Expenses 

Appropriated • 

Reserve fund transfer 

Buildings and Grounds: 
Salaries and wages 
Expenses 
Capital outlay 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 


Cash 
Disbursed 


Balance 


$ 2,700.00 
170.00 


$ 2,624,62 
130.05 


$ 75.38 
39.95 


6,775.00 
2,800.00 


6,775.00 
2,789.08 


10.92 


4,000.00 
2,200.00 


4,000.00 
2,033.16 


166.84 


2,150.00 
500.00 


2,150.00 
417.84 


82.16 


2,500.00 


584.54 


1,915.46 


(300.00) 
500.00 


500.00 


(300.00) 



1,825.00 


1 


,825.00 


- 


300.00 




231.24 


68.76 


2,500.00 


1 


,728.97 


771.03 


1,500.00 




754.96 


74'5.04 


42.75 




42.75 


^ 


325.00 




136.50 


188.50 


650.00 




527.00 


123.00 



25.00 



61.00 



1,000.00 
100.67 



6,510.00 

10,735.00 

1,150.00 



25.00 



13.50 


13.50 


- 


80.00 


37.50 


42.50 


♦ 650.00 


125.00 


525.00 


300.00 


80.13 


219.87 



18.50 



1, -000. 00 
100.67 



4,936.71 

10,210.94 

1,150.00 



42.50 



1,573.29 
524.06 



Town Report Committee: 
Expenses 



2,415.00 



2,415.00 



97 



Appropriated 

or Cash 

General Government - continued: Available Disbursed Balance 

Total General Government 

Appropriated $114,221.00 $ 98,233.95 $15,987.05 

Available from 1964 556.25 556.25 

Cash collected 1965 405.00 174.00 231.00 

Reserve fund transfer 100.67 100.67 - 



115,282.92 99,064.87 16,218.05 

Protection of Persons and Property: 
Police Department: 

Salaries and wages 
Expenses 
Capital outlay- 
Fire Department: 

Salaries and wages 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 
Insurance recovery 
Capital outlay 

Sealer of Weights and Measures: 
Salary and travel 
Expenses 

Moth Department: 
Wages 
Expenses > 

Town Forest Committee: 
Maintenance 

Tree Department: 
Wages 
Expenses 

Wire Inspector: 

Wages and travel 
Expenses 

Inspector of Gas Piping and Appliances: 
Wages - 

Appropriated 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Reserve fund transfer 640.00 610.00 30.00 

Expenses 100.00 - 100.00 

Building Inspector and Agent for 
Enforcement of Zoning By-Laws: 

Salary and wages 6,490.00 6,331.60 158.40 

Expenses 1,115.00 921.61 193.39 

Dog Officer: 

Wages and travel 520.00 520.00 

Building Committee: 

Expenses 50.00 20.15 29.85 

Civil Defense: 

Expenses 265.00 257.14 7 .86 

Total Protection of Persons and Property: 

Appropriated 226,124.00 217,505.95 8,618.05 

Insurance recovery 1,379.42 1,379.42 

Reserve fund transfer 640.00 610.00 30.00 

228,143.42 219,495.37 8,648.05 



77,570.00 


75, 


,328.74 


2,241.26 


10,125.00 


10, 


,107.49 


17.51 


2,000.00 


1, 


,793.00 


207.00 


75,310.00 


69, 


,845.70 


5,464.30 


36,634.00 


36, 


,620.46 


13.54 


1,379.42 


1, 


,379.42 


- 


970.00 




933.00 


37.00 


365.00 




365.00 


_ 


60.00 




51.99 


8.01 


3,915.00 


3, 


,865.10 


49.90 


2,000.00 


1, 


,909.97 


90.03 


100.00 




100.00 


- 


3,610.00 


3, 


,610.00 


_ 


1,900.00 


1, 


,900.00 


— 


2,000.00 


2, 


,000.00 


_ 


25.00 




25.00 


- 



98 



Highways : 

General highway maintenance : 
Appropriated 
Insurance recovery 
Reserve fund transfer 

Drainage 

Chapter 81 - Highway: 
Appropriated 

Borrowed in anticipation of 
State reimbursement 

Chapter 90 - Highways : 
Appropriated 

Borrowed in anticipation of 
State reimbursement 

Snow removal 

Traffic signs and lines 

Vacations and holidays 

Sidewalk maintenance 

Highway machinery maintenance : 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 

Street lighting 

Capital outlay 

Town Dump : 

Salaries : 

Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 
Expenses 

Total Highways : 

Appropriated 
Insurance recovery 
Reserve fund transfer 
Borrowed in anticipation of 
State reimbursement 



Health and Sanitation: 

Health and sanitation: 
Salaries 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 
Garbage collection 

Inspector of Animals: 
Wages 
Expenses 

Plumbing Inspector: 
Wages - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

Total Health and Sanitation: 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 



Appropriated 






or 


Cash 




Available 


Disbursed 


Balance 


$ 14,885.00 


$ 14,885.00 


_ 


110.00 


110.00 




300.00 


287.07 


$ 12.93 


11,012.00 


10,888.19 


123.81 


19,250.00 


19,250.00 


- 


20, 350.00 


20,303.35 


46.65 


4,500.00 


4,500.00 


- 


1,500.00 


431.02 


1,068.98 


40,500.00 


34,455.65 


6,044.35 


4,560.00 


4,554.03 


5.97 


3,220.00 


3,220.00 


- 


500.00 


496.07 


3.93 


12,900.00 


12,900.00 


_ 


1,500.00 


1,433.16 


66.84 


16,500.00 


15,795.32 


704.68 


2,125.00 


2,124.95 


.05 



5,665.00 


5,665.00 




- 


75.00 


48.54 




26.46 


1,600.00 


1,593.69 




6.31 


137,217.00 


130,327.90 


6 


889.10 


110.00 


110.00 




- 


1,875.00 


1,768.77 




106.23 


21,850.00 


20.734.37 


L 


115.63 


161,052.00 


152,941.04 


8j 


110.96 


13,095.00 


12,035.30 


1 


059.70 


11,095.00 


10,918.92 




176.08 


985.00 


- 




985.00 


13,650.00 


13,644.84 




5.16 


150.00 


150.00 




_ 


30.00 


21.50 




8.50 



2,000.00 
700.00 

40,020.00 
1,685.00 

41,705.00 



2,000.00 
568.00 

38,770.56 
568.00 

39,338.56 



132.00 

1, 249.44 
1,117.00 

2, 366.44 



99 





AppropriatecJ 












or 




Cash 








Available 




Disburseci 




Balance 


Charities: 












Aciministration: 












Salary - Welfare Board - 












AppropriatecJ 


$ 200.00 


$ 


200.00 




- 


Fecieral funcJs - 












Available from 1964 


184.59 




150.00 


$ 


34.59 


Grants 1965 


86.20 




- 




86.20 


Public Assistance 


50,000.00 




50,000.00 




_ 



Welfare Boarti - Fecieral funcSs: 
Disability Assistance - 
Available from 1964 
Cash receivecJ 1965 



676.07 
443.34 



676.07 
443.34 



Old Age Assistance - 

Available from 1964 
Cash received 1965 
Lien recoveries 

Aid to Dependent Children 
Available from 1964 
Cash received 1965 

Medical Aid to Aged - 

Available from 1964 
Cash received 1965 

Total Charities: 

Appropr i ated 

Federal funds - 

Available - 1964 
Received - 1965 

Lien recoveries 



Veterans' Aid: 

Veterans' service: 
Salary 
Expenses 
Aid - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

Total Veterans' Aid: 

Education: 

Appropriated : 

Instruction - 

Local 

Regional 
Plant operation and maintenance 

Local 

Regional 
Transportation - 

Local 

Regional 
Non-instructional service - 

Local 

Regional 
Administration - 

Local 

Regional 
Blanchard Auditorium - 

Local 

Regional 
Capital outlay - 

Local 

Regional 



21,272.68 

16,986.40 

3,825.01 



5,921.52 
9,294.58 



4,433.01 
20,579.83 



460,564.00 
423,809.65 

51,937.00 
37,799.13 

53,980.00 
20,305.03 

6,450.00 
15,535.84 

13,400.00 
14,022.48 

10,500.00 
6,180.76 

3,540.00 
881.20 



19,842.05 



5,921.52 
7,474.99 



4,433.01 
19,344.87 



453,332.62 
423,809.65 

51,932.78 
37,799.13 

53,980.00 
20,305.03 

3,975.99 
15,535.84 

13,237.52 
14,022.48 

9,097.60 
6,180.76 

3,051.12 
881.20 



1,430.63 

16,986.40 

3,825.01 



1,819.59 



1,234.96 



50,200.00 


50,200.00 




_ 


32,487.87 

47,390.35 

3,825.01 


31,022.65 
27,263.20 


1, 
20, 
_3, 

25, 


,465.22 

,127.15 
,825.01 


133,903.23 


108,485.85 


,417.38 


1,775.00 
275.00 


1,767.31 
270.75 




7.69 
4.25 


8,500.00 
1,590.00 


8,500.00 
1,418.80 




171.20 


12,140.00 


11,956.86 




183.14 



7,231.38 



4.22 



2,474.01 



162.48 



1,402.40 



488.88 



100 



Education - continued: 

Contingency fund - 

Local 

Regional 
Athletic fund - Regional 

School maintenance: 

Federal Public Law 815 - 
Available from 1964 

Federal Public Law 874 - 
Available from 1964 
Received in 1965 

Cafeteria: 

Available from 1964 
Cash received 1965 

Total Education: 

Appropriated - 

Local 

Regional 
Federal funds - 

Available from 1964 

Received 1965 
Cafeteria 



Libraries : 

Memorial Library - 

Salaries and wages 

Expenses 

Books - 

Appropriated 
Tainter Fund 
Capital outlay 

West Acton - Citizens' Library 
Salaries and wages- 
Appropriated 
Transferred from 
Surplus Revenue (B) 
Expenses 

Total Libraries: 
Appropriated 
Transferred 



Recreation: 
Wages : 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 
Expenses 
Capital outlay 

Total Recreation 

Cemeteries : 

Salaries and wages 
Expenses 
Capital outlay 

Funds : 

Perpetual care - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 



Appropriated 

or 

Available 



1,000.00 

532.17 

8,093.91 



819.68 

39,165.15 
18,483.00 



12,278.52 
72,522.58 



601,371.00 
527,160.17 



Cash 
Disbursed 



990.24 

532.17 

8,093.91 



25,201.10 



12,278.52 
61,351.62 



589,597.87 
527,160.17 



25,201.10 
73,630.14 
1,271,800.10 1,215,589.28 



39,984.83 
18,483.00 
84,801.10 



13,050.00 
4,760.00 

9,000.00 

1,118.06 

300.00 



12,034.02 
2,808.07 



9,000.00 

1,118.06 

286.89 



Balance 



9.76 



819.68 

13,964.05 
18,483.00 



11,170,96 



11,773.13 



14,783.73 
18,483.00 
11.170.96 

56,210.82 



1,015.98 
1,951.93 



13.11 



645.00 


645.00 


- 


206.00 


202.43 


3.57 


750.00 


748.84 


1.16 


28,505.00 


25,522.82 


2,982.18 


1,324.06 


1,320.49 


3.57 


29,829.06 


26,843.31 


2,985.75 


3,342.00 


3,342.00 




85.29 


85.29 


- 


1,106.00 


1,095.91 


10.09 


500.00 


228.75 


271.25 


5.033.29 


4.751.95 


281.34 


19,300.00 


19,295.17 


4.83 


3,766.00 


3,761.80 


4.20 


900.00 


889.00 


11.00 



608.51 
2,000.00 



608.51 
448.75 



1,551.25 



101 



Cemeteries - continued: 

Hosmer - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 

Blanchard - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 

Wetherbee - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 

Robbins - 

Transferred 1965 

Appleyard - 

Transferred 1965 

Whitney - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1955 

Hoit St Scott - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 

Raymond - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 

Knowlton - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 

Davis - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 

Watson - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 

Wells - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 

Ames - 

Available from 1964 

O'Neil - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 

Conant - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 

Total Cemeteries: 

Appropriated 

Funds - 

Available from 1964 
Transferred 1965 



Insurance: 

Workmen's compensation 

Surety bond 

Fire insurance on Town buildings; 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 

Boiler and machinery: 
Appropriated 
Refund - 1965 

Motor vehicle liability: 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 


Cash 
Disbursed 


Balance 


$ 333.90 
2,500.00 


$ 
1, 


333.90 
,530.70 


$ 969.30 


21.25 
35.00 




21.25 
4.80 


30.20 


40.27 
100.00 




40.27 
83.88 


16.12 


15.00 




4.00 


11.00 


30.00 




26.50 


3.50 


31.56 
50.00 




20.50 


11.06 
50.00 


40.01 
25.00 




10.55 


29.46 
25.00 


51.68 
50.00 




32.50 


19.18 
50.00 


50.73 
50.00 




25.60 


25.13 
50.00 


23.80 
20.00 




17.80 


6.00 
20.00 


.41 
100.00 




.41 
33.34 


66.66 


21.50 
50.00 




21.50 
3.30 


46.70 


29.36 




9.50 


19.86 


11.65 
50.00 




7.35 


4.30 
50.00 


18.45 
25.00 




18.45 
1.05 


23.95 


23,966.00 


23, 


,945.97 


20.03 


1,283.08 
5,100.00 


1, 
2, 


,168.09 
,136.32 


114.99 
2,963.68 


30,349.08 


27, 


,250.38 


3,098.70 


5,000.00 


4, 


,093.10 


906.90 


500.00 




396.00 


104.00 


5,100.00 
656.05 


5, 


,100.00 
656.05 


- 


720,00 
18.00 




709.57 


10.43 
18.00 


3,340.00 
152.27 


3, 


,340.00 
152.27 


- 



102 



Insurance - continuecJ: 

Money ancJ securities: 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 

Group health 

Fire fighters ' insurance 

Teachers' liability-Corporal punishment: 
Reserve fund transfer 

Total Insurance: 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 
Refund 



Pensions : 

Expenses 

Maturing Debt and Interest: 
Regional School: 

Maturing debt 
Interest 

Julia McCarthy Elementary School; 
Maturing debt 
Interest 

Julia McCarthy Addition: 
Maturing debt 
Interest 

Florence E. Merriam School: 
Maturing debt 
Interest 

South Acton Fire House: 
Maturing debt 
Interest 

Chapter 81 and 90 Highways: 
Maturing debt 
Interest 

Elementary School Land: 
Maturing debt 
Interest 

Police Station: 

Maturing debt 
Interest 

Anticipation of revenue notes: 
Interest - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

New Elementary School: 
Interest 

Library Addition: 
Interest' 



Appropriated 

or 
Available 


Cash 
Disbursed 


Balance 


$ ■ 150.00 
63.27 


$ 150.00 
63.27 


_ 


9,200.00 


9,191.14 


8.86 


390.00 


371.25 


18.75 


191.55 


191.55 

23,351.06 
1,063.14 


_ 


24,400.00 

1,063.14 

18.00 


1,048.94 
18.00 


25,481.14 


24,414.20 


1,066.94 


16,835.00 


16,834.95 


.05 


71,499.56 
88,008.79 


71,499.56 
88,008.79 


- . 


15,000.00 
2,200.00 


15,000.00 
2,200.00 


- 


10,000.00 
780.00 


10,000.00 
780.00 




45,000.00 
18,900.00 


45,000.00 
18,900.00 


- 


12,000.00 
600.00 


12,000.00 
600.00 


- 


41,075.00 
835.02 


41,075.00 
835.02 


- 


40,000.00 
868.69 


40,000,00 
868.69 


- 


20,000.00 
2,800.00 


20,000.00 
2,800.00 


- 



1,800.00 
1,536.67 



16,000.00 
3,000.00 



1,800.00 
1,536.67 



16,000.00 
3,000.00 



103 



Maturing Debt and Interest - continued: 

Total Maturing Debt and Interest: 
Maturing debt 
Interest - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 



Special Articles: 



Appropriated 

or 

Available 



$254,574.56 

135,792,50 
1,536.67 

391,903.73 



Cash 
Disbursed 



$254,574.56 

116,792.50 
1,536.67 

372,903.73 



Balance 



$19,000.00 



19,000.00 



Town 




Meeting 


Article 


Date 


No. 


3-12-55 


23 ( 


3- 9-59 


17 ( 


3-13-61 


29 ] 


3-12-62 


40 


3-12-62 


46 1 


3-11-63 


39 ] 


9- 9-63 


8 ( 


1-20-64 


3 


3- 9-64 


14 


3- 9-64 


23 


3- 9-64 


25 


3- 9-64 


32 i 


6- 8-64 


3 


6- 8-64 


4 ( 


3- 8-65 


9 


3- 8-65 


10 ] 


3- 8-65 


11 


3- 8-65 


12 ] 


3- 8-65 


18 ( 


3- 8-65 


19 ( 


3- 8-65 


20 


3- 8-65 


21 


3- 8-65 


22 


3- 8-65 


24 


3- 8-65 


25 


3- 8-65 


29 1 


3- 8-65 


30 


3- 8-65 


31 


3- 8-65 


32 1 


3- 8-65 


33 1 


6- 7-65 


4 1 


3- 8-65 


34 i 


3- 8-65 


35 1 


3- 8-65 


38 



Purpose 
Available from 1964: 
Oiling Mt. Hope Cemetery 
Clearing Mt. Hope Cemetery 
Martin St. culvert & bridge 
Parker St. intersection 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Fire alarm circuit split 
Chapter 782 construction - 

Arlington and Parker Streets 
Assessors' map 
Police Station construction 
Bell and clock system - 

Towne School 
Repaint interior-Towne School 
Sewerage Study Committee 
Accounting equipment 
Oiling Mt. Hope Cemetery 

Appropriated 1965: 
Revaluation 

New Way & High Street taking 
Parker & Independence taking 
High Street (new way) 
Conservation land purchase 

from Conservation Fund 
Conservation Fund 
Police cruisers 
Vocational tuition and 

transportation 
Town Hall sprinkler 
Fire cruiser and radio 
Police Station furniture 

and fixtures 
Highway Dept. Pick-up Truck 
Tag-along road sweeper 
Pick-up sweeper 
Material spreader - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 
Mt. Hope Cemetery fence 
Mt. Hope Cemetery fence 
Cemetery Building Committee 
Water Safety Program 
Auxiliary Fire Department 



Total Special Articles: 
Available from 1964 
Appropriated - 1965 
Reserve fund transfer 



294.02 


294.02 


- 


1,154.50 


410.50 


744.00 


2,500.00 


2,500.00 


- 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 


- 


812.00 


612.50 


199.50 


270.00 


260.00 


10.00 


9,931.11 


9,915.08 


16.03 


4,753.55 


1,397.49 


3,356.06 


46,857,65 


46,811.32 


46.33 


1,250.00 


1,250.00 


_ 


9,000.00 


9,000.00 


- 


250.00 


214.7 5 


35.25 


183.66 


122.61 


61.05 


600.00 


170.06 


429.94 


22,000.00 


16,100.00 


5,900.00 


3,000.00 


2,400.00 


600.00 


3,500.00 


3,000.00 


500.00 


6,900.00 


602.00 


6,298.00 


4,500.00 


4,500.00 


_ 


8,602.30 


8,602.30 


- 


3,500.00 


3,377.00 


123.00 


2,000.00 


1,468.20 


531.80 


6,000.00 


726.37 


5,273.63 


3,250.00 


3,250.00 


- 


5,000.00 


4,995.53 


4.47 


1,993.00 


1,989.50 


3.50 


1,600.00 


1,600.00 


- 


13,500.00 


13,500.00 


- 


2,500.00 


2,500.00 


_ 


55.00 


55.00 


- 


2,025.00 


2,025.00 


- 


150.00 


128.00 


22.00 


400.00 


4.20 


395.80 


3,328.00 


3,228.00 


100.00 


376.00 


362.55 


13.45 


79,056.49 


74,158.33 


4,898.16 


94,124.30 


74,358.65 


19,765.65 


55.00 


5 5.00 
148,571.98 


_ 


173,235.79 


24,663.18 



104 



Building Construction: 

Acton Memorial Library: 

Available from 1964 - 
10-28-63 # 5 
3- 9-64 #18 
6- 8-64 # 2 

Elm Street Elementary School: 
Available from 1964 
Bond issue 

From Stabilization Fund 
State aid 

Total Building Construction: 
Available from 1964 
Bond issue 
Stabilization Fund 
State aid 



Fire Department Ladder Truck: 
From Stabilization Fund 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 



265.00 

8,000.00 

10,000.00 



25,266.34 

725,000.00 

75,000.00 

75,000.00 



43,531,34 

725,000.00 

75,000.00 

75,000.00 

918,531.34 



32,000.00 



Cash 
Disbursed 



265.00 
8,000.00 
6,836.76 



25,266.34 
22,121.93 
75,000.00 
75,000.00 



40,368.10 
22,121.93 
75,000.00 
75,000.00 

212,490.03 



32,000.00 



Balance 



$ 3,163.24 



702,878.07 



3,163.24 
702,878,07 



706,041.31 



Total Departmental Items: 

Appropriated in 1965 
Available from 1964 
Reserve fund transfer 
Insurance recovery 
Borrowed funds 
Federal and State aid 
Stabilization Fund 
Other 



Other Cash Disbursements: 
Agency: 

State audit of municipal accounts 
State parks and reservations 
State motor vehicle excise bills 
Middlesex County tax 

Middlesex County Hospital assessment 
Middlesex County dog licenses 
Withheld Federal income taxes 
Withheld State income taxes 
Blue Cross - Blue Shield 
Middlesex County Retirement Assoc, 
Mass. Teachers' Retirement Fund 
Acton Teachers ' Insurance 
Acton Employees' life insurance 
Acton Teachers ' Association 

Trust: 

Conservation ($4,500 listed in 

Article 18 of 3-8-65) 
Charity 
Cemeteries 

Firemen's Relief Fund. 
Trust fund income 

Refunds: 

Taxes 

Board of Health 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Building permits 
Committed interest and 
street assessment 



2,290,008.53 

124,427.16 

8,630.77 

1,489,42 

746,850.00 

213,346.05 

107,000.00 

95,473.17 



,202,381.63 

116,250.77 

7,206.34 

1,489.42 

42,856.30 

158,486.95 

107,000.00 

77,260.95 



3,587,225.10 2,712,932.36 



1,270.01 

4,733,79 

1,039,20 

47,656,74 

495,74 

2,103,75 
97,609,91 
12,941.84 

9,014.93 
15,246.38 
20,132.26 

2,223.93 
821.80 

1,360.00 



525.00 

2,950,00 

280,00 

20,002.26 



21,591.88 

5.00 

14.25 

240.00 

32.61 



87,626.90 
8,176.39 
1,424.43 

703,993,70 
54,859.10 

18,212,22 

874,292,74 



105 



Cash 

Other Cash Disbursements - continued: Disbursed 

Premium on bond $ 2,390.90 

Anticipation of revenue notes 400,000.00 

Investment in Certificate of Deposit 800,000.00 

Cemetery Department 31.04 

Total Cash Disbursed 4,177,645.58 

Add - Checks cancelled 1, 301. 52 

Total cash paid in 1965 on order of 
Board of Selectmen, as shown in 

Town Treasurer's report $4,178, 947 .10 

Footnote: 

(A) - Article 3, Special Town Meeting, November 15, 1965 J 

(B) - Article 22, Special Town Meeting, November 15, 1965 i 

il 

The unexpended balances of the following Special Articles were closed out at the end i 

of 1965 to Surplus Revenue: "^ 

Town !i 

Meeting Article | 

Date No. Purpose Balance ,.| 

I 

3-14-60 29 Town dump addition $ 1,000.00 

3-11-63 39 Fire alarm circuit split 10.00 

3-11-63 40 Chapter 782 construction 

Arlington and 

9- 9-63 8 Parker Street 16.03 

10-28-63 3 Police Station land 100.00 

3- 8-65 10 New Way and High Street taking 600.00 

3- 8-65 11 Parker and Independence land taking 500.00 

3- 8-65 20 Police cruisers 123.00 

3- 8-65 21 Vocational tuition and transportation 531.80 

3- 8-65 26 Police Station, furniture and fixtures 4.47 

3- 8-65 29 Highway Department pick-up truck 3.50 

3- 8-65 35 Water Safety Program 100.00 

Total $2,988.80 



106 



The Finance Committee approved the following transfers from the Reserve Fund during 
the year ended December 31, 1965: 

Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee $ 100.67 

Inspector of Gas Piping and Appliances 640.00 

Highways : 

General highway maintenance 300.00 

Highway machinery maintenance 1,500.00 

Town Dump - salaries 7 5.00 

Health and Sanitation: 

Health and sanitation - expenses 985.00 

Plumbing Inspector - wages 700.00 

Veterans' Aid 1,590.00 

Recreation - wages 85.29 

Insurance: 

Fire insurance on Town buildings 656.05 

Motor vehicle liability 152.27 

Money and securities 63.27 

Teachers' liability - corporal punishment 191.55 

Maturing Debt and Interest: 

Anticipation of revenue notes 1,536.67 

Special Articles - Material spreader 55 .00 

Total Transfers from Reserve Fund $8,630.77 



107 



ASSETS 



TOWN OF 

BALANCE 

DECEMBER 



Cash: 

Petty cash funds 
General funds 
Conservation fund 
Certificates of deposit 

Accounts receivable: 



$ 70.00 
400,396.82 
22,169.29 
800,000.00 $1,222,636.11 



Tax levies: 












1964-Real estate 


$ 3,376. 


,00 








Personal property 


318. 


.20 


3, 


,694. 


.20 


1965-Real estate 


40,464. 


.12 








Personal property 


6,522, 


,80 


46, 


,986. 


,92 


Total Property Taxes 






50, 


,681. 


,12 


Street assessment and 












committed interest-1965 








118. 


,64 



Motor vehicle excise: 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 

Tax titles 

Tax possessions 

Taxes in litigation 



Departmental : 

Recreation 

Citizens' Library 

Planning Board 

School 

Cemetery 

Highway 

Veterans ' Aid 



2, 

6, 

30^ 



444.28 
086.53 
708.64 
863.34 



1, 



183.69 
305.80 



77.50 
11.00 
50.00 
166.61 
119.00 
891.64 
4,025.69 
Aid to Dependent Children 2,653.44 



Aid to highways : 

Commonwealth of Mass. 
Middlesex County 

Under-estimate of assessment: 

1965 Middlesex County Tax 



67, 
15, 



016.80 
300.00 



40,102.79 

1,489.49 
153.38 



7,994.88 



82,316.80 



182,857.10 



3,248.68 



Total Assets 



$1,408,741.89 



108 



ACTON 
SHEET 
31, 1965 

LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Employees' payroll deductions - $ 14,193.79 

See Schedule 1 

Guarantee deposits: 

Board of Appeals $ 42.50 

Planning Board 188.50 231.00 

Unclaimed checks 279.7 6 

Trust fund income transfer balances 

unexpended - See Schedule 2 2,578.57 

Federal grants - See Schedule 3 58,684.11 

Revolving fund - School Dept. Cafeteria 11,170.96 

Unexpended appropriation balances - 

See Schedule 4 810,495.54 

Middlesex County dog license fees 96.50 

Conservation Fund 16,939.43 

Cemetery Land Fund 4,755.35 

Road Machinery Fund 2,865.54 

Tax title foreclosures 180.00 

Bond Forfeiture 577.82 

Over-estimate, 1965 Assessment - State Park 397.33 

Premiums on notes issued: 

Police Station 90.00 

Elm Street Elementary School 3,000.60 3,090.60 

Library receipts reserved for appropriations 1,809.50 

Reserve for petty cash funds 70.00 

Revenue reserved until collected: 

Street assessment and committee 

interest - 1965 118.64 

Motor vehicle and trailer excise 40,102.79 

Tax titles and possessions 1,489.49 

Taxes in litigation 153.38 

Departmental 7,994.88 

Aid to highways 82,316.80 132,175.98 

Overlays reserved for abatements of 
tax levies : 

1964 3,694.20 

1965 8,850.62 12,544.82 

Overlay surplus - reserve fund 14,637.76 

Surplus revenue 320, 967 .43 

Total Liabilities and Reserves $1,408, 741 .89 



109 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
Apportioned Street Assessments Not Due $ 8, 857 . 80 



LOANS IN ANTICIPATION OF STATE AND COUNTY REIMBURSEMENT 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 21,850.00 

Middlesex County 1, 500.00 

23,350.00 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



LOANS AUTHORIZED - NOT ISSUED 

Elm Street Elementary School 7 5,000.00 

Acton Memorial Library Addition 200,000.00 

275,000.00 



Net Funded on Fixed Debt 1,448,000.00 



TRUST ACCOUNTS 

Trust Funds - Cash and Securities: 

In Custody of the Town Treasurer 448,726,77 

In Custody of Trustees 3,465 .44 

$ 452,192.21 



110 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
Street Assessments and Betterment $ 8,857.80 



LOAN IN ANTICIPATION OF STATE AND COUNTY REIMBURSEMENT 

Chapter 81 20,350.00 

Chapter 90, Maintenance 3,000.00 

23,350.00 



LOANS AUTHORIZED - NOT ISSUED 

Elm Street Elementary School 75,000.00 

Acton Memorial Library Addition 200,000.00 

275,000.00 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Inside Debt Limit: 

Florence A. Merriam Elementary School $120,000.00 

Julia McCarthy Elementary School 25,000.00 

Julia McCarthy School Addition 20,000.00 

South Acton Fire House 12,000.00 

Police Station 80,000.00 

Elm Street Elementary School land 36,000.00 293,000.00 

Outside Debt Limit: 

Florence A. Merriam Elementary School 360,000.00 

Julia McCarthy Elementary School 70,000.00 

Elm Street Elementary School 725,000.00 1,155,000.00 

1,448,000.00 

TRUST ACCOUNTS 

In Custody of Town Treasurer - see Schedule 5 448,7 26.77 

In Custody of Trustees: 

Charlotte Goodnow 3,465.44 

$ 452,192.21 



111 



BALANCE SHEET 
Supporting Schedules 
December 31, 1955 

Schedule 1 
Employees ' Payroll Deductions 

Federal income taxes $10,160.44 

Massachusetts income taxes 1,390.06 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield 786.90 

Middlesex County Retirement System 1,535.57 

Group Life Insurance 220.82 

Acton Teachers ' Association 100 .00 

$14,193.79 



Schedule 2 
Trust Fund Income Transfer Balances 

Perpetual care 1,051.25 

Susan Noyes Hosmer 969.30 

Elbridge Robbins 11.00 

Arlette Appleyard 3.50 

Luke Blanchard 30.20 

J. Roland Wetherbee 16.12 

Georgia E. Whitney 61.06 

Hoitt and Scott 54.46 

Henry S. Raymond 69.18 

Frank Knowlton 7 5.13 

Robert I. Davis 26.00 

Sarah A. Watson 66.66 

Carrie F. Wells 46.70 

George T. Ames 19.86 

Mrs. Harry O'Neil, 54.30 

A. B. Conant 23.95 



$ 2,578.67 



Schedule 3 
Federal Grants 

Welfare Administration: 

Old age assistance $63.29 

Aid to dependent children 2.97 

Disability assistance 16.58 

Medical aid for aged persons 37.95 120.79 

Old age assistance 22,242.04 

Medical aid for aged persons 1,234.96 

Aid to dependent children 1,819.59 

Public Law 815 - School 819.68 

Public Law 874 - School 32,447.05 

$58,684.11 



112 



Schedule 4 
Unexpended Appropriation Balances 

Special Articles: 

Town 

Meeting Article Purpose Balance 
Date No. 

Civil Defense - gonset rigs $ 625.00 

Civil Defense - power unit 300.00 

Archives Committee 1,000.00 

Mount Hope Cemetery clearing 744.00 

Cemeteries layout 200.00 

Conservation Commission 200.00 

Woodlawn Cemetery 199.50 

Hydrant - Pope Road 1,000.00 
Auxiliary Fire Department - 

raincoats and boots 435.00 

Compilation of Town By-Laws 2,500.00 

Civil Defense - gonset rigs 475.00 

Assessors' map 3,356.06 

Police Station construction 46.33 

Sprinkler system - Towne School 2,564.23 

Desks and chairs - Towne School 5,000.00 

Sewerage Committee 35.25 

Accounting equipment 51.05 

Mount Hope Cemetery - oiling 429,94 

Flerra school land 1,000.00 

Revaluation 5,900.00 

High Street - new way 6,298.00 

Water District Study Committee 100.00 

Town Hall sprinkler system 5,273.63 

Sidewalks 2,500.00 

M.B.T.A. 1,750.00 

Downey property 6,200.00 

Cemetery Building Committee 395.80 

Auxiliary Fire Department 13.45 

Mount Hope Cemetery fence 22.00 

Dump body 2,200.00 

Stock pile top soil , 600.00 

Total Special Articles 

Constructions In Process: 
Chapter 90 

Julia McCarthy School Addition 
Elm Street Elementary School 
Library Addition 



6 


-24-57 




6 


-24-57 




3 


-10-58 


39 


3 


-9—59 


17 


3 


-14-60 


31 


12 


-12-60 


6 


3 


-12-62 


46 


3 


-12-62 


60 


3 


-12-62 


64 


3 


-11-63 


44 


3 


-11-63 


58 


1 


-20-64 


3 


3 


- 9-64 


14 


3 


- 9-64 


24 


3 


- 9-64 


25 


3 


- 9-64 


32 


6 


- 8-54 


3 


6 


- 8-54 


4 


IC 


»-19-54 


1 


3 


- 8-55 


9 


3 


- 8-55 


12 


3 


- 8-55 


17 


3 


- 8-65 


22 


3 


- 8-65 


25 


3 


- 8-65 


27 


3 


- 8-65 


28 


3 


- 8-65 


34 


3 


- 8-65 


38 


6 


- 7-65 


4 


11 


-15-65 


2 


11 


-15-65 


5 





51,524.24 


$ 52,500.00 




429.99 




702,878.07 




3.153.24 


758.971.30 



$810,495.54 



113 



Schedule 5 
Trust Accounts in Custody of Town Treasurer 

Charity Funds : 

Elizabeth M, White $ 28,511.28 

Georgia E. Whitney 14,529.70 

Betsy M. Ball 16,734.25 

Varnum Tuttle Memorial 12,526.33 

Cemetery Funds: 

Arietta Appleyard 2,015.00 

Henry S. Raymond - Monument 1,266.18 

Henry S. Raymond - Care 2,7 31.7 2 

Hoit and Scott 708.28 

J. Roland We the rbee 14,345.67 

Perpetual Care 131,817.09 

Luke Blanchard 2,816.51 

Frank C, Hayward 1,699.33 

Georgia E. Whitney 2,014.94 

Susan Noyes Hosmer 107,365.84 

Dr. Robert X. Davis 1,236.18 

Frank R. Knowlton 1,204.14 

George T. Ames 534.62 

Mrs. Harry O'Neil 404.37 

Sarah A. Watson 2,999/12 

Carrie F. Wells 3,707.60 

A. B. Conant Family 1,167.96 

Elbridge Jones Robbins and Descendants 1,053.54 

Library and Educational Funds : 

Acton High School 4,987.11 

Wilde Memorial 31,193.27 

Georgia E. Whitney Memorial 18,789.49 

Conservation Fund: $31,212.10 

Less - amount included in 

general fund cash 22,169.29 9,042.81 

Firemen's Relief Funds: 

Acton 13,240.92 

West Acton 1,223.67 

Stabilization Fund: 13,859.85 

$448,726.77 



114 




ASSESSORS 



Dewey E. Boatman, Chairman 
Carl C. Flint 
Carl R. Godfrey 

Board of Assessors 



Taxes Assessed as Follows: 
Buildings Exclusive of Land 
Land 
Personal 
Total Valuation 
Valuation - January 1, 1964 
Increase in Valuation 

Rate of Taxation - $92.00 per $1,000 
Real Estate 
Personal Estate 
Total Taxes Assessed 

Amount of Money Raised: 

State Parks and Reservations 

State Audit k Municipal Accounts 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 

County Tax 

Tuberculosis Hospital Grant 

Town Grant 

Overlay 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise: 

Number of Vehicles Assessed - 6127 
Commissioners Value of Motor Vehicles & Trailers 

Rate of Excise - $66.00 per $1,000 
Total Excise 
Added Excise of 1964 

Number of Vehicles - Added Excise - 411 
Value of Vehicles - Added Excise 
Recommitted Excise - 1963 
Number of Vehicles - Recommitted Excise - 2 



.15, 478, 825. 00 
1, 542, 805. 00 
1. 386. 428. 00 



1, 565, 989. 96 
127. 551. 37 



5. 131. 12 

1, 270. 01 

1, 039. 20 

45, 859. 60 

495. 74 

1, 587, 745. 66 

52, 000. 00 



$ 4, 680, 420. 00 

284, 883. 85 
5, 700. 23 

398, 010. 00 
115. 50 



$18, 408, 058. 00 

17. 207. 395. 00 

$ 1, 200, 663. 00 



$ 1, 693, 541. 33 



$ 1, 693, 541. 33 




IN MEMORIAM 

Albert P. Durkee 
March 30. 1885 - October 17, 1965 

Mr. Durkee served the Town of Acton faithfully for 43 years. He 
was a member of the Board of Assessors for 39 years and served as Chair- 
man for 30 years. He presided as Moderator at Town Meeting for 25 years, 
from 1933 to 1957. In March 1962, Mr. Durkee retired from public service 
leaving behind him a record of loyal and conscientious service which will 
long be remembered. 



115 



COLLECTOR 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1960 



Outstanding January 1, 1965 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 



Outstanding January 1, 1965 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 



Outstanding January 1, 1965 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 



Outstanding January 1, 1965 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 



Outstanding January 1, 1965 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 

Outstanding January 1, 1965 

Payments to Treasurer 
Transferred to Tax Titles 
Outstanding December 31, 1965 



Outstanding January 1, 1965 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 



Outstanding January 1, 1965 
Refunds 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Transferred to Tax Titles 

Transferred to Taxes in Litigation 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1961 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1962 



POLL TAXES - 1963 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1963 



REAL ESTATE TAXES - 1963 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1964 



REAL ESTATE TAXES - 1964 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1965 



Commitment per Warrants 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 





76. 00 

0. 





38. 00 






123. 00 




6. 00 

4. 00 

a 



76. 00 



76. 00 



38. 00 



38. 00 



123. 00 



123. 00 



10. 00 



10. 00 



91. 30 










91. 


30 






0, 


91. 30 
3, 587. 68 


3,392. 


63 




195. 


05 




1 


0, 


3, 587. 68 
5, 439. 50 


4, 957. 


90 




163. 


40 




318. 


20 


5, 439. 50 


35, 392. 


16 




2, 031. 


70 


37, 423. 86 


31, 850. 


56 




2, 012. 


40 




150. 


50 




34. 


40 




3.376. 
5 


00 


37, 423. 86 
127, 551. 37 


120, 796. 


27 




232. 


30 




6. 522. 


80 


127, 551. 37 



116 



104. 


35 


530. 


69 










543. 


76 


1, 


848. 


39 


2. 


086. 


53 



29, 


353. 


03 


3, 


311. 


05 


6. 


708. 


64 



MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE - 1965 



297, 


359. 


67 


8, 


787. 


28 


249, 


153. 


99 


26, 


129. 


62 


30, 


863. 


34 



FARM ANIMAL EXCISE - 1965 



1, 383. 
30. 


38 
20 


1, 150. 

177. 

84. 


92 
93 
73 


298. 
2. 


92 
41 


267. 
33. 


42 
91 



REAL ESTATE TAXES - 1965 

Commitment per Warrants $1, 565, 989. 96 

Refunds 8. 788. 91 $1,574,778.87 

Payments to Treasurer " 1, 488, 467. 47 

Abatements 45, 539. 08 

Transferred to Tax Titles 271. 40 

Transferred to Taxes in Litigation 36. 80 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 40, 464. 12 1, 574, 778. 87 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE - 1960 

Outstanding January 1, 1965 635.04 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 Q. 635. 04 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE - 1961 

Outstanding January 1,1965 656. 99 

Paynaents to Treasurer 203. 78 

Abatements 453. 21 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 656. 99 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE - 1962 

Outstanding January 1, 1965 879. 88 

Payments to Treasurer 56. 10 

Abatements 379. 50 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 444. 28 879. 88 



MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE - 1963 

Outstanding January 1, 1965 4, 363. 18 

Commitment per Warrant 115. 50 4, 478. 68 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 2. 086. 53 4, 478. 68 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE - 1964 

Outstanding January 1, 1965 31,688.50 

Commitment per Warrants 5, 700. 23 

Refunds 1. 983. 99 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 

Commitment per Warrants 
Refunds 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 

Commitment per Warrants 

Payments to Treasurer 

STREET BETTERMENTS ADDED TO TAXES - 1965 

Commitment per Warrants 

Refund Overpayment 30. 20 1, 413. 5f 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 84. 73 1. 413. 5^ 

COMMITTED INTEREST - 1965 

Commitment per Warrants 

Refund Overpayment 2. 41 301.33 

Payments to Treasurer 

Outstanding December 31, 1965 ~ 33. 91 301. 33 



39, 


372 


72 


39, 


372. 


72 


306, 


146. 


95 


306, 


146. 


95 




94. 


78 




94. 


78 



117 



INTEREST & COSTS ON TAXES - EXCISE - ASSESSMENTS 

Collections 1965 

Payments to Treasurer 

CERTIFICATES OF MUNICIPAL LIENS 

Collections 1965 

Payments to Treasurer 

TAXES IN LITIGATION 

Transferred to Taxes in Litigation 
Real Estate Taxes 1961 
Real Estate Taxes 1962 
Real Estate Taxes 1963 
Real Estate Taxes 1964 
Real Estate Taxes 1965 

Balance December 31, 1965 

APPORTIONED STREET ASSESSMENTS - NOT DUE 

Balance January 1, 1965 
Apportionments 

Payments to Treasurer in advance 
Added to Taxes 1965 
Outstanding December 31 
Due 1966 to 1984 inclusive 

Wm. Henry Soar 
Town Collector 



IS 




$ 


1, 
1, 


849. 82 
849. 82 

936. 00 
936. 00 


$ 

Ol 


23. 56 
25. 42 

33. 20 

34. 40 
36. 80 

^ DUE 






153. 38 
153. 38 




7, 650. 77 
117. 86 




7 


768. 63 




117. 86 
1, 265. 52 










6. 385. 25 




7 


768. 63 



TREASURER 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1965 

To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Cash Balance January 1, 1965 $ 533,351.82 

RECEIVED FROM STATE TREASURER 

Disability Assistance, Federal $ 443. 59 

Aid Dependent Children, Federal 9, 308. 48 

Old Age Assistance, Federal 19,561.74 

Medical Aid to Aged, Federal 22,977.07 

Disability Assistance 2, 097. 02 

Old Age Assistance 9, 290. 74 

Medical Aid to Aged 11,847.44 

Aid to Dependent Children 5, 806. 28 

Highway Chapter 90 1, 500. 00 

Public Library 1, 809. 50 

Snow Removal 987. 00 

Highway Chapter 81 15, 926. 94 

Corporation Taxes 71, 596. 53 

School Aid Chapter 70 139,906.39 

Meal Taxes 2, 820. 61 

State Taxes 26, 447. 34 

School Construction, McCarthy Addition 13,567.15 

School Construction, McCarthy 5, 567. 89 

School Construction, Merriam 20, 057. 63 

General Relief 19. 60 

Veterans Service 6, 486. 63 

Vocational Education 677. 63 

Vocational Transportation 152. 87 

Loss of Taxes 2, 380. 46 

School Construction, Elementary 75, 000. 00 

School Aid 69 k 71 4, 662. 75 

Abatements Disabled Veterans 1, 964. 40 

Transportation 25. 071. 64 $ 497. 935. 32 

118 



RECEIVED FROM COUNTY TREASURER 



Dog Licenses 
Highways - 1964 



1, 351. 80 
1, 500. 00 



2, 851. 80 



RECEIVED FROM TOWN COLLECTOR 



Poll Taxes : 1963 

Real Estate Taxes - 1963 ^ 

Personal Property Taxes - 1964 

Real Estate Taxes - 1964 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes - 1964 

Lien Certificates 

Blanchard Auditorium 

Interest & Charges 

Motor Vehicles Excise Taxes - 1962 

Motor Vehicles Excise Taxes - 1965 

Care Cemetery Lots 

Street Betterments 

Committed Interest 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes - 1963 

Farm Animal Excise Taxes - 1965 

Personal Property Taxes - 1965 

Real Estate Taxes - 1965 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes - 1961 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes - 1960 



Sporting License Fees 
Dog License Fees 
Certificates Vital 
Mortgage Fees 
Business Certificates 
Miscellaneous 
Dog Licenses 



Employee's - Payroll Deductions - 1965 
Federal Withholding 
State Withholding 
County Retirement 
Teacher's Retirement 
Blue Cross 
School Insurance 
Group Insurance 
Teacher's Association 

School Department 
Merriam School 
Blanchard Auditorium 
McCarthy School 
Miscellaneous 
Federal Grant P. L. 874 
Lunch Account 
Rental Reimbursement 

Board of Selectmen 
Miscellaneous 
Licenses 
Wiring Permits 
Building Permits 

Cemetery - Superintendent 
Miscellaneous 
Chapel Fees 
Sale of Lots 
Burials 

Chief of Police 
Pistol Permits 
Dealers Permits 
Bicycle Registrations 
Miscellaneous 

Chief of Fire Department 
Permits 

Rental of Stations 
Miscellaneous 



RECEIVED FROM TOWN CLERK 



MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS 



4. 00 

3, 392. 63 

4, 957. 90 
31, 850. 56 
29, 353. 03 

936. 00 

285. 00 

1, 849. 82 

56. 10 

249, 153. 99 

533. 00 

1, 150. 92 

267. 42 

543. 76 

94. 78 

120, 796. 27 

1, 488. 467. 47 

203. 78 

104. 35 



134. 45 
224. 00 
394. 00 
929. 00 
53. 50 
683. 00 
2, 056. 00 



98, 454. 25 

13, 215. 02 

15, 318. 10 

20, 976. 34 

8, 340. 74 

1, 422. 05 

863. 10 

1, 460. 00 

680. 00 

6, 927. 00 

30. 00 

170. 80 

18, 483. 00 

72, 522. 58 

5, 177. 42 

248. 25 

1, 042. 00 

2, 340. 60 

7, 124. 15 

505. 93 

125. 00 

750. 00 

1, 720. 00 

122. 00 

50. 00 

52. 25 

4. 00 

72. 50 

702. 00 

5. 00 



1, 934, 000. 78 



4, 473. 95 



160, 049. 60 



103, 990. 80 



10, 755. 00 



3, 100. 93 



228. 25 



779. 50 



119 



Board of Health 
Miscellaneous 
Sewerage Permits 
Nurse Services 
Gas Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
Clinics 

Miscellaneous Receipts 

Notar's Package Store License 

Village Package Store License 

Ella Campbell, Property Rental 

Machinery Account 

Employees - Retired, Group Insurance 

Employees - Retired, Blue Cross 

Employees - Group Insurance 

Employees - Blue Cross 

Board of Appeals, Hearings 

Recipients - Old Age Assistance 

Recipients - Medical Aid to Aged 

Recipients - Aid Dependent Children 

Recipients - Disability Assistance 

Recipients - General Relief 

Planning Board, Hearings 

Planning Board, Miscellaneous 

Harvard University, Sale of Dogs 

Concord District Court Fines 

West Acton Library Fines 

Memorial Library Fines 

Colonial Wine Shop License 

Mail Coach Restaurant License 

3rd District Court Fines 

Field &. Cowles, Fire Insurance 

Kemper Insurance, Insurance Claims 

George Hayward, Sealer Weights 

Estate Addle Baker, Appraisal Rec'y 

Harold McKenney, Tax Title 

Harold McKenney, Interest 

Fire Companies, Firemen's Relief Fund 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield, Earned Premium 

National Shawmut Bank, Note #451 

National Shawmut Bank, Accrued Interest 

Gallant Insurance, Boiler Insurance 

Watertown Federal Savings k Loan Association, Bond Forfeiture 

Plaza Restaurant License 

Sabato & Samuel DeMinzio License 

Board of Assessors, Sale Maps 

Acton Minutemen Inc., Building Lease 

Freedom Foundation Award 

Town of Concord, Land Taxes 

Roland O. Livermore, Rental - Hall 

Dog Officer, Sale of Dogs 

Thelma Hermes, West Acton Library 

White Weld Company, School Bonds 

White Weld Company, Premium 

White Weld Company, Accrued Interest 

The Paint Pot, Recreation 

Union National Bank, Note #452 

Highway Department, Truck Body 

Highway Department, Traffic Signs 



240. 50 
985. 00 
710. 50 

1, 622. 50 

2, 556. 50 

93. 80 



1, 


500. 00 


1, 


500. 00 




720. 00 


2, 


745. 90 




47. 74 




587. 82 




2. 80 




14. 20 




80. 00 


7, 


765. 94 




30. 00 




70. 00 




300. 00 




450. 00 




325. 00 




7. 50 




15. 00 




648. 41 




103. 94 


2, 


121. 17 


1, 


500.00 


2, 


100. 00 




5. 00 




272. 00 


1, 


489. 42 




348. 00 




50. 00 




385. 20 




15. 60 




280. 00 


2, 


363. 00 


400, 


000. 00 




303.33 




18. 00 




495. 88 




375. 00 




850. 00 




84. 75 




4. 00 




100. 00 




182. 13 




10. 00 




24. 00 




71. 44 


725, 


000. 00 


5, 


391. 50 


1, 


198. 30 




19. 54 


23, 


350. 00 




50. 00 




19. 50 



PERPETUAL CARE - WOODLAWN CEMETERY 



Mrs. Douglas McGregor 

Mary E. Kemp 

Estate Henry Onnard 

Rose L. Snyer 

Allen & Anne Christofferson 

Grace M. Jones 

David E. Young 

Janis Banquer 

Harlan &. Gertrude Tuttle 

Ernest A. Magoon 

Ole & Evelyn Garthe 

Jennie E. Reed 



150. 00 
100. 00 
200. 00 
100. 00 
150. 00 
200. 00 
300. 00 
200. 00 
200. 00 
200. 00 
100. 00 
150. 00 



6, 208. 80 



;l, 185, 391. 01 



120 



PERPETUAL CARE - WOODLAWN CEMETERY (CONT'D.) 



Carlson k Smith 
Mildred L. Berry 
Ernest E. Nelson, Jr. 



Harold Merry 
Bennett &. Murdough 
Lester A. Sebastian 



Arlette Appleyard Cemetery Fund 

Cemetery Fund 

A. B. Conant Cemetery Fund 

Dr. Robert Davis Cemetery Fund 

Elbridge Robbins Cemetery Fund 

Elizabeth White Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Cemetery Fund 

Hoit &c Scott Cemetery Fund 

Mrs. Harry O'Neil Cemetery Fund 

Frank Knowlton Cemetery Fund 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 

Henry S. Raymond Cemetery Fund 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 

J. Roland Wetherbee Cemetery Fund 

Acton Memorial Library Fund 

Sarah Watson Fund 

Carrie Wells Cemetery Fund 

Stabilization Fund 



Acton High School Library Fund 

Acton Firemens Relief Fund 

George T. Ames Cemetery Fund 

Arlette Appleyard Cemetery Fund 

Betsey M. Ball Fund 

Cemetery Fund 

A. B. Conant Cemetery Fund 

Conservation Investment Fund 

Dr. Robert Davis Cemetery Fund 

Elbridge J. Robbins Descendents Fund 

Elizabeth White Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Memorial Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Cemetery Fund 

Frank C. Hayward Cemetery Fund 

Hoit k Scott Cemetery Fund 

Mrs. Harry O'Neil Cemetery Fund 

Frank R. Knowlton Cemetery Fund 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 

Henry S. Raymond Monument Fund 

Henry S. Raymond Cemetery Fund 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Cemetery Fund 

Varnum Tuttle Memorial Fund 

J. Roland Wetherbee Cemetery Fund 

Acton Memorial Library Fund 

Sarah A. Watson Cemetery Fund 

Carrie F. Wells Cemetery Fund 

Acton Memorial Library, Tainter Fund 

Stabilization Fund 

Total Receipts for the Year 1965 
Cash Balance January 1, 1965 

Paid Selectmen's Order for 1965 
Cash Balance December 31, 1965 

Cash 

General Funds 

Investments - Certificate of Deposits 



200. 00 
200. 00 
100. 00 



PERPETUAL CARE - MT. HOPE CEMETERY 



100. 00 
100. 00 
200. 00 



TRANSFERS TO TOWN ACCOUNT 



TRUST FUND INCOME 



30. 00 

1, 500. 00 

25. 00 
20. 00 
15. 00 
800. 00 
525. 00 
50. 00 
25. 00 
50. 00 
50. 00 
35. 00 
50. 00 

2, 500. 00 
100. 00 

1, 118. 06 

100. 00 

50. 00 

107. 000. 00 



174. 38 

360. 15 
19. 18 
45. 00 

428. 04 

4, 151. 31 

45. 00 

857. 56 

43. 74 

45. 00 

1, 081. 30 

675. 00 

605. 78 
63. 76 
45. 00 
22. 50 
15. 34 
42. 49 

101. 51 
28. 00 

114. 35 

3, 512. 00 
450. 00 
421. 88 
899. 93 
100. 00 
131. 26 
493. 24 

4, 260. 60 



2, 550. 00 



400. 00 



114, 043. 06 



19, 233. 30 

$4, 045, 992. 10 
533. 351. 82 



$4, 
3, 


579, 
378, 


343. 
947. 


92 
10 


$1, 


200, 


396. 


82 


$ 


400, 
800, 


396. 
000. 


82 
00 


u. 


200, 


396. 


82 



121 



OUTSTANDING NOTES AND BONDS 



Year 


Schools 


1966 


$ 105, 000 


1967 


105, 000 


1968 


95, 000 


1969 


95, 000 


1970 


95, 000 


1971 


85, 000 


1972 


85, 000 


1973 


75, 000 


1974 


75, 000 


1975 


75, 000 


1976 


75, 000 


1977 


75, 000 


1978 


35, 000 


1979 


35, 000 


1980 


35, 000 


1981 


35, 000 


1982 


35, 000 


1983 


35, 000 


1984 


35, 000 


1985 


35, 000 




$1. 320, 000 



Police 
Station 

$20, 000 
20, 000 
20, 000 
20, 000 



Fire 
Station 

$12, 000 



Highways 



Total 



$80, 000 



$12, 000 



1964 



Loans authorized not issued. Library Addition 



$23, 350 


$ 


160, 350 
125, 000 
115. 000 
115, 000 
95, 000 
85, 000 
85, 000 
75, 000 
75, 000 
75, 000 
75, 000 
75, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 


$23, 350 


$1 


435, 350 




$ 


200, 000 



ACTON HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 
Received to Fund in 1965 
Contributions 
Interest 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Received Interest for 1965 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



000. 00 
781. 24 



ACTON FIREMENS RELIEF FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



4, 



185. 00 
237. 91 



280. 00 

538. 01 



GEORGE T. AMES CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



465. 49 
48. 17 



ARLETTE APPLEYARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



$ 


4, 


781. 
205. 


24 
87 


$ 
1_ 


4, 
4, 


987. 
987, 


11 
11 



$ 12, 422. 91 



818. 01 
13, 240. 92 

13, 240. 92 



513, 66 

20. 96 

534. 62 

534. 62 



$ 2, 000. 00 

45. 00 

$ 2, 045. 00 

30. 00 

$ 2,015.00 
$ 2, 045. 00 



122 



BETSEY M. BALL FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received for Perpetual Care 
Received Interest for 1965 

Cash on Hand 

Transfers to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received to Fund Article 19 
Received Interest for 1965 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



$ 10, 095. 26 
5, 971. 40 



CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



95, 697. 21 
29, 458. 03 



2, 
5, 


950. 
343. 


00 
52 


1, 


131. 
500. 


67 
00 



A. B. CONANT CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



1, 000. 00 
142. 08 



CONSERVATION INVESTMENT FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



$ 21, 439. 43 
297. 12 

8, 602. 30 
873. 25 



DR. ROBERT I. DAVIS CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



1, 000. 00 
203. 30 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 



ELBRIDGE JONES ROBBINS k DESCENDENTS FUND 

Balance January 1, 1965 

$ 1,000.00 
22. 50 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



16, 066. 66 

667. 59 

16, 734. 25 

16. 734. 25 



$125, 155. 24 



8. 293. 52 
$133, 448. 76 



1, 631. 67 

131. 817. 09 

$133, 448, 76 



1, 142. 08 
50. 88 



$ 


1, 

1, 


192. 

25. 

167 


96 

00 
96 


l_ 


1, 


192. 


96 



21, 736. 55 

9. 475. 55 
31, 212. 10 

31, 212. 10 



$ 1,203.30 

52. 88 

$ 1, 256. 18 

20. 00 

1. 236. 18 

$ 1. 256. 18 



$ 1,022.50 

46. 04 

$ 1, 068. 54 

15. 00 

1. 053. 54 

$ 1, 068. 54 



123 



ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1965 
On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1965 
On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

IncQfne Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



$ 25, 000. 00 
3, 122. 01 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY MEMORIAL FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



$ 15, 000. 00 
2, 991. 45 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



$ 14, 073. 70 
357. 91 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



1, 500. 00 
481. 48 



FRANK C. HAYWARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



1, 000. 00 
628. 81 



HOIT & SCOTT CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



500. 00 
202. 54 



MRS. HARRY O'NEIL'S CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



372. 39 
64. 17 



$ 


28, 

1, 


122. 
189. 


01 
27 


$ 


29, 
28, 


311. 

800. 
511. 


28 

00 
28 


1 


29, 


311. 


28 



17, 991. 45 
798. 04 

18, 789. 49 

18. 789. 49 



$ 14, 431. 61 

623. 09 

$ 15, 054. 70 

525. 00 , 
$ 14. 529. 70 
$ 15, 054. 70 



1, 981. 48 
83. 46 



$ 


2, 
2, 


064. 

50. 
014. 


94 

00 
94 


1_ 


2, 


064. 


94 



1, 628. 81 

70. 52 

1. 699. 33 

1. 699. 33 



702. 54 

30. 74 

733. 28 

25. 00 
708. 28 
733. 28 



436. 56 
17. 81 

454. 37 
50. 00 

404. 37 

454. 37 



124 



FRANK R. KNOWLTON CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



1, 000. 00 
202. 61 



LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



2, 419. 24 
317. 77 



HENRY S. RAYMOND FUND 
MONUMENT PERPETUAL CARE 

Balance January 1, 1965 



700. 00 
516. 93 



HENRY S. RAYMOND CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



2. 000. 00 
667. 37 



SUSAN NOYES HOSMER CEMETERY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1965 

$ 82. 238. 95 
23, 135. 54 



VARNUM TUTTLE MEMORIAL FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



$ 10, 000. 00 
1. 994. 31 



$ 1,202.61 

51. 53 

$ 1, 254. 14 

50. 00 

1. 204. 14 

$ 1, 254. 14 



$ 2,737.01 

114. 50 

$ 2,851.51 

35. 00 
$ 2,816.51 
$ 2.851.51 



1, 216. 93 

49. 25 

1, 266. 18 

1, 266. 18 



$ 2, 667. 37 

114. 35 

$ 2,781.72 

50. 00 

2, 731. 72 

$ 2.781.72 



$105, 374. 49 

4. 491. 35 

$109, 865. 84 

2, 500. 00 

107. 365. 84 

$109, 865. 84 



11, 994. 31 
532. 02 

12. 526. 33 

12, 526. 33 



125 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



J. ROLAND WETHERBEE CEMETERY FUND 

Balance January 1, 1965 

$ 10, 000. 00 
3, 867. 87 



ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



$ 32, 890. 21 
2, 907. 84 



$ 13, 867. 87 
577. 80 



$ 


14. 
14, 


445. 

100. 
345. 


67 

00 
67 


l_ 


14, 


445. 


67 



$ 35, 798. 05 

1, 513. 28 

$ 37, 311. 33 

1, 118. 06 

36, 193. 27 

$ 37, 311. 33 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



SARAH A. WATSON CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



2, 500. 00 
478. 70 



$ 2,978.70 

120. 42 

$ 3, 099. 12 

100. 00 

2, 999. 12 

$ 3, 099. 12 



Principal Fund 

Received Interest for 1965 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



1, 174. 75 
48. 92 



1, 223. 67 
1, 223. 67 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfers to Town Account 
On Deposit December 31, 1965 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1965 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1965 



STABILIZATION FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



$106, 515. 19 
9, 631. 05 



CARRIE F. WELLS CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1965 



3, 000. 00 
602. 91 



$116, 146. 24 

4. 713. 61 

$120, 859. 85 

$107, 000. 00 

13. 859. 85 

$120. 859. 85 



$ 3,602.91 

154. 69 

$ 3, 757. 60 

50. 00 

3, 707. 60 

$ 3, 757. 60 



Wm. Henry Soar 
Town Treasurer 



126 



STATE AUDITOR 



To the Board of Selectmen 
Mr. Warren F. Birch, Chairman 
Acton, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the books and accounts of the Town of Acton for the fiscal year 
1964, made in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. This is in the form of a report 
made to me by Mr. William Schwartz, Assistant Chief of Bureau. 

Very truly yours, 

ARTHUR H. MacKINNON 
Director of Accounts 

Mr. Arthur H. MacKinnon 

Director of Accounts 

Department of Corporations and Taxation 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Sir: 

In accordance with your instructions, I have made an audit of the books and accounts of the Town of Acton 
for the fiscal year 1964, and submit the following report thereon: 

The financial transactions, as recorded on the books of the several departments receiving or disbursing 
money for the town or committing bills for collection, were examined, checked and compared with the records 
of the town accountant and the town treasurer. 

The books and accounts of the town accountant were examined and checked. The receipts as recorded 
were checked with the available departmental records and with the treasurer's books, while the payments were 
compared with the selectmen's warrants and the treasurer's records. 

The appropriations, loan authorizations, and transfers were checked with the amounts voted by the town 
as shown by the town clerk's record of town meetings, the transfers from the reserve fund were compared with 
the amounts authorized by the finance committee, while other entries were checked with the records in the vari- 
ous departments in which the transactions originated. 

The ledgers were analyzed, a trial balance was taken off proving the accounts to be in balance, and a bal- 
ance sheet, which is appended to this report, was prepared showing the financial condition of the town as of 
December 31, 1964. 

The books and records of the town treasurer were examined and checked. The cash book footings were 
verified, and the recorded receipts were analyzed and compared with the town accountant's books, with the 
records of the several departments collecting money for the town, and with other sources from which money is 
paid into the town treasury. The payments were checked with the selectmen's warrants and with the accountant's 
records. The cash balance on March 16, 1965 was proved by reconciliation of the bank balances with statements 
furnished by the banks of deposit, by verification of the deposits in transit, and by examination of the savings 
bank books. 

The recorded payments on account of maturing debt and interest were verified by comparison with the 
amounts falling due and were checked with the cancelled coupons and securities in the office. The outstanding 
coupons on March 16, 1965'were listed and reconciled with a statement furnished by the depository. 

The savings bank books and securities representing the investments of the several trust and investment 
funds in the custody of the town treasurer and the trustees of the Charlotte L. Goodnow Fund were examined and 
listed. The income was proved, the transfers to the town were verified, and all transactions and balances were 
checked with the records of the town treasurer and the town accountant. 

The records of payroll deductions on account of Federal and State taxes, the county and teachers' retire- 
ment systems. Blue Cross and Blue Shield, and group insurance were examined and checked. The payments to 
the respective agencies were verified and the balances as shown on the employees' records were listed and 
reconciled with the accountant's ledger controls. 

The records of tax titles and tax possessions held by the town were examined, listed, and proved with the 
town accountant's ledger. The taxes transferred to the tax title account were checked with the collector's books 
and the reported redemptions of tax titles were compared with the treasurer's recorded receipts. 

The books and accounts of the tax collector were examined and checked. The taxes, excise, and assess- 
ments, outstanding at the time of the previous audit, as well as all subsequent commitment lists, were checked 

127 



and proved. The recorded collections were compared with the payments to the treasurer, the recorded abate- 
ments were checked with the assessors' records of abatements granted, and the outstanding accounts were listei 
and reconciled with the proper controlling accounts in the town accountant's ledger. 

Further verification of the outstanding accounts was made by mailing notices to a number of persons whosi 
names appeared on the books as owing money to the town, the replies received thereto indicating that the accoun 
as listed, are correct. 

The financial records of the town clerk were examined. The records of receipts on account of dog and 
sporting licenses, and from miscellaneous charges and fees were checked. The payments to the State and to the 
town were checked with the receipts on file and with the town treasurer's books, and the cash on hand March 16, 
1965 was verified. 

The surety bonds of the town officials required by law to furnish such surety were examined and found to 
be in proper form. 

The records of departmental cash collections of the board of selectmen and the sealer of weights and mea- 
sures, as well as of the police, fire, health, school, library, and cemetery departments, and of all other depar 
ments in which money was collected for the town, were examined and checked. The recorded receipts were 
verified, and the payments to the treasurer were compared with the records of the town treasurer and the town 
accountant. 

In addition to the balance sheet, there are appended to this report tables showing a reconciliation of the 
treasurer's cash, summaries of the tax, excise, assessment, tax title, tax possession, and departmental 
accounts, together with schedules showing the condition and transactions of the trust and investment funds. 

During the progress of the audit cooperation was received from all town officials, for which, on behalf of 
my assistants and for myself, I wish to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM SCHWARTZ 
Assistant Chief of Bureau 



TOWN OF ACTON 
Balance Sheet - December 31, 1964 

GENERAL ACCOUNTS 



Assets 



Liabilities and Reserves 



Cash: 

General, 

Advances for Petty: 
Tax Collector, 
School General, 



Accounts Receivable: 
Taxes: 
Levy of I960: 

Personal Property, 
Levy of 1961: 

Personal Property, 
Levy of 1962: 

Personal Property, 
Levy of 1963: 

Poll, 

Personal Property, 

Real Estate, 
Levy of 1964: 

Personal Property, 

Real Estate, 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Levy of 1960, 
Levy of 1961, 
Levy of 1962, 
Levy of 1963, 
Levy of 1964, 



Temporary Loans: 







$555,088.37 


In Anticipation of 
Reimbursement, 


$50 


00 




Payroll Deductions: 


20 


00 




Federal Taxes, 






70.00 


State Taxes, 
County Retirement 

System, 
Blue Cross and Blue 

Shield, 


$76 


00 




Group Insurance, 



$41,075.00 



$76.00 








Group Insurance, 


38.00 








Guarantee Deposits: 


123.00 








Planning Board, 
Board of Appeals, 


10.00 








Construction, 


91.30 










3,587.68 








Agency: 


5,439.50 








Dog Licenses -Due County, 


35,392.16 












44, 


757 


64 


Tailings: 


xcise: 








Unclaimed Checks, 


635.04 










656.99 








Trust Fund Income: 


879.88 








Cemeteries, 


4,363.18 










31,688.50 








Premium on Loans: 




38 


223 


59 


Police Station Construction 



$9,316.10 
1,202.92 

1,463.85 

859.07 
86.78 



$42.75 
13.50 

81.94 



12,928.72 

138.19 

105.25 

279.76 

1,283.08 

90.00 



Taxes In Litigation, 



82.18 



128 



GENERAL ACCOUNTS (CONT'D.) 



Tax Titles and Possessions: 
Tax Titles, $919.84 

Tax Possessions, 305.80 



Departmental: 
Collector, $88.50 

Planning Board, 50.00 

Highway, 891.64 

Aid to Dependent Children, 1,714.20 



Veterans' Services 

School, 

Cemetery, 



Aid to Highways: 
State, 
C ounty. 



Loans Authorized: 
School Construction, 
Library Addition, 



3,253.46 
436.61 
100.00 



$34,993.74 
15,300.00 



$800,000.00 
200,000.00 



Due from Stabilization Fund: 
School Construction, $75,000.00 

Fire Ladder Truck, 32,000.00 



Underestimate 1964: 
County Tax, 



$1,225.64 



6,534.41 

50,293.74 

1,000,000.00 

107,000.00 
1,451.54 



Federal Grants: 
Disability Assistance: 

Administration, 

Assistance, 
Aid to Dependent Children; 

Administration, 

Aid, 
Old Age Assistance: 

Administration, 

Assistance, 
Medical Assistance for 

the Aged: 

Administration, 

Assistance, 
School: 

Public Law #81-815, 

Public Law #81-874, 



Revolving Fund: 
School Lunch, 

Appropriation Balances: 
Revenue: 

General, 
Non-Revenue: 
Police Station 
Construction, 
School Construction, 



$16.33 
676.07 

109.07 
5,921.52 

20.40 
21,272.68 



38.79 
4,433.01 

819.68 
39,165.15 



$137,409.41 



46,857.65 
429.99 



Appropriations From Stabilization 
Fund, 

Loans Authorized and Unissued, 

Conservation Fund, 

Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund, 

Overestimate 1964: 
State Recreation Areas 
Assessment, 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriation: 
Library $1,809.50 

Road Machinery Fund, 6,119.64 

Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus, 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 
Levy of 1960, $76.00 

Levy of 1961, 38.00 

Levy of 1962, 123.00 

Levy of 1963, 3,688.98 

Levy of 1964, 8,161.54 



Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 
Motor Vehicle and Trailer 

Excise, $38,223.59 

Special Tax, 82.18 

Tax Title and Possession, 1,225.64 
Departmental, 6,534.41 

Aid to Highway, 9,218.74 



Reserve for Petty Cash Advances, 
Surplus Revenue, 



$72,472.70 
12,278.52 



184,697.05 

107,000.00 

;i, 000, 000. 00 

21,439.43 

6,180.35 

355.67 

7,929.14 

17,419.71 



12,087.52 



$1,804,727.11 



55,284.56 

70.00 

251,612.46 
$1,804,727.11 



129 



Apportioned Street Assessments 
Not Due, 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 
Inside Debt Limit: 
General, 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
$7,650.77 



Apportioned Street Assessment 
Revenue: 
Due in 1965 to 1984, 
Inclusive, 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Outside Debt Limit: 
General, 



$359,000.00 



470.000.00 



$829,000.00 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 



Serial Loans: 
Inside Debt Limit: 
School, 
School Land 

Acquisition, 
Municipal Buildings, 



Outside Debt Limit: 
School, 



Trust and Investment Funds: 
Cash and Securities: 
In Custody of Treasurer, 

In Custody of Trustees, 



$528,363.29 
3,465.54 



In Custody of Treasurer: 

Welfare Funds: 
Betsy M. Ball, 
Elizabeth White, 
George E. Whitney, 
Varnum Tuttle 
Memorial, 

School Funds: 
Charlotte Conant, 
George E. Whitney 
Memorial, 

Library Funds: 
Wilde Memorial, 

Acton Firemen's Relief 
Fund, 

West Acton Firemen's 
Relief Fund, 

Cemetery Funds: 
Perpetual Care, 
Arlette Appleyard, 
Hoit and Scott, 
J. Roland Wetherbee, 
Georgia E. Whitney, 
Luke Blanchard, 
Frank C. Hayward, 
Susan Noyes Hosmer, 
Henry L. Raymond 

Monument, 
Henry L. Raymond 

Care, 
Dr. Robert I. Davis, 
Frank R. Knowlton, 
George T. Ames, 
Mrs. Harry O'Neil, 
Sarah A. Watson, 
Carrie F. Wells, 
A.B. Conant Family, 
Elbridge, Jones, 
Robbins and 
Descendents, 

Investment Fund: 
Stabilization, 



$195,000.00 

40,000.00 
124,000.00 



$16,066.66 
28,122.01 
14,431.61 

11,994.31 

4,781.24 

17,991.45 

35,798.05 

12,422.91 

1,174.75 

125,155.24 

2,000.00 

702.54 

13,867.87 

1,981.48 

2,737.01 

1,628.81 

105,374.49 

1,216.93 

2,667.37 
1,203.30 
1,202.61 
513.66 
436.56 
2,978.70 
3,602.91 
1,142.08 

1,022.50 

116,146.24 



In Custody of Trustees: 
Charlotte L. Goodnow Fund, 



$7,650.77 



$359,000.00 

470,000.00 
829,000,00 



$531,828.83 



528,363.29 



3.465.54 



$531,828.83 



130 



TOWN OFFICERS and APPOINTMENTS 



MODERATOR 

John W. Putnam 



SELECTMEN 



John H. Loring 
Warren F. Birch 
Mary K. Hadley 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



TOWN CLERK 
Charles M. MacRae 

TREASURER and COLLECTOR 
Wm. Henry Soar 



ASSESSORS 



Carl R. Godfrey 
Carl C. Flint 
Dewey E. Boatman 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



TREE WARDEN 
Franklin H. Charter 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 



Lossie E. Laird 
Patience H. MacPherson 
Clinton S. Curtis 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Harlan E. Tuttle 
Howard F. Jones 
Donald O. Nylander 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



CONSTABLES 



Edward J. Collins, Jr. 
Chauncey R. Fenton, Jr. 



T. Frederick S. Kennedy 
David W. Scribner 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



Richard A. Bodge 
Doris E. Peterson 
^Louise M. Gardiner 
* Margaret Richter 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



LOCAL AND REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEES 



M. Virginia Biggy 
Albert W. Koch 
George E. Neagle 
Edwin Richter 
Parker Harrison, Jr. 
Thomas E. Wetherbee 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 
Term Expires 1968 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



J. Huston Westover 
Jay S. Grumbling 
George W. Moulton 
Marcia Jean Harris 
John T. Albright 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 



Term Expires 1968 



PLANNING BOARD 



Charles E. Orcutt, Jr. 
Ellen C. Bryant 
David P. Tinker 
Charles D. O'Neal, Jr. 
Beatrice C. Perkins 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 
Term Expires 1969 
Term Expires 1970 



* Resigned 



Replacing 



TRUSTEES OF ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 



Eleanor P. Wilson 
Helen B. Wood 
Hazel P. Vose 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



TRUSTEES OF WEST ACTON 
FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 



H. Stuart MacGregor 
James B. Wilson 
Arno H. Perkins 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



TRUSTEES OF ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 



Clarence A. Frost 

Lloyd W. Priest 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



TRUSTEES OF GOODNOW FUND 



Clark C. McElvein 
Thelma L. Boatman 
James N. Gates 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITIZENS LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION OF WEST ACTON 



Percival W. Wood 
Barbara Nylander 
Edward F. Boyden 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN - 1965 

EXECUTIVE CLERK 
Virginia Milbery 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Joseph R. O'Neill 
William L. Chipman 

''Samuel L. Davis 

■'Roger Crafts 
Frederick H. Bubier 
John A. Norris 
Paul H. Lesure 
Porter G. Jenks 
Charles C. Grandy 
William B. Allred 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1966 

Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 
Term Expires 1968 
Term Expires 1968 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



William C. Sawyer 
Hayward S. Houghton 
Herschel N. Hadley 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



ASSOCIATES 



Harold W. 
Milford B. 



Flood 
Bottomley 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 
Allen H. Nelson 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 



''Grace J. Cullinane 
''Julia A. Barry 
T. Leo McCarthy 
James B. Wilson 
Charles M. MacRae 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 

Term Expires 1968 
Ex-Officio 



131 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Robert J. Erickson Term Expires 1968 

CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT 
(Permanent) 

H. Stuart MacGregor 
TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 



Franklin H. Charter 
Arno H. Perkins 
Emery D. Nelson 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



ELECTION OFFICERS 



Precinct I 



Warden 
Clerk 
Inspectors 
Deputy Warden 
Deputy Clerk 
Deputy Inspectors 



Irene F. 



Tellers 



McLaughlin 

Inga Frost 

Alice H. May, Margaret Schene 

John F. McLaughlin 

Helen R. Edwards 

Adelaide G. Cornwall, 

Muriel F. Miller 

Edna R. Custance, Frances L. Collins, 

Marion F. Driscoll, Frances Hirsch, 

Mona V. Melymuka, Olga Andersen 



Warden 

Clerk 

Inspectors 

Deputy Warden 

Deputy Clerk 

Deputy Inspectors 

Tellers 



Precinct II 

Margaret Larsen 
Bertha Carr Tucker 
Martha I. Lowden, Sophia Walsh 
Ellen G. Beck 
Phyllis M. Moyer 
-Hazel P. Vose, Michael J. Walsh 
Elsie T. Winslow, Nancy Nastasi, 
Ruth R. Phelps, Helen M. Young, 
Margaret I. Cullinane, Irene Young 

Precinct III 

Warden Barbara J. McPhee 

Clerk Phyllis K. Sprague 

Inspectors Barbara Nylander, Martin J. Duggan 

Deputy Warden Katherine E. Nedza 

Deputy Clerk Stanley A. Nedza 

Deputy Inspectors Elsie M. Godfrey, 

Genevieve L. Hatch 

Tellers Minnie C. Veasie, Elizabeth H. Gray, 

Mary H. Prentice, Esther Perry, 

Anna G. Mahar, Lydia R. Lesure 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS - DOG OFFICER 

Carl W. Flint 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
George K. Hayward 

RECREATION COMMISSION 



Charles W. Pappas 
Martin C. Scanlan 
Gladys K. Mason 
*Helen E. Moland 
William J. Phillips 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 
Term Expires 1969 
Term Expires 1969 



INSPECTOR, GAS PIPING and GAS APPLIANCES 
Joseph G. Perry 

DEPUTY INSPECTOR, GAS PIPING 
and GAS APPLIANCES 

Edward F. Wright 

*Resigned; ***Civil Service; x Deceased. 

132 



FENCE VIEWER 
Allan R. Murray 



FIELD DRIVERS 



William C. Kazokas 
William J. Durkin, Jr. 



Robert S. Rhodes 
Norman L. Roche 



SUPERINTENDENT OF MOTH WORK 
Franklin H. Charter 

BURIAL AGENT -- VETERAN'S AGENT 
Norman L. Roche 

VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 

INSPECTOR OF WIRES 
Leslie F. Parke 

DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF WIRES 
Lawrence I. Tucker 

POLICE OFFICERS 

***Edward J. Collins, Jr., Chief 

***Chauncey R. Fenton, Jr., Sergeant 

***David W. Scribner, Sergeant 



* * -f 



William J. Durkin, Jr. 
Norman L. Roche 
Robert A. Bartlett 
John V. Gregory 
Robert S. Rhodes 
Robert P. MacLeod 
Bernard W. Harrison 
William N. Hayes 

Carl W 



''=**Joseph P. Sansone 

Franklin H. Charter 

Ray L. Harris 

William S. Kendall, Jr. 

Richard N. Farrell 

James P. Conheeney, Jr. 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy 

Allen H. Nelson 

. Flint 



KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 
Edward J. Collins, Jr. 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION AGENT 
Theron A. Lowden 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
John F. McLaughlin 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Robert F. Guba 

PUBLIC WEIGHERS 



William Braman 
xG. Howard Reed 
Charles F. Greenough 
Harold E. Whitney 



Robert M. Greenough 

Arthur P. Genetti 

Alan C. Wagner 

Paul M. Wagner, Jr. 



TOWN COUNSEL 
Francis C. Newton, Jr. 

TOWN ENGINEER 
* John J. Dowd 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Kenneth E. Jewell 

DEPUTY BUILDING INSPECTOR 
H. Stuart MacGregor 



Joyce C 
David L. May 
T. Frederick S 



ARCHIVES COMMITTEE 
Woodhead Term Expires 1966 



Term Expires 1967 
Kennedy Term Expires 1968 



TOWN REPORT COMMITTEE 



James L. Parker 
Beverly W. Lydiard 
Gillette H. Noble 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



William H. Kemp 
Clyde J. Horne 
Donald L. Loring 
Lyman H. Goff, Jr. 
Wilbur J. Tolman 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 
Term Expires 1968 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 



Allen M. Christofferson 
Paul M. McPherson 
Richard J. O'Neil 
Frederick H. Bubier 
Ralph C. Morse 
Stephen E. Lord 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 
Term Expires 1969 
Term Expires 1970 



PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Term Expires 1966 



■'Lloyd W. Priest 
''Norman Mcintosh 
Joseph S. Cobb 
Frank L. Arms 
Arnold H. Mercier 



Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 
Term Expires 1969 



PUBLIC CEREMONIES AND 
CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 



Carl A. Hedin 
Percival W. Wood 
Russell Hayward 
Raymond A. Shamel 
Seymour A. DiMare 
Edward C. Warren 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1968 
Term Expires 1968 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



David P. Tinker 
Alice H. May 
John A. Jeffries, Jr. 
William L. Kingman 
Kenneth E. Jewell 
■'Richard H. Murphy 
Robert J. Ellis 
Chauncey W. Waldron, Jr. 



Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1966 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1967 
Term Expires 1967 

Term Expires 1968 
Term Expires 1968 



STREET LIGHTING COMMITTEE 

Byrd D. Goss Joseph F. Bushell 

Leslie F. Parke 



'■'Resigned 



'Replacing 



TOWN EMPLOYEES INSURANCE 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



David W. Scribner 
Stewart K&nnedy 

Carolyn Douglas 



Arno H. Perkins 
Viola M. Foley 



TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
Philip G. Watts Allen G. Moody 



BYLAW COMMITTEE 



Joan R. Gates 
Minetta D. Lee 
Gladys S. Wootton 



Lillian C. Hoey 

Carole S. Hill 

Edith D. Stowell 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY TRANSFER OF THE 
ACTON WATER DISTRICT TO THE TOWN OF ACTON 



Donald L. Loring 
Louis A. Flerra 



E. Stevens Hamilton 
John L. Maes 



Dana B. Hinckley 
WATER RESOURCES COMMITTEE 



J. Hustou'Westover 
Edwin H. Christofferson 
Charles D. O'Neal, Jr. 



T. Frederick S. Kennedy 

Hubert R. Durling, Jr. 

William J. Phillips 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR 
HISTORIC PRESERVATION 



Howard P. Hardin 
Julian J. D'Agostine, Jr. 
Robert H. Nylander 



Marion P. Hartshorn 

Mary M. Maes 

William C. Sawyer 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY HOUSING FOR THE AGED 

John E. Dunphy, Jr. Agnes E. Johnson 

Edward J. Bursaw Eileen F. Hale 

Patience H. MacPherson 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY MODERATOR 

COMMITTEE ON TOWN ADMINISTRATION 

Charles D. MacPherson Beatrice C. Perkins 

Chester H. Moody Charles C. Grandy 

Clyde J. Horne 

SIDEWALK STUDY COMMITTEE 



Margaret M. Coughlan 
John E. Dunphy, Jr. 



Irene M. Rhodes 
Francis J. Schell 



OTHER APPOINTMENTS 
SEWERAGE STUDY COMMITTEE 



Paul R. Nyquist 
Robert J. Ellis 



Hubert R. Durling, Jr. 
James S. Winston 



Edward N. Patrick 



133 



JURY LIST 



PRECINCT 1 

Carl A. Peterson, 4 Brabrook Road, Mechanical Engineer 

Fletcher W. Burger, 107 Concord Road, Manager 

John R. Vieira, Jr. , 4 Flagg Road, Electronic Technician 

John B. Milliken, 12 Hosmer Street, Purchasing Agent 

William R. Horton, 514 Main Street, Junior Engineer 

David W. Forrant, 97 Newtown Road, Electronic Engineer 

Robert E. Clapp, 4" Wheeler Lane, Salesman 

Malcolm R. Dunn, 62 Taylor Road, Farmer 

James R. Mercer, Jr. , 562 Main Street, President 

Paul C. Crosse, 11 Alcott Street, Electronic Engineer 

Franklin D. Moore, 3 Thoreau Road, Airline Pilot 

Samuel Crowther, Jr. , 5 Henley Road, Engineer 

John W. Putnam, 352 Pope Road, Research Executive 

John H. Boyd, 55 Alcott Street, Civil Engineer 

Richard W. Coburn, 852 Main Street, Retired 

Norman G. Cranna, 16 Hemlock Lane, Physicist 

Paul W. Greenough, 36 Newtown Road, Cost Accountant 

Donald C. Higgins, 2 Whittier Drive, Staff Engineer 

Albert W. Koch, 82 Alcott Street, Audiologist 

Aldo R. Miccioli, 6 Hawthorne Street, Electrical Engineer 

Charles E. Miller, Jr. , 29 Minuteman Road, Machinist 

David W. Sigourney, 242 Great Road, Engineer 

David W. Stonecliffe, 6 Phalen Street, Electronic Engineer 

Leonard Werst, 3 Whittier Drive, Elect. Engineer 

Edward L. York, 8 Green Wood Lane, Manager 

PRECINCT 2 

Arthur H. Donaldson, 5 Billings Street, Mechanic 

Roland R. MacLean, 46 Central Street, Prod. Eng. 

Thomas C. Searle, 249 Parker Street, Mechanical Engineer 

H, Bradford Sturtevant, III, 12 Laurel Court, Assistant Treasurer 

Bruce D. Smith, 6 Ashwood Road, Engineer 

Francis J. Schell, 46 Conant Street, Research Engineer 

Robert M. Lydiard, 4 Fairway Road, Controller 

Charles W. Pappas, 1 Fairway Road, Salesman 

Sumner D. Zimmer, 278 School Street, Hydrogen Plant Operator 

J. Edward Sibel, 266 High Street, Office Manager 

George Pederson, 16 Maple Street, Floor Installation 

Carl F. Beyer, 27 Oakwood Road, Technician 

Richard A. Lowden, 172 Main Street, Truck Driver 

C. Robert Armstrong, 49 Parker Street, Textile Broker 

Roger M. Huebsch, 16 Tuttle Drive, Dairy Manager 

Richard C. Janson, 21 Oakwood Road, Sales Representative 

Edward W. Jones, 59 High Street, Eng. Writer 

John L. Lennon, 34 Robbins Street, Engineer 

Leon T. Matthys, 16 Beverly Road, Advertising Manager 



134 



William F. McMahon, 14 Central Street, Chauffeur 

Peter C. Mutty, 5 Pinewood Road, Engineer 

Henry H. Norris, 39 School Street, Laboratory Technician 

Cleon E. Phelps, 12 Sylvia Street, Manager 

Rollen Redmond, 208 Parker Street, Manager' 

David E. Sironen, 120 Stow Street, Technician Engineer 

PRECINCT 3 

Harrison D. Foote, 11 Seneca Road, Salesman 

Donald R. Thompson, 372 Arlington Street, Airplane Mechanic 

Alfred R. Hermes, 292 Central Street, Credit Reporter 

John E. Dunphy, Jr. , 3 Algonquin Road, Engineer 

George H. Charter, 79 Charter Road, Machinist 

Frederick J. Karr, 3 Ethan Allen Drive, Opr. Superintendent 

Walter J. Johnson, 11 Marian Road, Oil Service and Credit Manager 

David C. Hartzell, 42 Nash Road, Assistant Personnel Manager 

Lawrence B. Kelley, 15 Nashoba Road, Draftsman 

Ahti E. Autio, 5 Joseph Reed Lane, Tech. Staff 

Clarence W. Benson, 315 Arlington Street, Salesman 

Edward M. Cady, 17 Nash Road, Finisher 

Edward A. Chambers, 3 Cherry Ridge Road, Engineer 

Albert C. Conrod, 102 Willow Street, Physicist 

Harvey S. Donnelly, Jr. , 14 Juniper Ridge Road, Pharmacist 

Joseph A. Falite, 15 Duggan Road, Sales Manager 

Warren L. Newell, 9 Orchard Drive, Inst. Assembler 

Robert A. North, 84 Willow Street, Quality Control Manager 

Victor G. Pappas, 36 Agawam Road, Personnel 

Ralph K. Peterson, 11 Orchard Drive, Laboratory Technician 

Everett R. Proud, 8 Ethan Allen Drive, Engineer 

Paul I. Richardson, 103 Central Street, Custodian 

Richard M. Sawdo, 129 Willow Street, Research Staff 

Frank H. Tobin, Jr., 18 Juniper Ridge Road, Engineer 

Robert J. Trocki, 9 Spencer Road, Pharmacist 



135 



INDEX 



Accountant 96 

Animal Inspector 27 

Appeals, Board of 22 

Appointments 131 

Archives Committee 45 

Assessors 115 

Auditor 127 

Births 52 

Building Committee 22 

Building Inspector 23 

Bylaw Committee 40 

Cemetery Commission 46 

Civil Defense , 13 

Collector 116 

Conservation Commission 43 

Dog Licenses •. 57 

Dog Officer 57 

Durkee Memoriam 115 

Election 58 

Elizabeth White Fund 50 

Engineering Department 19 

Finance Committee (See Warrant Supplement) 

Fire Department 15 

Goodnow Fund 50 

Health, Board of 24 

Industrial Development Commission 51 

Insurance Committee 49 

Jury List 134 

Library Reports 36 

Moth Superintendent 45 

Officers ^ 131 

Personnel Board 47 

Planning Board 20 

Police Department 11 

Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee 5 

Recreation Commission 38 

School Report 29 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 21 

Selectmen 10 

Sewerage Study Committee 41 

Sidewalk Study Committee 18 

Street Light Committee 19 

Streets, Superintendent of 16 

Town Administration 39 

Town Employees Insurance Advisory Committee 50 

Town Forest Committee 44 

Town Meeting Proceedings: 

March 8, 1965 61 

June 7, 1965 87 

November 15, 1965 88 

Treasurer's Report 118 

Tree Warden 44 

Veterans Agent 48 

Veterans' Graves Officer 46 

Welfare Board 28 

Wires Inspector 23 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 49 



136 



POLICE EMERGENCY 263-2911 

FIRE EMERGENCY 263-4321 

(Emergency Only) 

BE SURE TO GIVE YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS AS WELL AS THE NATURE OF YOUR EMERGENCY CLEARLY. DO NOT HANG UP UNTIL YOU ARE 
SURE THAT YOUR MESSAGE HAS BEEN UNDERSTOOD. 



Town Office - Call 263-2761 



FOR ANSWERS ON: 

Assessments 

Bills and Accounts, Taxes 

Birth, Death, Marriage Certificates 

Building 

Cemeteries 

Dog, Hunting, and Fishing Licenses 

Dog Problems 

Education Information 

Elections, Voting, and Registration 

Engineering 

Fire (routine) 

Garbage and Refuse, Health and Sanitation 

Highways and Streets 

Industrial Development 

Library 

Licenses 

Nurse (School) 

Nurse (Town) 

Oil Burner Permits 

Permits for Burning 

Plumbing Permits 

Recreation 

Schools: 



Veterans' Services 
Water Problems 
Welfare Questions 
Zoning 



CALL THE TELEPHONE 

Board of Assessors 263-5012 

Treasurer and Collector 263-7018 

Town Clerk 263-2761 

Building Inspector 263-2761 

Cemetery Superintendent 263-4428 

Town Clerk 263-2761 

Dog Officer 263-4342 

School Superintendent 263-5737 

Town Clerk 263-2761 

Town Engineer 263-7545 

Fire Department 263-4366 

Board of Health 263-4736 

Highway Department 263-5332 

Industrial Development Commission 263-4691 

Librarian 263-2232 

Selectmen or Board of Health 263-2761 

or 263-4736 

School Nurse 263-7738 

Town Nurse 263-4736 

Fire Chief 263-4366 

Fire Department 263-4366 

Board of Health 263-4736 

Recreation Commission 263-7257 

Julia McCarthy 263-4982 

Marion L. Towne 263-4982 

Florence Merriam 263-2581 

Acton-Boxborough Regional Junior High (Available 9/66) 

Acton-Boxborough Regional Senior High 263-7738 

Veterans' Agent 263-4757 

Water District (not part of Town of Acton) 263-5646 

Welfare Board (Office in Bedford) - Call Collect 275-6668 

Selectmen 263-2761 



MEETINGS 

Annual Town Election 

Annual Town Meeting 

Appeals Board 

Assessors 

Building Committee 

Conservation Commission 

Finance Committee 

Health Board 

Industrial Development Commission 

Library Trustees 

Planning Board 

Recreation Commission 

School Committee: 

Regional 

Local 
Selectmen 



DAY and TIME 

1st Monday in March 

2nd Monday in March 

Meet when necessary 

1st Mon. each month, 10 a.m. 

1st and 3rd Wed. each month, 7:30 p.m. 

1st Thurs. each month, 8 p.m. 

Oct. thru Feb., Thurs. at 8 p.m. 

Rest of year Thurs. on call 
2nd and 4th Mon. each month, 7:45 p.m. 
1st Wed. each month, 8 p.m. 
2nd Mon. ea. month, 7:30 p.m. 
2nd and 4th Mon. each month, 7:30 p.m. 
2nd Tues. each month, 7:30 p.m. 

2nd Mon. each month, 7:30 p.m. 
3rd Mon. each month, 7:30 p.m. 
Every Tues. at 7 p.m. 



PLACE 

Precinct Fire Stations 

Blanchard Auditorium, A-B Regional High School 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

South Acton Fire Station 

Center Fire Station 

South Acton Fire Station 

Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Memorial Library 
Center Fire Station 
Town Hall 

School Committee Room at A-B Regional Sr. High School 
School Committee Room at A-B Regional Sr. High School 
Town Hall 






■',!,. J 




nnimL <yce 

C^own ofOfclon 
igoo 



# 



pari 



\JYlm Special Uomervation Jvepori 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Incorporated as a Town: July 3, 1735 

Type of Governmeni: Town Meeting-Selectmen 

Location: Eastern Massachusetts, Middlesex County, bordered on 

the east by Carlisle and Concord, on the west by Box- 
borough, on the north by Westford and Littleton, on the 
south by Sudbury, and on the southwest by Stow and] 
Maynard. 

Name: Acton as the name of our Town has several possible 

derivations: the old Saxon word Ac -tun meaning oak 
settlement or hamlet in the oaks, the Town of Acton, 
England, the Acton family of England, a member of 
which supposedly offered a bell for the first meeting^ 
house in 1735. 

Elevation at Tov;n Hall: 268' above mean sea level. 

J^and Area: Approximately 20 square miles. 

Population: Year Persons Density 

1910 2136 106 per sq. mi. 

1950 3510 175 

1955 4681 233 

1960 7238 361 

1965 10188 507 

Climate: Normal January temperature 27.7°F. 

Normal July temperature 72.0°F. 

Normal annual precipitation 43.02 inches. 

Public Education: Pupil enrollment (December 1966): 

Grades 1-6, 2016; Grades 7-12, 1498 (Regional) 
Number of teachers and administrative staff: 190 
Pupil -teacher ratio: 1 to 29 (avg. all grades) 
Expenditure per pupil: Grades 1-6, $346; 
Grades 7-12, $530. 

Tax Picture: Year Tax Rate Assessed Valuatio nI 

1962 $82 $14, 168, 525 

1963 83 15,799,455 

1964 86 17,207,395 

1965 92 18,408,058 

1966 29 70,309,795 

United States Senators in Congress: Edward W. Brooke (R), Newton, Massachusetts 

Edward M. Kennedy (D), Boston, Massachusetts 
Representative in Congress, 3rd Congressional Dist: . . . Philip J. Philbin (D), Clinton, Massachusetts 
State Senator, Middlesex and Worcester District: .... William I. Randall, Framingham, Massachusetts 
Representative, General Court, 13th Middlesex Dist: . . Jolin A. S. McGlennon, Concord, Massachusetts 
Governor's Council, 3rd District: George F. Cronin, Jr., Boston, Massachusetts 



OFFICE HOURS 



Town Office (Selectmen, Clerk) 

Treasurer and Collector 

Assessors 

School Superintendent 

Boaid of Health 

Veterans' Agent 

Library Hours: 

Memorial Library 

Citizens, W. Acton 



7:30p.m.) 

7:30-8:30p.m.) 

7:30-8:30p.m.) 



8-4:30 (Tues. 

8-4:30 (Tues. 

8-4:30 (Tues. 

8-4:30 

8-4:30 

No Regular Hours 

Mon.-Frl., l-9p.m. 
Saturday, 10-6 p.m. 
Mon., 7-9p.m., Tues., 3-6p.m. 
Thurs., 3-5 p. rn. 



Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

A-B Regional H. S. 

Office at 69 Hayward Rd. 

At Home 



263-271 

263-701 

263-5( 

263-57^ 

263-47S 

263 -47i 

263-22! 



Mail to: Secretary, Board of Selectmen 
Box 236 
Acton, Massachusetts 01720 

PUBLIC SERVICE REQUEST 

Name Telephone: Home 

, , , Business 

Address _____^ 



I am interested in serving on the following Town Committees: (Indicate 
your choice in order of preference. See reverse side for listing of offices and 
committees.) 

1. 

2. 

3. 

I would be available on and could devote 

hours per week as a public servant. 

PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING 



TOWN OFFICES HELD: 

Date Appointed Office Term Expired 



GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU 



Finance Committee 

Board of Appeals 

Town Forest Committee 

Recreation Commission 

Fence Viewers 

Field Drivers 

Burial Agent 

Veteran's Agent 

Director of Veteran's Services 

Transportation Advisory Committee 

Director and Deputy of Civil Defense 

Archives Committee 

Town Report Committee 

Personnel Board 

Industrial Development Commission 

Permanent Building Committee 

Town Building-Land Acquisition Committee 

Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee 

Conservation Commission 

Sidewalk Committee 

Street Lighting Committee 

Town Administration Study Committee 

Sewerage Study Committee 

Regional Refuse Disposal Study Committee 



The filling out of this form in no way assures appointment. 



i 



ANNUAL REPORTS 




TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR ITS 

TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY-FIRST 

MUNICIPAL YEAR 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER THIRTY-FIRST 



1966 




Partridge Pond 



CONSERVATION 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

In June, the Conservation Commission purchased 22.8 acres of land in East Acton from the Pope Road Land 
Trust. The Commission is hoping to purchase an additional 27 acres, that abuts this land, at the Annual Town 
Meeting in 1967. Several other land owners have been contacted during the year, relative to land available for 
conservation purposes. The Commission is interested in the purchase or gift of land that would serve conserva- 
tion ends. Any suggestions from townspeople would be welcome. 

For five weeks this summer, Frank Brooker, a Brandeis student, assisted the Commission. While here 
he made a card file of all lands in the Town, cross indexed with the Town Atlas, surveyed and reported to the 
Conservation Commission on some 15 Hatch Act Cases and identified land in Town where ownership is unknown. 

The Commission assisted in getting the Town of Acton into the Metropolitan Area Planning Council. A long 
range Conservation plan for the Town has been prepared by the Commission. It is hoped to conserve the lands 
along Nashoba and Fort Pond Brooks; the quaking bogs. Will's Hole and Grassy Pond; the Town Forests; water 
impoundment areas and open spaces (see map on center fold). 

During the year members of the Connmission have attended ten Hatch Act hearings and will continue to 
attend all hearings on Hatch Act cases. They will maintain an active interest in the results of the hearings. 

The Commission, realizing that open spaces are of economic value to the Town, is currently developing a 
plan by which the tax burden upon land owners of large undeveloped tracts of land in Acton can be eased. 

Efforts to preserve the Isaac Davis Trail are continuing. Two more easements have been obtained and hope- 
fully will be presented to the Town for acceptance at the Annual Meeting. 

In May, Dr. Samuel Sutcliffe, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Tufts University, was appointed to 
fill the term vacated by David Tinker. Robert Ellis, Chairman of the Commission, has been appointed a Director 
of the Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions. Franklin Charter of the Town Forest Committee 
has been made an associate member of the Conservation Commission. As a result of the work of the Natural 
Resources Committee, of which Chan Waldron is a member, a Town resources inventory has been received by 
the Town. Many ideas from the report were incorporated in the over -all conservation inventory plan for the Town. 

CONSERVATION AND THE CITIZEN 

In the minds of many, a Conservation Commission is just a group which comes to Town Meetings asking 
for money to buy a few acres of swamp or soggy woodland so that it will not be turned into a supermarket by a 
developer. These same citizens might wonder what conservation has to do with them. 







* - ..,-•'«. 







*s^- 




To answer this question, it must be said that the 
goal of conservation is not to deny people the pleasure 
or convenience of visiting their local handy-dandy shop- 
ping center at ex Mosquito Corners. It is. the goal of 
conservation to assist the Town in maintaining plentiful 
water supplies, preventing future flooding, obtaining 
recreational areas, and providing educational opportuni- 
ties for children of the area. Stated in these terms, 
conservation goals are identical to the goals of the 
responsible citizen who is thus a subconscious (or con- 
scious) conservationist. 

Beginning with the obvious -- what one can see -- 
the appearance of a Town plays a part in attracting resi- 
dents. Conservation practices keep a Town attractive by 
insuring variety in land use. Citizens expect their Town 
to be a desirable place in which to raise families. Con- 
servation enters the picture here through the acquisition 
of public recreational areas. Conservation, through pro- 
vision of formal and informal nature study areas, can 
give children an intimate look at their natural heritage 
and first-hand experiences of nature at work in their lives. 



m,' 



A matter of vital importance to a Town's citizens, 
their water supply, can be directly affected by conserva- 



tion pi'actices. Water' run-off is delayed by swampy 
ai'eas which hold water, allowing it to seep gradually 
back into the ground, thus replenishing the water sup- 
ply. Ti-ee farms also can assist in water retention. 

Finally, conservation can, by expenditure of 
money, save the taxpayer's dollars. Up to a point, 
undeveloped land is an asset in that it does not re- 
quire services and, in fact, produces appreciated 
evaluation in properties near it; but, beyond that, 
land purchased by a town for conservation provides 
a back-log of resources for the future. Helter- 
skelter growth in some towns has led to the need 
for expensive water projects; lack of space for 
efficient town services; and difficult choices bet- 
ween land -taking by eminent domain, time-consum- 
ing, expensive and distasteful to many; and loss of 
irreplaceable park or school land. 




-^fe. 



^m' 



The answer to the question as to who has a 
real stake in local conservation is everyone. 
Conservation, or the lack of it, touches us all where 
we feel it the most -- our homes, our children, and 
our pocketbooksl 




# 








THE STREAMS OF ACTON 

Acton has only two main streams within its 
bounds. Both flow in an easterly direction and join 
together in West Concord to flow into the Assabet 
River. 



Fort Pond Brook begins in Littleton on the west- 
erly side of Fort Pond. From there is meanders 
through the highlands of West Acton, passes under 
Massachusetts Avenue, skirts Jones Field, and is 
dammed at Erikson's Dam in South Acton. Below this 
dam there is a series of abandoned dams, all in a 
state of disrepair, none of which impound a significant 
amount of water. 



'>f/- 



M 



Fort Pond Brook is in urgent need of an anti- 
pollution cleanup campaign sponsored by the Town of 
Acton. There is not one other natural resource in the 
Town that has a greater need of strict public control. 

Nashoba Brook begins near the Acton-Westford 
line, flows due east, and crosses Route 27 near the 
Wicke's Lumber Corporation in North Acton. From 
there it enters the last relatively unspoiled wilderness 
watershed in Acton. According to the Soil Conservation 
Service's recently completed Natural Resources Inven- 
tory, the total acreage of this watershed is 8,538 acres, 
much of which remains in its natural state. The stream 
crosses Route 2A, flows past the Conant Well and under 
Brook Street to the water empoundment area of the Old 
Concord Ice Company in East Acton. Although most of 
the course of the stream from the Westford line to the 
Ice House Pond is through undeveloped areas and is free 



This once lovely stream is now severely polluted. 
It is unsafe for swimming. Only the hardiest of fish 
can survive. Few boatsmen desire to use its waters. 
The bacterial count is nearly high enough to qualify it 
as an open sewer. The cause of this pollution is 
domestic sewage which enters the brook incompletely 
treated from malfunctioning, worn out, inadequate or 
non-existent septic systems. 








from domestic pollution, the stream has been severe- 
ly damaged in recent years by extensive gravel 
removal operations near its source. These operations 
have contaminated the water, reduced its supply, and 
raised its temperature to the point that its ability to 
support game fish has been drastically reduced. 
Although some of the damage done to Nashoba Brook 
is irrepairable, the Brook is nevertheless an extreme- 
ly valuable asset to the Town of Acton. At present 
most of the stream course and its flood plain is owned 
by conservation -minded individuals, but the future 
safety of this natural resource dictates that control 
and ownership of this stream be brought into the pub- 
lic domain. 

These two streams drain over ninety-five per- 
cent of the area of the Town, and are probably the 
two most important natural resources within the Town 
boundaries. The cornerstone of almost any compre- 
hensive conservation program is clean water and an 
access to it. 

It would be indeed fortunate if the trends of the 
past were not only halted but reversed,, so that the 
potential value of Fort Pond Brook and Nashoba Brook 
could be fully developed for the citizens of Acton. 



THE PROBLEM OF POLLUTION 

The problem of waste disposal in all of its various forms draws top attention at the national, state and 
local levels today. The First Lady has taken on the leadership in the waste disposal and/or clean-up activity 
across the nation through her Beautification Program. It is her intent to provide cleaner, more useable open 
spaces and recreation lands through proper waste disposal methods. 

By definition, pollution is the act of making unclean or impure. It is obvious that improper methods of 
waste disposal do in fact pollute the air and streams and the lakes. There are techniques which can eliminate 
this pollution and potential health hazard from the air we breathe and the water we drink. 



Solid waste disposal is generally accomplished by direct burial, burning, or bacterial decomposition. 
Direct burial or land fill nnethod is the cleanest over-all, however it becomes more costly as land costs increase. 
Burning is the primary source of air pollution since most disposal facilities (either open faced burning or con- 
ventional incinerators) are improperly operated. These plants exclude about 20 percent of the total waste col- 
lected and leave an additional 20 percent residue. 

There is now being developed a high temperature (about 3000°F) incinerator which will take all waste mate- 
rials leaving a completely inert lava-like residue of about 2 percent of the original volume. The extremely high 
temperature reduces the air pollution products to a minimum and these are removed through an exhaust stack 
wash device. 

A system of solid waste disposal based upon bac- 
terial decomposition (composting) will handle only the 
organic materials -- garbage, etc. The inorganic mate- 
rials must be disposed of in some other manner. Usu- 
ally, a large salvage activity is collocated with the 
composting plant to offset some of the cost of this waste 
disposal method. 

Liquid or sewerage waste materials are also a 
pollution factor in our Town. Open lands within the Town 
should retain their natural beauty and be available for us 
to enjoy without experiencing the unpleasant odors from 
polluted streams and lakes. The present condition of the 
streams of Acton preclude their full use by fisherman 
and enjoyment for other outdoor recreation or sports 
activities. 

It is the obligation of the Town to dispose of all 
waste products generated within the Town either by resi- 
dence or industry without pollution of air or streams. 
Provision of proper solid waste disposal facilities will 




preclude the continued promiscuous dumping in land areas that would otherwise be natural beauty spots. If a 
person is prohibited from taking certain items (such as old autos) to the Town dump, he must dispose of these 
somewhere, usually along stream beds or any other out of the way place. His only other alternative is to take 
such items to another town, but why should an Acton resident burden another town with these waste products 
unless some commercial interest wants to pick them up at the dumip area? 

Two study committees are now investigating methods of solid and liquid waste disposal. There are federal 
and state financial assistance programs to relieve the tax burden on the residents of Acton in the construction of 
solid or liquid (sewerage) waste disposal systems. The level of federal and state support is now 75 percent of 
the sewage treatment plan construction costs. Further economies may be realized in collocating and interdesign, 
interconstruction and interoperation of the solid waste and liquid waste disposal systems. 

Clean-up of our Town should be started through initiation of the design and construction of the solid and 
liquid waste disposal systems eliminating air and water pollution together with the potential health hazard. 



THE HATCH ACT AND FLOOD PLAIN ZONING 

In 1965, House Bill #2355, "An Act Relating to the Protection of Flood Plains", was passed into law. 
law, now known as the Hatch Act, amended Chapter 131 of the General Laws by adding section 117C. This 
amendment was added by Chapter 220 of the acts of 1965. 



This 



The Hatch Act, briefly stated, provides that "No person shall remove, fill or dredge any bank, flat, marsh, 
meadow or swamp bordering on any inland waters without filing written notice of his intention to so remove, fill 
or dredge including such plans as may be necessary to describe such proposed activity, with the Board of Select- 
men. . . . and with the State Departments of Public Works and Natural Resources." 

This Act is only one of an increasing number of 
laws which clearly indicate that our legislatures, both 
state and federal, are becoming more aware that our in- 
creasing population is endangering the very existence of 
our environment as we know it. 

Chapter 131 of the General Laws defines inland 
waters as all those occurring above the rise and fall of 
the tide. Consequently, this act applies to all inland 
wetlands, and the areas immediately adjacent to them, 
and is intended particularly to regulate alteration proj- 
ects within the active flood plains of rivers and streams. 

At about the time the state legislature was consid- 
ering H2355, various boards in Acton were considering 
actions which could be taken to protect our major stream 
Nashoba Brook and Fort Pond Brook. The activity re- 
sulted in Article 56 being placed on the March 1965 War- 




rant for the Town Meeting. This article called for the 
addition of a Wetlands District W-1 to the Protective 
Zoning Bylaw (and zoning map). 

Drafts of the proposed article had been coordin- 
ated with both the Attorney General's office and the 
Department of Natural Resources. The League of 
Women Voters had undertaken extensive studies of 
Acton's streams and the lands they drain and, as a 
result of these studies, went on record as being in 
favor of protective zoning along all six of our streams. 
The Planning Board had coordinated their proposed 
article with the Conservation Commission, the Board 
of Health, and the Board of Appeals and had incorpor- 
ated their comments into the proposed article. Prior 
to the meeting, the Planning Board urged the towns- 
people to vote favorably on this article. Unfortunately 
at the Town Meeting, the Planning Board moved to pass 
over this article, and all this work was cast aside. 




Since Article 56 was passed over by the Town of Acton and the Hatch Act was passed by the State Legisla- 
ture, many state officials have publicly urged Acton to enact Flood Plain or Wetlands zoning provisions. These 
officials have stated that the Hatch Act itself is not sufficient to provide adequate protection to these irreplace- 
able natural resources, as Hatch Act restrictions upon alteration projects must be based upon the specific land 
in question as it pertains to public or private water supply or to proper flood control only. 

Since passage of the Hatch Act in June 1965, Acton has been involved in approximately 25 cases; the high- 
est in the State. These have ranged from notices from the Selectmen to an alleged violator to a specific order 
issued by the Department of Natural Resources. Several cases have involved filling in flood plains which was 
felt not to be detrimental, and therefore local concurrence was granted. There have been cases, however, 
which have been approved even though the filling was not in the best interests of the Town. This was done be- 
cause of the narrow scope of the Hatch Act, the difficulty of proving detriment to public safety or water supply, 
and the lack of a flood plain zoning provision in our protective zoning bylaws. If these valuable natural resources 
are to be protected in the future, we feel that flood plain zoning provisions must be added to our bylaws. 

TOWN FORESTS AND OTHER PUBLIC LANDS 

Acton is now fortunate in being a Town with a rural character. Large tracts of open and forest land still 
exist. It would be foolish, however, to believe that this situation will remain. Many factors will contribute to 
the long range dissolution of these areas. Acton, divided by Route 2, is only minutes away from Route 495 and 
is but a fast commute to the many industrial plants on the Route 128 Belt. Boston is easily accessible by car 
and train. These factors alone make Acton a very desirable "Bedroom Community". Estate taxes and the lure 
of profit from real estate development force land into the marketplace. 

On the opposite side, sound zoning policies, for which the Town is indeed fortunate, tend to limit and con- 
trol unwise building practices. The recent adoption of larger lot sizes in certain areas of Acton will present a 
further protection of the rural character of those parts of the Town, while not limiting the logical growth of any 
one area. An intelligently managed Town will strive to balance all the varied elements within its population in 
an effort to achieve a stimulating atmosphere not possible if, for example, the townspeople come from one in- 
come bracket or work in similar occupations. 

Logically associated with intelligent land usage is the necessity for certain areas within the Town to be 
set aside in their natural or near natural condition for the general use of the townspeople. It is necessarily 
essential that these areas be set aside before the value of such lands rises beyond the reach of public funds. 

Acton is fortunate in now having two Town Forests: The West Acton Forest, now comprising about 35 
acres, was first contributed to by the purchase of the Durkee Lot in 1926. The Pacy Land purchased for the 
Town through the Conservation Fund in 1965, added about 13 acres and provides a much needed access from a 
Town road. Portions of this land are low -lying and plans will soon be in effect to build a pedestrian boardwalk 
over these areas. This will be particularly important to the townspeople since public access was closed in 1950 
with the building of Route 2. 







The North Acton Forest, known as the Texas Lot, was purchased about 1940 for $10 per acre and com- 
prises about 48 acres. Access is via Quarry Road off Route 27. Maintenance of the two Forests is currently 
limited to $100 per year, appropriated to the Tree Warden's budget. The Scouts have been very helpful in such 
maintenance work under his supervision. 



A recent addition to Town land ownership was the purchase by the Acton Conservation Commission of 22.8 
acres of land located off Spring Hill Road. (It is interesting to note the rise in land values, as this parcel of 
land was bought for $500 per acre.) Among the Warrant Articles for the March 1967 Town Meeting will be one 
for the purchase of twenty-seven acres located in two sections on either side of the above mentioned land. Each 
voter is urged to support the Conservation Commission in its effort to secure these areas for the townspeople. 

It should be emphasized that the Town is eligible for a reimbursement of up to 50 percent of the cost of a 
land acquisition under the State "Self-Help Program" or up to 75 percent under a combination of State and Fed- 
eral programs. Usage of these Town lands is up to the townspeople; but one fact must certainly be clear to all 
who observe the increasing development of the Town: utilizing a responsible plan for their preservation and 
utilization, certain lands, when available, must be set aside for our heirs. 

CONSERVATION LAND USE IN ACTON 



In the Acton Master Plan Report of 1961, the following statement is made with regard to conservation 
practices in the Town: 

"For conservation lands there are no quantitative yardsticks whatsoever. This is gener- 
ally a matter of the character and availability of land and the community attitude toward 
the subject. What is involved is the preservation of the 'Rural Amenities'. It is impor- 
tant to consider the effect of the destruction, removal or redevelopment of this piece of 
land, this drumlin, stream, lake or valley and its impact on the Town. It is important 
to determine what each portion of the landscape contributes to the protection of the water 
resources of the area, the historical significance of the region, or the natural resources 
of the community." 

Prior to the Master Plan and the establishment of a Town Conservation Commission, both good and poor 
conservation were being practiced, although perhaps called by a different name. The Town owned lands, such 
as the Town Forests, Meeting House Hill, the Common in Acton Center, and ball-playing fields insured various 
types of open -space areas. On the other hand, the filling in of brooks, bogs, swamp land, and the stripping of 
soil and vegetation all in the name of municipal and/or economic progress for the Town destroyed forever the 
natural value of these particular areas. Today, thanks to diligent work by the Town officers and boards, and 
the enthusiastic support of its citizens to vote funds and bylaws, well-defined progress is being made to preserve 
for future generations open spaces throughout the Town. 

The pictures and comments that follow are in- 
dicative of the direction the Town is now heading. 
Unfortunately, past abuses still stand, but hopefully, 
such disregard for the needs of future citizens, will 
not be repeated. 

Home builders and land developers today are 
taking advantage not only of the flexibility provided by 
various lot sizes, but also in many instances are mak 
ing use of the natural resources of the area to improve ^ 
the attractiveness of their developments. We have 
wetlands that have been enlarged to include ponds -- 
some even have ducks on them -- and more Common 
land for the use of all residents is also being provided 
for both active and passive utilization. 

The Garden Club is insuring the preservation 
and attractiveness of Acton Center through plantings 
of the Common Land and Meeting House Hill. The 
tree department sets out over 40 trees a year and 
prunes many more to maintain our shaded roads. 

Some large land owners are now engaged in tree 
farming rather than leaving the land fallow. Another 
has harvested his tree crop planted over 50 years ago, 
cleared the land, and once again returned it to crops. 
The Town continues to have a modern efficient dairy 
farm, and many acres are still farmi lands and apple 
orchards. < - ■■<a«3.^rHBia.si«ij;-' 




The school boards have endeavored to provide more than just academic education through the provision of 
the nature walk behind the Merriam School and the natural pine grove between the high school and the Blanchard 
Auditorium. 

Our two great brooks. Fort Pond and Nashoba are a natural resource above and beyond any other in the 
community. They were the very life blood of early settlements supporting both agriculture and industry. No 
other natural feature of the Town has a greater need for present control and future integration into the Town's 



10 




growth. The majority of our Town wells are adjacent to these brooks, and over 95 percent of the water drainage 
in the Town flows into these streams. There are still lovely pools to sit by or fish in, and while some positive 
steps are now being taken by organizations and boards to protect their existence, examples of misuse occur 
throughout the Town. 

As we begin 1967, your Commission believes that the Town has the beginnings of quantitative yardsticks, 
and in accordance with our conservation Master Plan, our course is well defined and can be accomplished and 
improved through the continued enthusiasm and support of the citizens of the Town. 

Robert J. Ellis, Chairman 

John A. Jeffries, Jr. 

William L. Kingman 

Alice May 

Richard H. Murphy 

Samuel Sutcliffe 

Chandler Waldron, Jr. 

Franklin H. Charter, Associate Member 



11 



SELECTMEN 



The Board organized as follows on March 8, 1966: John H. Loring, Chairman; Mary K. Hadley, member 
and Warren F. Birch, Clerk. 

During the year 1966, the Board held 43 regular meetings and 26 special meetings. In addition the Board 
held public hearings in connection with dog complaints, utility pole locations. Hatch Act proposals and on other 
subjects where hearings are not required but in the public interest, the Board was of the opinion that decisions 
should be made on the basis of a broader opinion than that of the Board alone. 

We have continued our previously established policy of maintaining close liaison with all other boards and 
committees in the Town. This has resulted in a continually improving relationship and understanding of prob- 
lems between all those responsible for the efficient operation of Town affairs. 

During 1965 the Board requested that the Middlesex Conservation District make a study of sites with Natur- 
al Resources Development potential within the Town. An advisory group consisting of members of the Board of 
Selectmen, Planning Board, Conservation Commission, Water District, Recreation Commission, Board of 
Health, School Committee, Sewerage Study Committee, Cemetery Department and the Engineering Department 
was formed for the purpose. This group met on several occasions with representatives of the following agencies: 
U.S.D.A. Soil Conservation Service, Massachusetts Division of Forests and Parks, Massachusetts Division of 
Fisheries and Game, Middlesex County Extension Service, and Massachusetts Water Resources Commission. 
As a result of this program, the Middlesex Conservation District prepared and presented, in June 1966, a report 
of these Natural Resources potentials, with an inventory of what we now have and specific proposals for future 
development. We gratefully acknowledge the effort of all those who participated in this program. We are con- 
vinced that this document will be of invaluable assistance to all Town Boards and Committees that are making 
decisions and recommendations for the future development of Acton. 

With the construction of the new Library facility in Acton Center, it became evident early in 1966 that the 
Highway Department could not properly operate from its location in the rear of the Town Hall. We, therefore, 
recommended the rental of space at 69 Hayward Road. This was voted at the Annual Town Meeting and the High- 
way Department moved into the building on April 1, 1966. In addition, the building provided office space for the 
Engineering Department, Building Inspector, Board of Health and Planning Board, due to their expanding require 
ments in cramped quarters in the Center Fire Station and the Town Hall. These moves allowed much needed 
space for the Board of Assessors in the Town Hall. 

The use of this building on a temporary basis has been extremely satisfactory and has allowed us, through 
the Town Building-Land Acquisition Committee, to make a more in depth study of the Town's future administra- 
tive and public works needs. A progress report is included elsewhere in the Town Report. 

While searching for a registered engineer for the Town, we decided to use qualified engineers on a part- 
time basis. As a result Charles Perkins was employed in October 1965 to be in charge of the department. In 
October 1966, Samuel Sutcliffe was employed as consultant. Each works about ten hours weekly which is just 
enough to assist the Planning Board in subdivision planning and keep abreast of crises. 

The Board spent nnany hours on such problems as committee appointments, departmental personnel and 
operational problems, and official acts as State's Agent, which are too detailed to highlight in this report. The 
details of individual and committee accomplishments are not included here, but may be found in their reports. 

A revision of the Traffic Rules and Orders was accomplished during the year and is awaiting action by the 
Massachusetts Departnnent of Public Works before becoming effective. 

During the past year arrangements were worked out with surrounding towns to appoint their police officers 
as special officers in Acton. These towns. Concord, Maynard, Stow, Boxboro, and Littleton in turn will appoint 
Acton officers as specials to further improve mutual aid between the towns. 

A study of Police Department procedures has led the Board to formulate a manual of rules for that depart- 
ment and it is expected that these will be formally adopted early in 1967. 

A study of the Fire Department administrative and operational procedures has led the Board to recommend 
Town Meeting action to amend the organization of the Fire Department by substituting a full-time Deputy Chief 
in place of the present part-time Deputy Chiefs. 

The Board also takes this occasion to note the planned retirement of Fire Chief H. Stuart MacGregor in the 
fall of 1967, a dedicated servant of the Town of Acton, a member of the Fire Department for forty-three years 
and Chief of the Fire Department since 1933. His leadership and initiative over the years have immeasurably 
contributed to the establishment of a well-equipped department with eager and interested personnel. 



12 



We wish to thank all committees, boards, employees and citizens who have shown a keen interest in the 
government of the Town and have therefore been extremely helpful to the Board to the end that decisions made 
are as nearly as possible acceptable to all and at the same time serve the best interest of the Town. 




Miss Virginia Milbery, Executive Clerk at the Town Hall, receives the 
Outstanding Municipal Employee Award presented by Selectmen Warren 
Birch (left), Mary Hadley, and Chairman John Loring on behalf of the 
Massachusetts League of Cities and Towns. 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



The Personnel Board unanimously supports a 5 percent general increase for eligible employees. This is 
a considerable judgment made after evaluating all relative factors. 

The Personnel Board is also unanimous in its belief that the Town of Acton should have a Town Manager 
as soon as practicable. 

During the year a one -week seminar covering certain aspects of management was provided town depart- 
ment heads. 

Further review of job content of Town positions is planned for the coming year in keeping with the growini 
size of the Town. 




Standing, John L. Maes (left), David L. 
Anderson. Seated (left to right) Clyde J. 
Home, Lyman H. Goff, Jr., Chairman, 
and William H. Kemp. 



13 



POLICE 



Department Organization 

Chief of Police, two Sergeants, nine Patrolmen, four Specials (part-time), and two Matrons (part-time). 
There were no personnel changes during the year. 

Training of Personnel 

Our training consists of six weeks at the State Police Academy at Framingham. All Officers must attend 
the Academy prior to coming on the Department. Our Safety Officer receives training and information through 
the Massachusetts Safety Officer's League. The use of firearms is taught at the Academy. Thereafter practice 
is all that is necessary. In 1966 all regular members of the Department attended and qualified for the advanced 
course in First Aid. 

In 1966, Officer Norman L. Roche completed a five-year part-time course at Northeastern University and 
received an Associates degree in the field of Law Enforcement. 



Arrests 

Physical Arrests 

Male 

Female 

Juvenile 

Causes of Arrests 

Crimes Against the Person 
Crimes Against Property 
Crimes Against Public Order 

Grand Total 

Services Rendered 

Complaints Investigated 

Licenses: 

Bicycles Registered 
Liquor I. D. Cards 
Revolver Permiits 
To Sell Firearms 



Cruiser Responses 



65 

60 

5 

17 



5 
22 

15 

42 



255 



690 

2 

86 

4 

782 

2, 107 



Services Rendered (continued) 

Cruiser Ambulance Trips: 
Acton Medical Center 
Emerson Hospital 
Metropolitan State Hospital 



Persons: 

Motorists Assisted 
Resuscitator Used 



Property: 

Doors Found Unlocked in Build- 
ings and Places of Business 
House Checks 
Fire Alarms Answered 



Notifications: 
Calls to DPW 
Edison, Street Lights Out and 

Wires Down 
Summonses Served 
Summonses Sent Out of Town 

Grand Total 



14 

163 

6 

183 



28 
15 
43 



71 
417 
117 
605 



45 

128 

609 
261 



1. 043 
5, 018 



Traffic Control 

Total Number of Accidents 

Reported to the Department 
Parking Violations 

Motor Vehicle Violations Prosecuted 



1965 1966 



188 230 

61 16 

424 



Violations Reported to Registry 
of Motor Vehicles 

Court Action 
Warnings 

Total Citations Issued 



424 
154 

578 



Community Relations 

This year our station has been a constant Open House for many civic groups in Town. I would estimate we 
have had thirty groups consisting of the several different ranks of Boy and Girl Scouts, kindergarten and grade 
one of Grammar School through Junior High. 

Occasionally we run films for adult groups such as the one we ran for the West Acton Woman's Club in 
January of 1967. 

We are working with civic leaders and leaders of the churches to establish some sort of program to assist 
the young people of juvenile ages. 



14 



Safety Officer 

The Department has one part-time Safety Officer. His function is focused mainly on Traffic Safety. This 
year Safety Officer David W. Scribner ran several films for different organizations in the Town. Also, films 
on Safety were shown at the schools. He makes recommendations to the Chief on Safety hazards that should be 
corrected. He attends monthly meetings of the Massachusetts Safety Officer's League. 

Juvenile Officer 

Our Juvenile Officer works on a part-time basis. He is a regular Officer of the Department who handles, 
in addition to his regular job, the Juvenile Officer's post. Officer Robert S. Rhodes must keep abreast of all 
new laws pertaining to juvenile offenders. He attends monthly meetings of the Massachusetts Juvenile Officer's 
Association to ascertain the latest methods of handling juvenile problems. In 1967 he will attend a course for 
Juvenile Officers sponsored by Northeastern University. 

Juvenile Officers' Activities 



Complaints Investigated 

Referred to Juvenile Court of 
Probation Department 



17 



11 



Handled within the Dept. and Released 5 

Referred to another Police Agency 1 

Total 17 



In closing I would like to thank all the members of the Department, and my Secretary who worked with me 
in carrying out the duties of the Police Department during the year and to all others who assisted us, I am 
grateful. 

Edward J. Collins, Jr. 
Chief of Police 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



During the past year, the Acton Civil Defense Agency has maintained its qualifying position for participa- 
tion in Federal Financial Assistance Programs. Under this program, surplus property having a current value 
of $350 has been acquired at a cost of $66.25. This equipment will be used by the Highway Department. In addi- 
tion, reimbursement in the amount of $178.75 was received from the Federal Government as matching funds for 
firefighters' coats and boots purchased for the Auxiliary Fire Department in 1965. 

Robert F. Cuba, Deputy Director and Communications Officer, planned and directed a well -organized 
hurricane drill this past October and demonstrated the ability of his personnel to provide emergency radio 
communications. 

Two additional locations in Acton were surveyed by the Corps of Engineers as possible public shelters. 
Official reports have not yet been received regarding their qualifications for use. 

An article has been submitted for the 1967 Annual Town Meeting requesting the expenditure of $1,000 for 
plans to modify an existing area in the Elm Street School for use as an Emergency Operating Center. Because 
of its below-grade position, this location is the most suitable thus far and would provide a location for key 
municipal operations during a natural or war -caused disaster. In order to qualify for Federal Financial Assist- 
ance, the construction of an Emergency Operating Center requires that nuclear fallout protection be already 
present in the structure or be provided in the alteration plans. 

John F. McLaughlin 
Director 



15 




0> 

E 



16 



FIRE 



I herewith submit my thirty-fourth annual report of the Fire Department for the year ending December 31, 
1966. 

Total number of alarms responded to are as follows: 



Residential 25 

Non Residential 1 

Mercantile 1 

Manufacturing 8 

Miscellaneous 3 

Grass and Brush 92 

Automobile and Outside Equipment 30 

Malicious False Alarms 11 

Smoke Scares and Accidental 16 

Accidents and Emergencies 147 

Out of Town 18 

352 

Loss to Buildings $100,300.00 

Loss to Contents 161, 073. 00 

Loss to Automobiles 1, 670. 00 

$263,043.00 



Permits Issued: 



Oil and Power Burners 156 

Blasting 45 

Open Air Fires 1807 

Inspections and Investigations 862 



Collected: 



$ 


102. 


00 




610. 


00 




123. 


00 




62. 


00 



Permits 

Station Rental 

Miscellaneous 

Testing Water Mains 

$ 897. 00 

Capital Outlay: 

Alarm Systenns Extensions 

Newtown Road to Evergreen Road $ 494. 00 

Elm Street to Elementary School i . 170.60 

Hayward Road to Jefferson Drive and Box 632. 00 

Fire Alarm Boxes Installed by Town and Others: 

Box #1141 - Memorial Library 

Box #1236 - Hayward Road at Jefferson Drive 

Box #13 - Newtown Road at Evergreen Road 

Box #1322 - Musket Drive 

Box #1333 - Larch Road at Balsam Drive 

Box #1334 - Evergreen Road at Hammond Street 

Box #158 - Old Village Road 

Box #3441 - Elm Street Elementary School 

Box #3451 - St. Matthews Methodist Church 

Box #4222 - Bayberry Road at Magnolia Drive 

Box #5211 - Acton Manor Nursing Home 

Fire Alarm Wires Extended by Others : 

Larch Road 
Evergreen Road 
Pope Road 
Bayberry Road 
Musket Drive 
Old Village Road 



17 




Getting in some first aid practice are, standing, Fire- 
fighters Gordon Frost (left), and Hobart King. The seated 
"victims" are, left to right. Patrolman Robert Rhodes, 
Patrolman Robert MacLeod, Firefighter Malcolm MacGregor 
and Fire Lt. Alan Pedersen. 



A# 




The ladder truck sees some action on January 8, 1966 
in a spectacular man-made blaze when the Fire Department 
burned Frank Putnam's chicken coop on Woodbury Lane at 
the owner's request. 



1967 PROGRAM 

I am asking for a new truck to replace Engine #5 which is now 21 years old and is no longer fit for a first 
line piece of apparatus. However, with a few minor alterations Engine #5 should be kept as a reserve piece, 
doing away with Engine #2 that is 33 years old. 

The sewerage disposal system at Acton Center should be replaced this year as it is inadequate to take care 
of the sewage. It has to be pumped out frequently and has given us a lot of trouble the last couple of years. 

The fire alarm maintenance work is now being taken care of by the permanent men. 

I am asking for one more man as I still find that I do not have help enough to take care of the duties that 
are now required of the Fire Department. 

Also I am asking for a full time Deputy Chief who will have the power to take over in my absence and also 
to assist me in the ever increasing workload. As I am retiring from office next November, the assistant should 
be put on as soon as possible so that he may take over at that tinne and run the Department until such time as a 
new Chief is appointed. 

The Buildings, Fire Alarm System and equipment are in good condition. 

In closing, I wish to thank the firefighters and Auxiliary for their cooperation in miaking miy job easier and 
in building up the Department to the high standard it has attained. I also wish to thank the several boards. 
Selectmen and clerical staff, who have contributed to the support and operation of the Fire Department. 

As I have mentioned before, my retirement is effective November 30, 1967 and in my 43 years as a mem- 
ber, and of that time 34 years as Chief of the Department, I can only say that I have enjoyed those years very 
much. Also I have enjoyed working with the several Boards of Selectmen and all other departments of the Town, 
the firefighters and residents of Acton. 

Again, may I say many thanks for the wonderful years I have enjoyed and wishing my successor the same 
enjoyments I have had. 

H. Stuart MacGregor 
Fire Chief 



STREETS 



I herewith submit the annual report of the Highway Department for the year 1966. 

Chapter 90 Construction . Work started early in the year to clear the 2,000 feet of new way on High Street. 
Some fifty trees had to be cut. We then hauled in 19,300 cubic yards of ordinary borrow which was compacted 
in 6 to 10 inch layers. Some fills were as much as 20 feet. There were 2,980 cubic yards of roadway earth 
excavation which had to be done to straighten the curves as well as 125 cubic yards of rock excavation in order 
to install the drainage and to lower the grade. Sixty feet of 18 inch pipe was used as a water equalizer. Once 
the drainage was completed we left the project for 90 days to allow for settling and compaction. 

In the fall 3,350 cubic yards of gravel borrow were hauled in as well as 2,200 tons of processed gravel for 
fine grading and rolling. The road was graded, rolled, and 3,800 gallons of oil was applied for a gravel binder. 
Eight hundred tons of Type I Bituminous Concrete were laid in place. Following this, 2,000 feet of guard rail 
was installed. 

Next spring the top course of Bituminous Concrete will be laid, the berms placed, and the slopes graded 
and seeded. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance. The following streets were resurfaced with an inch and a half of Type I Bitumin- 
ous Concrete: 

Central Street from Mass. Ave. to Nash Road (3,900 feet) 
Main Street from Taylor Road to Newtown Road (1,150 feet) 
Powder Mill Road (944 feet) 

Chapter 81 Maintenance . During the summer numerous streets were scraped, patched, swept, and then 
resurfaced with asphalt and sand. They included the following streets: 



19 



Arlington Street (3,800 feet) Liberty Street (3, 170 feet) 

Beverly Road (1, 160 feet) Maple Street ( 1,600 feet) 

Central Street (2,400 feet) stone cover Marian Road (1,200 feet) 

Chadwick Street (530 feet) Martin Street (3, 170 feet) 

Conant Street (1,700 feet) North Street (700 feet) 

Cross Street (500 feet) Notre Dame Road (1,200 feet) 

Elm Street (2,640 feet) Orchard Drive (1,700 feet) stone cover 

Ethan Allen Drive (1,300 feet) Parker Street (3,600 feet) 

Haynes Court (300 feet) Paul Revere Road (2,300 feet) 

High Street (7,000 feet) School Street (3,600 feet) 

Harris Street (3,960 feet) South Street (300 feet) 

Independence Road (1,900 feet) Spruce Street (600 feet) 

Kinsley Road (2,100 feet) Summer Street (4,800 feet) 

In addition, Hammond Street, Stow Street, and Robbins Street (650 feet) were resurfaced with mix-in-place. 

A surface treatment mix was applied to Concord Street and 450 feet of Spruce Street. 

General Highway. Minot Avenue, which is one of the Town's two remaining gravel roads, was regraveled 
and regraded. The other, Adams Street, was widened to a width of 24 feet for a distance of 850 feet and will be 
graveled in the spring. 

Cape Cod berm was laid along the east side of Main Street from Hayward Road to Route 2, and regular 
berms were laid from Newtown Road to Taylor Road. The regular berm was filled with loam and seeded. 

Most of the streets in Town were swept with our sweeper which has worked very well. 

Drainage. Drainage continues to be an ever increasing problem. As more and more homes are built, 
water which once ran off on to farm lands must now be diverted away. We now have some 975 catch basins 
which are cleaned once yearly. 

The various drainage projects in 1966 included the following: 

Piper Road: In the vicinity of Brucewood Road and Oakwood Road six catch basins and three 
manholes were installed. A total of 700 feet of 15 inch pipe, 180 feet of 12 inch pipe, and 
480 feet of 8 inch perforated pipe were installed. One hundred and ten tons of 1^" stone was 
placed around the perforated pipe. 

Hammond Street: A new culvert and 40 feet of 12 inch pipe were installed. 

Parker Street: Eighty feet of 12 inch pipe and one catch basin were installed in the vicinity 
of 216 Parker Street. 

Prospect Street: Two man holes and 650 feet of 12 inch pipe were laid to complete the drain- 
age from Hennessey Drive. 

Main Street and High Street intersection: One catch basin and 120 feet of 15 inch pipe were 

installed. i 

Charter Road: Two catch basins and 100 feet of 12 inch pipe were installed. 

Liberty Street: One catch basin and 160 feet of 12 inch pipe were installed. 

The final loaming, grading, and seeding of Spencer Road was completed. 

Signs and Lines. We are grateful to the Lions Club who again this year have donated the green paint for 
the crosswalks throughout the Town. The yellow and white center lines were repainted. The angle and parallel 
parking blocks were repainted as were the parking lines for the Town Hall, the Fire Stations, and the Police 
Station. 

Speed limit signs were installed on Parker Street and Taylor Road. Numerous other directional and warn- 
ing signs were also erected. 

This past year there has been more vandalism to street signs than ever before. Many were removed from 
the posts, others were smeared with paint, and others were bent all out of shape. 

Sidewalks. During the year the various sidewalks were repaired where needed. 

Care of Grounds. The Town grounds were maintained as usual. 

Disposal Area . Once again we note the ever-increasing use of this area. During the summer months the 
disposal area is open on Wednesday evenings, and this helps to lessen some of the load on Saturdays. 



20 



i 



It would be very helpful if the townspeople would put their trash in paper bags whenever possible rather 
than dumping directly out of a container. This would serve to keep the papers over the banking at the disposal 
area. 

Arthur Conquest continues to do an excellent job in maintaining the area. 

New Equipment. Our department acquired a new sidewalk plow during the summer. It has only been used 
twice but performed well in both storms. 




New Sidewalk Plow 



Snowblower Purchased in 1966 



The long-awaited snowblower arrived in late November. It has now been mounted on a surplus caterpillar 
tractor and is waiting to be used. 

We have also acquired a much needed used sander and a new Frink snow plow. 

Highway Department Garage. In May the Department moved down to its temporary home. Building #6 of 
the Haartz Company. It is a vast improvement over our old quarters and will allow the Town time to find an 
area which will be best suited for its needs. 




Used Sander purchased in 1966 and newly painted. 



The Haartz Building 



I wish to thank the Board of Selectmen and the various Town Departments for their assistance and cooper- 
ation throughout the year. 

Allen H. Nelson 
Superintendents of Streets 



21 



SIDEWALK COMMITTEE 



The Sidewalk Study Committee has met with the Board of Selectmen during the past year to decide on how 
the funds allotted to this Committee shall be spent. It was agreed by the Committee and the Selectmen that the 
Acton Highway Department be responsible for the construction and the maintenance of the proposed sidewalks. 

The priority for construction designated in last year's Town Report still remains the same and we hope to 
see the initial construction started this year. In this regard, an Article, calling for the appropriation of $2,500 
will again be inserted in the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting. 

Margaret M. Coughlan, Chairman 
Irene M. Rhodes 
Francis J. Schell 
John E. Dunphy, Jr. 



STREET LIGHT COMMITTEE 



During the 1966 year orders were placed for an additional 26 street lights making a total of 487 in the 
Town. In 1960 when this Committee was formed, there were 364 street lights. 

In several instances requests for street lights were not recommended by the Committee since the proposed 
location would aid only the petitioner and not materially affect the over -all lighting of the Town. 

We subscribe to the policy adopted with the formation of the Committee that new street lights, in most 
instances, will be installed only at street intersections, dangerous curves, fire alarm boxes and locations des- 
ignated as hazardous by the Fire Chief, Police Chief or this Committee. 

Our suggested budget for 1967 should not be exceeded unless there is unexpected industrial development in 
the Town. 

We extend our thanks to Mr. Byrd D. Goss for his service with this Committee and welcome Mr. Booth D. 
Jackson as a member. 

The Committee extends to the Board of Selectmen their sincere appreciation for their cooperation during 
the year 1966. 

Joseph F. Bushell, Chairman 
Leslie F. Parke 
Booth D. Jackson 



ENGINEERING 



The Engineering Department worked on numerous projects for the various Town Boards, Committees, and 
Departments during the year 1966. 

Work for the Board of Selectmen included: Drawing a plan and making estimate for granite curb around 
the Town Common, design and estimate for improvements of the parking lot behind the Center Fire Station, 
survey of Minot Avenue and beginning of plan for laying out Minot Avenue including drainage easements as re- 
quired, survey and plan for the improvements of the intersection of Charter and Hayward Roads, beginning the 
design of a new sidewalk from Taylor Road westerly toward Massachusetts Avenue, survey and preliminary de- 
sign of the proposed relocation of Hosmer Street just south of Route 2, survey and preliminary plan of drainage 
improvements for Central Street opposite Prospect Street, and lastly accompanying the Selectmen in perambu- 
lation of the Town bounds with Carlisle, Westford, Littleton, and Boxborough. 



22 



For the Planning Board work consisted of the following projects: assisted the Board in reviewing the plans 
of the eight subdivisions approved or modified during 1966. Inspections were made of all subdivisions under con- 
struction during the year. Nineteen roads were accepted by the Town at the Special Town Meeting, December 5th. 
We made a semi-final inspection of these roads, assembled. lists of work remaining to be done, wrote the Articles 
for the Warrant, wrote the orders of layout, and made a final inspection with the Planning Board. Also, all plans 
signed by the Planning Board were filed and indexed for future reference. 

The Board of Assessors received their Atlas revised and corrected to January 1, 1966. Work has been 
started on revisions through 1966. Additional help was given to the Assessors in solving various problems re- 
lated to disputed land ownership and areas. Sets and sheets of the Town Atlas, sold by the Assessors, were 
prepared and sent out to be printed. 

We continued drawing plans of and laying out burial lots in Mt. Hope and Woodlawn Cemeteries, as required 
by the Cemetery Commission. 

For the Conservation Commission, a plan was made of the Isaac Davis Trail easement as it crosses the 
Acton Center Woman's Club and the Church of the Good Shepherd properties. We also made sketches for apprais- 
al and evaluation of properties being considered for purchase by the Town for conservation use. 

The westerly line of Gardner Field was staked out for the Recreation Commission. It is now possible to 
locate the fence along the actual boundary line. 

Work for the Highway Department consisted of the following projects: Survey, plan, and stakeout of the 
drainage easement and new culvert on Liberty Street; layout and installation of two bounds on Nash Road at 
Central Street, and consultation on various drainage and construction problems. 

Work for the Building Committee involved staking out the property line of the Elm Street School land where 
it fronts on Arlington Street. We also inspected the culvert for Fort Pond Brook under Arlington Street. We 
concluded it was adequate and in good condition at present so no plans were necessary for replacemient. 

In addition routine work done by this Department included: Maintenance and updating of Town Street, Zon- 
ing, and Fire Maps; issuance and inspection of street cut permits; assisting the Building Inspector in assigning 
street numbers; and supplying various individuals with information about properties, roads, drainage, etc. from 
our files of plans and deeds. 

Our new office location at 69 Hayward Road has proved satisfactory, although we still find space somewhat 
limited. 

Charles Perkins has served as Engineering Consultant on a part-time basis during the year. Samuel 
Sutcliffe, a Professor of Engineering at Tufts University, was hired in October to work one day a week on spe- 
cific engineering projects. The Town is still without a full time Town Engineer. David Abbt continues in the 
Department as Engineering Assistant and has been effectively handling the management of the office on a full 

time basis. 

Charles A. Perkins 
Engineering Consultant 



PLANNING BOARD 



The Acton Planning Board had its usual busy year. We held 32 regular and special meetings, 4 joint meet- 
ings with other Boards, Committees and Commissions, 12 subdivision hearings, 9 hearings on zoning changes, 
and 1 hearing on the Building Bylaw. Citizen attendance at three of these hearings was most encouraging and 
rewarding. We hope this trend continues. 

In March, 1966, Charles Orcutt, Jr. returned to the Board after being elected to a five-year term. During 
this year, members attended the spring and fall meetings of the Massachusetts Federation of Planning Boards in 
Lexington and Framingham. Mrs. Donald Perkins also took a ten week course at Boston College entitled, "Local 
Planning and Zoning". Charles O'Neal continued as our representative on the Acton Advisory Committee on 
Water Resources, and Mrs. Perkins remains on the Town Administration Study Committee. 

Since the unfavorable vote in November 1965 on Recreation in a residential zone, we again submitted an 
article for the Town Meeting in June which contained both profit and non-profit recreational designated uses with 
specified control exercised by the Board of Appeals. This concept was also rejected. Trying the third time, 
the Planning Board eliminated the word, "profit", and some of the uses, when an article was presented at the 
December Town Meeting. After discussion, this article lost by an 8 vote margin. 



23 



The Planning Board had three articles voted on favorably at the December Town Meeting; namely, (1) Re- 
zoning from one acre to two acres, land in East Acton bordered by Concord and Carlisle, Route 2A and the 
Nashoba Brook; (2) Reducing the frontage requirement in the one-half acre and one acre residential zones to 80 
feet minimum if the required lot area was doubled; and (3) a new sign bylaw. 

The following subdivisions were approved after site examination and review of the plans by the Board and 
the Engineering staff: 

Pineoaks 5 lots South Acton 

Lamson Orchards 2 lots Acton Center 

Flint Acres 1 lot South Acton 

Eraser Park 13 lots West Acton 

Patriots Hill (Section III) 66 lots Acton Center 

Jenney Subdivision 1 lot Acton Center 

The Board approved changes in three previously approved subdivisions; namely. Azalea Park, Putnam 
Park and Barkers Pond Acres. Two definitive plans for subdivisions were disapproved for various reasons; 
namely, Manley Park and Assabet Valley Estates, Section I. The first set of plans of Patriots Hill (III) was 
disapproved and later changed to comply with our rules and regulations. In addition, we signed 55 plans which 
did not require subdivision approval. 

The Board is experimenting with so-called "Cape Cod" berm (curb) which has been constructed on Patri- 
ots Road in Putnam Park and Vanderbelt Road in Chadwick Park. The Highway Department will advise us con- 
cerning its usefulness. Also, in two subdivisions, Stonehedge II and Spring Hill Tract, we allowed an island of 
trees in the middle of the cul-de-sac. Another new idea has been tried in Stonehedge II. In order to maintain 
the rural characteristics of this subdivision of seven oversized lots, the subdivider was allowed to construct 
what appears to be an 18 foot road. Actually there is a full 24 feet of pavement, 6 feet of which is covered by 
loam and seed. 

Nineteen streets were approved at the fall meeting after periodic inspection by the Engineering Department 
during construction. The Planning Board then made a final inspection and recommendations were sent to the 
Selectmen for their approval. 

A compilation of the zoning changes in chronological order from 1953 to 1966 has been prepared by the 
Planning Board. This will be helpful to the Board in advising those who wish to subdivide land and others who 
seek opinions about land use regulations in the Town. 

There are several areas that we intend to consider this coming year. A review of the Master Plan (1961) 
with regard to the flood plain and the recent developments in the Hatch Act procedures is planned. Zoning and 
its effect on business and industry will be discussed with an endeavor to ascertain the citizens' opinions on this 
question and correlate it with the Master Plan ideas which may have to be updated. Several propositions for 
rezoning land to business uses have not met with approval by the Town. Perhaps the voters might be willing to 
adopt a general plan and then individuals who wish to comply with the plan would have their rezoning approved. 
Any suggestions in either of these two areas would be welcomed by the Board. 

The Planning Board is pleased that the townspeople voted to join the Metropolitan Area Regional Planning 
CouHcil at the December Town Meeting. This will enable our Town to benefit from their studies and receive 
state and federal funds when they are required. 

We shall continue to take an active part in submitting articles which we think are in the best interests of 
the Town. 

We wish to thank the various boards, committees, and departments of the Town. Our special thanks to 
Charles Perkins and David Abbt, Engineering Department, and Mrs. Arnold Woodward, our secretary, for 
their cooperation and assistance during the past year. 

David P. Tinker, Chairman 
Beatrice C. Perkins, Clerk 
Charles E. Orcutt, Jr. 
Charles D. O'Neal, Jr. 
Ellen C. Bryant 



ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 



The Trustees of this fund have signed orders to the Town Treasurer totaling $850. 

Hazel P. Vose Eleanor P. Wilson 

Helen B. Wood 



24 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



The Acton Board of Appeals held twenty public hearings during the year 1966 on the following matters: 

Petitions for permits for earth removal 
Granted 4; Denied 1; Pending 2. 

Petitions for specific uses and exceptions 
Granted 1; Denied 1. 

Variances from requirements of the Protective Zoning Bylaw 
Frontage requirements 

Granted 1; Denied 2; Pending 1; Petition withdrawn 1. 

Set-Back and side line requirements 

Granted 2; Denied 2; Petition withdrawn 1. 

Use and density requirements 
Granted 1; Denied 0. 

William C. Sawyer 
Herschel N. Hadley 
Hayward S. Houghton 



BUILDING COMMITTEE 



During the year 1966, the Acton Permanent Building Committee worked on the following projects: 

1. Elm Street Elementary School: The Elementary School was accepted as essentially completed in 
August 1966 and occupied for classes in September 1966. The final balancing and adjustment of 
heating and ventilating is progressing to completion. Punch list items are in the process of com- 
pletion. Landscaping will be completed in the Spring of 1967. 

2. Library Addition: The construction of the library addition will be completed in February 1967 
and the landscaping will be completed in the Spring of 1967. 

3. Cemetery Garage and Office : Working drawings were completed and advertised for bids in 1966. 
The low bid received was considerably higher than the Architect's estimate and all bids were 
rejected in the best interest of the Town of Acton. The working documents have been revised 
and advertised for bids. Bids will be publicly opened at the Town Hall in February 1967. 

4. Arlington Street-Spruce Street Elementary School : The Earl Flansburgh and Associates, archi- 
tectural firm, was hired to design the school. Working documents are progressing to completion 
and will be advertised for construction bids on January 26, 1967. 

5. The Building Committee- worked on several other Town projects during the year 1966 in coopera- 
tion with the Selectmen and other Town Committees. 

6. Frank L. Arms, resigned as Chairman during the month of December and Arnold H. Mercier, 
who had been clerk of the Committee, was elected as Chairman, and Frank H. Weatherby was 
elected as clerk. Richard L. Hodgman was appointed by the Selectmen to fill the vacancy caused 
by the resignation of Mr. Arms. 

Arnold H. Mercier, Chairman 

Frank H. Weatherby, Clerk 

Robert E. Sweeney 

Richard L. Hodgman 

Edwin Richter (School Committee) 

Parker Harrison, Jr. (School Committee) 

Marvin L. Tolf (Library Trustee) 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy (Cemetery Dept.) 



25 



LAND ACQUISITION COMMITTEE 



The Town Building-Land Acquisition Committee, authorized by Article 20 of the 1966 Annual Town Meeting, 
was appointed on May 10th. Responsibilities of the Committee as set forth in the Article are ". . . to study the 
space requirements of the various Departments, Boards, Commissions and Committees of the Town, to evaluate 
and anticipate the needs of the Town for buildings and land and to propose a coordinated program of acquisition, 
both general and specific, in order that there may be a planned growth of the physical administrative facilities 
of the Town." 

The Selectmen circulated a memorandum under date of May 27th, soliciting information and suggestions 
from Town officials. A publicity release appearing on May 19th explained the purpose of the Committee, re- 
questing information and ideas. 

The Selectmen requested that first priority be given to the problem of providing quarters for the Highway 
Department, removed from Acton Center due to the addition of the new library wing, and temporarily housed in 
the Haartz building on Hayward Road. The Committee has met with the Superintendents of Streets on a number 
of occasions to receive information and recommendations on the type of facility best suited to Highway Depart- 
ment use. A number of interested and informed citizens have also given the Committee the benefit of their expe- 
rience and advice. The Committee has, in addition, viewed Highway Department and Public Works buildings 
currently in use by other towns, and has solicited and received advice and comments from concerned officials. 
To assist in determining the most suitable location for this Department, the following criteria were established: 

1. A central location was considered as being desirable to facilitate service to the several areas 
of the Town. 

2. The site should be removed, in so far as possible, from residential areas to minimize the 
disturbing effects of noise incident to normal operation, for example, in the preparation 
and loading of salt and sand during winter storms. 

3. There should be a minimum of travel over residential streets in the dispersal of equipment 
to work areas. 

In addition, the Committee felt that a secluded location would be desirable from the point of view of general 
attractiveness of the Town. 

The Committee then made a detailed study of Town-owned land to determine if any such parcels met the 
criteria. Informative data relating to operational building and land requirements were taken into consideration. 

While no one of these considerations taken separately, seemed to point to a specific site, when taken 
together a location for the Highway Department in the area of the intersections of Route 111, 27 and 2 seemed to 
be indicated. The present temporary locale on the Haartz property was found to agree with the requirements 
noted above. However, this property was not for sale during the summer and early fall months. Other areas 
conforming to the above requirements were therefore considered. 

Having reached a preliminary conclusion in mid October, this Committee met with the Selectmen and a 
representative of the Finance Board on October 17th. At that time the following locations for a permanent High- 
way Department building were considered: 

1. The Haartz building (currently serving as temporary headquarters), together with a suitable land 
area, if upon inquiry this proved to be available at a reasonable price. 

2. Land only, to the rear of the Haartz complex of buildings, and as near Hayward Road as possible, 
provided that suitable arrangements could be made for egress onto Hayward Road. A portion of 
this land is the property of the Haartz Auto Fabric Corporation, with another portion belonging to 
Jenks Realty Corporation. 

3. Land only, situated across Hayward Road from the present temporary quarters. 

As a result of discussions with Mr. Haartz during October and November, it developed that he would be 
willing to consider sale of the building presently leased to the Town for the Highway Department, and a suitable 
parcel of land contiguous thereto. An appraisal of the property for the Town has been completed, and as a 
result of current discussions with the Haartz Auto Fabric Corporation, and investigation of other land in the 
general area, we hope to recommend to the Town at the Annual Town Meeting in March, a solution to the High- 
way Department building problem which will serve the present need and allow for future expansion. 

This Committee recommends that whether a Highway Department building is purchased or is newly con- 
structed it should also presently accommodate the Tree Department and the Engineering Department. We also 
recommend that such a building should be expandable on adjacent land, so that it may in the future provide for 
a Water Department, a Sewerage Department, and a Park Department (or a Buildings and Grounds Department), 
and should allow for further expansion for needs not now envisioned. 

26 



While it is not our function to present detailed specifications for these purposes, we do recommend that 
construction, appearance and facilities should be in keeping with the needs of present and future Town Depart- 
ments for efficient and economical maintenance of equipment, and should reflect due regard for the reasonable 
welfare of Town employees. 

While engaged primarily with the immediate problems of the Highway Department, your Committee has 
considered the future needs of other Town Departments and adnainistrative agencies with a view to recommend- 
ing a plan for orderly expansion. Implicit in the recommendation of a solution for the Highway Department 
problem, is the conclusion that future growth of administrative facilities should be in an area which is geograph- 
ically separated from the operating departments. 

As a step in determining such future requirements and location, a questionnaire was prepared and distrib- 
uted to a number of Town agencies. Replies have been received yielding information as to present usage of 
building space and facilities, and anticipated future needs. This information has been recorded in chart form, 
and has been preliminarily studied by this Committee to ascertain general trends which will influence further 
specific recommendations. 

We look forward, in accordance with the terms of Article 20, to concentrating our efforts in the coming 
months on the longer range planning for the growth of the physical administrative facilities which will be required 
by the Town in the future. 

Dana B. Hinckley, Chairman 
Edward W. Jones 
A. A. Morrissette 

Town Building-Land Acquisition Committee 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



The Town of Acton is continuing a steady growth rate consistent with the past several years. Total dwel- 
ling units this year is 208 as compared to 166 last year. It is interesting to note that 81 of these dwelling units 
are contained in 9 apartment buildings, representing an increase of 450 percent in multiple family dwellings. 

There were 132 applications for permits for alterations and repairs, residential garages, porches and 
private swimming pools for a total estimated cost of $254,470. This is in keeping with the trend of the past two 
years. 

A noticeable increase has been made for business and commercial permits. A total of 26 permits was 
issued, an increase of approximately 250 percent over last year, representing an estimated cost of $675,225. 
A partial list includes: 

Church Addition $180,000 

U. S. Post Office Building 75, 000 

Indoor Tennis Court 15, 000 

A complete list of permits for the year 1966 is listed below: 

Area No. of Permits Estimated Cost 

Residential 

Single Dwellings 137 $3, 235, 000 

Multiple Family Dwellings 9 Bldgs. - 81 Units 551, 000 

Additions, Repairs 71 157,800 

Garages 25 74, 470 

Porches 13 10, 250 

Swimming Pools 8 11,950 

Miscellaneous 15 67, 875 

Commercial 26 675, 225 

Municipal 

Addition to Acton Memorial Library 1 204, 959 

Total $4, 988, 529 

Receipts 
Fees for Permits $ 7, 690. 25 

27 



I am sorry to report that there have been more Zoning and Bylaw violations in the past year than in any 
previous year. Action has been taken in all cases and are listed as follows: 



Violation of Zoning h Building Laws 

Lally columns too far apart 

Wood timber too near fireplace 

Decayed boards in roof 

Fireplaces with 4" of brick behind header 

Houses occupied before occupancy permit issued 

Chimneys to short 
Illegal Earth removal 



Homes lathed and/or plastered before Inspection 

Porch roof without permit 

Pole barn (garage) built, no permit 
Business in residential zone 
Garage built, no permit, no footing 

Garage started, no permit 
Signs, no license 

House too close to street 

House too tall 
Remodeling, no permit 
Foundations, no permit 
Swimming pools, no permits 

Fireplace and chimney built, no permit 
Trusses not Engineer -designed 



No. 



Action 



1 




Corrected 


1 




Corrected 


.1 




Corrected 


2 


2 


Corrected 


16 


10 Corrected 




6 


Pending 


2 


2 


Corrected 


2 


1 


Permit Granted 
by Board of Appeal; 




1 


Stopped 


3 




Openings made 
for Inspection 


1 




Worked stopped 
until permit issued 


1 




Permit issued 


1 




Stopped 


1 




Piers installed 
Permit issued 


1 




Permit issued 


6 


2 


Licensed 




4 Removed 


1 




Permit suspended 
until corrected 


1 




Corrected 


1 




Permit issued 


6 


6 


Permits issued 


3 


1 


Pool removed 




1 


Pool emptied 




1 


Permit issued 


1 




Permit issued 
Corrections made 


1 




Work stopped 



Kenneth E. Jewell 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 



I herewith submit my report as Inspector of Wires for the year ending December 31, 1966. 

Three hundred twenty-six permits were issued. The sum of two thousand six hundred ninety-six dollars 
and 90 cents, ($2,696.90) was collected in fees for these permits, and turned over to the Treasurer. 

Leslie F. Parke 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS 



Total number of devices inspected - 179; sealed - 178; condemned - 1. 

Sealing fees collected and paid to Treasurer - $387.80. Uncollected fees - December 31, 1966 - $44.00 

Due to more rigid regulations imposed by the State Department on the testing of gas pumps, twice as much 
time is required than in the past. 

George K. Hayward 



28 



HEALTH 



WALDEN CLINIC REPORT 

The 1966 Acton Town Meeting approved a $4000 appropriation for the support of the Walden Clinic. A sim- 
ilar 40^ per capita will be requested this year. All of the participating communities; Concord, Lincoln, Carlisle, 
Maynard and Acton now provide their support with tax funds. 

During the 1965-1966 fiscal year the Clinic rendered over 1800 hours of professional service by psychia- 
trists, psychologists and psychiatric social workers. Thirty cases were referred from Acton during this period. 
Thirteen came from medical sources, six were self referred, five came from the schools and six from various 
other community sources. The children ranged in age from four to seventeen years. Two hundred ninety-two 
hours of Clinic time were devoted to Acton referrals and only Concord exceeded this amount of Clinic service. 

Fees are charged following a determination of the family's ability to pay. In 1965-1966 fees accounted for 
approximately 25 percent of the Clinic's budget. The remainder is derived from state support, local taxes, 
group and private contributions. 

The Clinic provides an essential health service and one that is otherwise difficult to obtain in this area. It 
is sponsored by the Walden Guidance Association in association with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Mental Health. 

MEDICARE REPORT 

The "Medicare" health insurance act for individuals sixty-five years of age and older went into effect as 
of July 1, 1966. 

The necessary requirements for Medicare certification were adopted by the state and since Acton provided 
the services of a Town nurse it also became incumbent upon our Board of Health to qualify as a certified Home 
Health Agency. Except for the services of a nursing supervisor and a physical therapist, the majority of these 
requirements were already a part of our program. 

In order to obtain these additional services, a Home Health Agency Committee was established by the six 
towns of Acton, Carlisle, Concord, Lincoln, Maynard, and Stow with the Home Health Agency of Emerson Hospi- 
tal acting as the parent agency. Each Town has a member on the General Advisory Committee which supervises 
the administrative functions and a physician on the Medical Advisory Committee. Dr. John S. Golden of the 
Acton Board of Health is Chairman of the General Advisory Committee. The services of a nursing supervisor 
and a physical therapist are now being contracted for through this Agency. 

The Committee applied for and received a federal grant for one year to help defray the costs of establishing 
and operating this combined Agency. 

Medicare prompted a cost survey which resulted in the establishment of a more realistic fee schedule in 
relation to the Town's cost. 

SEWERAGE SURVEY - CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS 



One of the more important tasks undertaken by the Board of Health during 1966 was that of analyzing the 
need for a municipal sewerage system. Previous Boards of Health had stated that there was a need and the 
Sewerage Study Committee, in response to a Town Meeting charter, reported in March 1966, that such a system 
could be built for approximately $10,000,000. The Finance Committee felt further evaluation was necessary and 
introduced an amended article charging the Sewerage Study Committee to coordinate such evaluation by all con- 
cerned Boards who would in turn report to the Town in March 1967 their findings. 

Essentially the Board of Health evaluation was undertaken in several areas: 

1. The existing Town Sanitary Code was thoroughly reviewed and revised as reported herein. 

2. Established in reviews with the Finance Committee that available failure rate data was inadequate 
and inconclusive. 

3. Determined that an educational program was necessary to alert the residents to proper care required 
for individual sewerage disposal systems. 

4. Concluded that only by conducting a survey of the sewerage systems in the Town could a realistic 
assessment be made of the need for a municipal system. 



29 



' A survey questionnaire was sent out to all residents on October 1, 1966. All concerned Town Boards and 

Committees had an opportunity to comment on the proposed questionnaire and some but not all suggested changes 
were incorporated. The primary purpose of the questionnaire was to obtain factual answers to specific questions 
leaving as little opportunity as possible for opinions. To this extent, suggested changes to the questionnaire were 
incorporated. 

The cost of printing, addressing, folding and stuffing 2800 questionnaires, envelopes, pamphlets and let- 
ters was $591. Two firms were contacted to obtain a competitive figure for this work and the apparent low 
figure was accepted. The funds used were contained in the Board of Health budget item hospitals and sanitarium 
expenditures which were not as high as anticipated. 

The Jaycees and Rotary were contacted to follow up on those survey forms not received after October 15. 

The Acton Boy Scouts and Girl Scout Troops 1, 3 and 4 were asked to assist the Board of Health on October 
22, 1966, in tabulating the received results of the survey. 

The Board of Health members and the Town agent each analyzed in detail and independently approximately 
one hundred survey forms (total 405) that indicated troubles or failures. Our tabulations form the basis of com- 
parison against the 1560 questionnaires that indicated no trouble has been experienced. 

A total of 2800 questionnaires were mailed out. As of November 1, 1966, we received back through the 
mail 1960. Four hundred five of that total have indicated some sort of trouble. 

Subsequent to the tabulation and initial review several recommendations were made to the Sewerage Study 
Committee by the Board of Health on 1 December 1966. 

One conclusion, that was unanimously formed by the Board of Health is provided in response to specific 
query from the Selectmen. The Board has concluded that there is no health hazard resulting from defective 
sewerage disposal systems in the Town above and beyond those normally caused by human habitation. There 
are numerous problems in varying degrees of non-compliance with the State and Town Sanitary Codes that re- 
quire corrective action. 

Not all of the 405 problems revealed in the survey require corrective action. Forty-seven percent indicate 
corrective action has been taken. The remaining 53 percent may or may not need correction depending on the 
extent to which the codes are violated. Our recommendations are aimed to accomplish two objectives. First, we 
suggest means must be devised to correct the more urgent existing problems. Second, we would hope to provide 
a more positive control and solution to the "sewerage disposal problem" for future construction efforts. 

Specific recommendations are as follows: 

A. That in recognition of anticipated population growth, realization of inadequacies and difficulties with 
present disposal systems, anticipation that more advanced disposal methods might not be available 
for some time, a municipal sewerage system is currently the only long-range solution to present and 
future problems. 

B. That all new State and Federal legislation passed in 1966 relating to sewerage plants and stream pol- 
lution should be evaluated and related to studies made by the Sewerage Study Committee and Finance 
Committee. 

C. That all concerned Boards and Committees support Article 11 included for action in the December 5th 
Special Town Meeting to insure inclusion in any sewerage or pollution control measures taken by the 
Metropolitan Planning District. 

D. That complete engineering drawings be accomplished for municipal sewerage works to insure subse- 
quent actions are taken in accord with such detailed plans. 

E. That action be taken to acquire land for a sewerage treatment plant. 

F. That a sewerage disposal improvement program be drawn up by the Sewerage Study Committee. Such 
a program should show progressive steps toward the acquisition of a sewerage plant and distribution 
system, the construction of which to begin no earlier than ten years from this date. The program 
should address itself to acquiring rights of way for construction, making provisions for an outfall line, 
making provisions for the use of package treatment plants if such can be used effectively, assisting 
builders in future sewerage system construction planning efforts. 

G. That all home owners be required to pump septic tanks once every two years. 

H. That any home owner with a suspected sewerage disposal problem contact the Board of Health for 
free assessment of the problem. 

I. That the Board of Health contract for engineering consultants to assess problems as required by 
home owners. 



30 



J. That provisions be made whereby a home owner with an assessed problem can apply to the Town 
for matching funds to correct the problem. 

. K. That as part of the improvement program but included in the Town Sanitary Code, builders be 
*'^ required to provide for future connection to a sanitary sewer main in addition to the sewerage 

disposal system on the lot. 

L. That an appropriate assessment be included in the Town Warrant to cover the cost of above engineer- 
ing plans, consultant fees, preparation of an improvement program, fees for right-of-way and funds 
for correction of current problems. 

ACTON SANITARY CODE 

On December 1, 1966, a revised local Sanitary Code including provisions of Article XI "Minimum Require- 
ments for the Disposal of Sanitary Sewage in Unsewered Areas" was adopted by the Board of Health. The major 
changes included: 

1. Relating the Soils Classification to that used in soils survey made of the Town of Acton. 

2. Increasing minimum size requirements for leaching fields and septic tanks. 

3. Establishing strict provisions for granting variances. 

4. Establishing additional requirements for pernaits and fees. 

jfif 5. Establishing strict compliance with percolation test requirements. 

6. Providing for more thorough investigation and testing of subdivision areas prior to approval. 

^ 7. Specifying conditions under which garbage disposers may be used. 

The provisions of the revised code have been reviewed with several of the reputable builders in the Town. 
The Board of Health feels that with strict and fair compliance with the provisions of the code, most of the sewer 
problems now facing home owners can be averted. 

ACTON SOILS SURVEY 

The Acton Board of Health has made the recent soils survey of Acton a part of its revised Sanitary Code. 
The revised Sanitary Code now requires that all new plans for sewerage disposal works must be related to the 
soils map information. 

Limitations indicated on the soils map and confirmed by site inspections must be considered and evaluated 
with respect to engineering plans submitted for approval by the Board of Health. The acton soil survey was 
made by the U. S. Soils Conservation Service in cooperation with the Middlesex Soil Conservation District. Their 
offices are now located in the Acton Professional Building at 403 Massachusetts Avenue, Mr. Fred Giebel, 
Director. 



SEPTIC TANK CARE 

Most of the water used in our homes only carries off wastes. Drinking, cooking, and washing the family 
car use less water than doing the dishes, bathing and flushing the toilet. Wastes carried away by water from 
kitchens and bathrooms are called sewage. Wherever possible, sewage should be collected in community sewers 
and carried away to a central treatment plant. In Acton septic tanks and underground leaching or absorption sys- 
tems are used. 

... (( 'ih[di ft-.^'-a.lv^ 




gBS^S^S^ } SCUM 




LIQUID 



SOLIDS 



Septic Tank 



31 



A septic tank system will serve a home satisfactorily only if it is properly located, designed, constructed, 
and adequately maintained. Even a good system which does not have proper care and attention may become a 
nuisance, and a burdonsome expense. 

To obtain satisfactory service, the homeowner must know something about the design, operation and main- 
tenance of his own septic tank system. 

Where it is impossible to connect to a community sewer, the home buyer should satisfy himself that his 
septic tank system is properly designed and constructed to serve the anticipated number of occupants of the 
house. He should also be sure that the system is located where it is not likely to endanger water supply systems, 
and that the leaching system, pits or tile fields, are capable of disposing of liquid wastes under year-round 
weather conditions. This information is available at your local health department. 

When septic tank systems are improperly designed or maintained, liquid wastes may overflow to the ground 
surface or the plumbing in the home may often be stopped up. 

The purpose of a septic tank is to treat household wastes, including soapy water from the laundry and the 
bath, discarded food scraps, and body wastes. The normal use of bleaches, detergents, soaps and drain clean- 
ers does not harm or interfere with the operation of the system. 

A septic tank is a watertight structure in which organic solids are decomposed by natural bacterial pro- 
cesses. The flow of sewage is slowed in its passage through the tank so that larger solids settle to the bottom 
and accumulate as sludge. Finer particles remain in suspension and pass through the tank. 

The bacteria present in a tank are able to thrive in the absence of oxygen. Such decomposition in the 
absence of air is called "septic," which led to the naming of the tank. Solids and scum are digested and reduced 
to a smaller volume by the bacteria in the tank. However, a residue of inert solid material remains which must 
■J^ be stored during the interval between tank cleanings. 

The frequency of cleaning depends on the size of the septic tank and the number of people it serves. When a 
garbage grinder is used, more frequent cleaning will be required. With ordinary use and care, a septic tank usu- 
ally requires cleaning every 2 years. The home owner can make measurements and decide for himself when his 
tank needs cleaning. When the total depth of scum and solids (see sketch) exceeds one -half of the liquid depth of the 
tank, the tank should be cleaned. The accumulated solids are ordinarily pumped out by companies that make a busi- 
ness of cleaning septic tanks. Your local health department knows which local companies do this work satisfactor- 
ily. The solids removed should be buried or disposed of in a manner approved by your local health department to 
avoid obnoxious odors and health hazards. 

There are no known chemicals, yeasts, bacteria, enzymes or other substances capable of eliminating or 
reducing the solids and scum in a septic tank so that periodic cleaning is unnecessary. Contrary to some beliefs, 
the addition of such products is not necessary for the proper functioning of a septic tank sewage disposal system. 

;^,"^ To facilitate cleaning and maintenance the homeowner should have a diagram of his septic tank system, 

" showing the location of the house, the septic tank manholes, the piping, and the leaching system. 

Septic tank and leaching systems frequently are damaged when heavy trucks or other equipment drive over 
them. An accurate diagram of the system enables the homeowner to keep heavy vehicles away from the critical 
'. area. A line of cast iron pipe instead of tile should be installed under any necessary crossings for heavy vehicles. 

Neglect of the septic tank, however, is the most frequent cause of damage to leaching systems. When the 
tank is not cleaned, solids build up until they are carried into the underground leaching pipe system, where they 
block the flow of the liquid into the soil. When this happens, the leaching system must be uncovered, cleaned, 
and relocated - a costly undertaking. The precautions of periodic inspection and cleaning of the tank prevent 
this needless expense and work. 

CLINICS. INSPECTIONS. PERMITS AND LICENSES 

Clinics No. of Persons Amount Collected 

Dental 125 $20.00 

Diptheria and Tetanus Immunization (Booster) 

Grades 1, 5, 9 and 12 513 

Tuberculin Screening Tests 508 

Grades 1 and 9 

$20. 00 

Communicable Diseases Cases Reported Communicable Diseases Cases Reported 

Chicken Pox 39 Infectious Hepatitis None 

German Measles None Measles None 

Gonorrhea 1 Meningitis 2 

32 



Communicable Diseases 



Cases Reported 



Comimunicable Diseases 



Cases Reported 



Mumps 

Salmonella 

Streptococcal Infection 

Syphilis 

Tuberculosis (Committed) 

Tuberculosis (Non-infectious) 



29 

2 

5 

None 

None 

4 



Other Cases Reported 



Animal Bites 



Total Cases Reported 



11 



93 



Chapter 111, Section 111 of the General Laws, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, requires that all communicable 
diseases must be reported to the Board of Health. Phone 263-473 6. 



Births: Premature - li. 



Inspections No. 

Food Handling Establishments 36 

Schools and Kindergartens 13 

Swimming Pools 9 

Slaughtering Inspections 

Nursing Homes 2 

Permits &: Licenses Issued 

Burial or Removal Permits 21 

Catering Permits 2 

Kindergarten & Nursery Schools 7 

Offal Transport 9 

Overnight Cabins & Camips 3 

Massage License 

Methyl Alcohol 6 

Milk Store 27 

Milk Dealers 10 



Deaths: Infants - 8; Adults - 45 



Permits &c Licenses (cont'd.) 

Total Collected for Misc. Items 

Plumbing Permits 

Gas Permits 

Sewerage Works Permits: 
New at $5. 00 
New at $25. 00 
Repairs & Alterations at $5. 
Total 

Total Collected for Sewerage 
Installer's Permit 

Town Nurse Services 

Nursing visits made totaled 1584; 
1056 of these visits were to people 
over 65. $1,285.80 was collected 
for nursing service. Medicare re- 
imbursement was $252.* 

Total Transferred to Town Treasurer 



No. 



Fees Collected 





$ 424. 50 


278 


2, 941. 00 


200 


1, 459. 50 


127 




31 




25 




183 


1, 510. 00 




25. 00 




1, 285. 80 



$7, 665. 80 



*Acton Board of Health was approved as a provider of Home Health Care Services as of July 1, 1966. 




(1. tor.) Daniel J. O'Connor, M.D., John S. 
Golden, D.D.S., George W. Moulton, Chm. 




Board of Health Members: 

George W. Moulton, Chairman 
John S. Golden, D. D. S. 
Daniel J. O'Connor, M. D. 

Board of Health Staff: 



Robert C. Heustis, R. S., Agent 

Dorothy James, R.N., Town Nurse 

Florence M. Ross, R.N., Asst. Town Nurse 

Nancy A. Gilberti, Secretary 

Paul P. Gates, M.D., Board of Health Physician 

Vance A. Carlson, D. V. M., Salughtering Inspector 

Joseph G. Perry, Plumbing & Gas Inspector 




Dorothy James, R.N., NancyA. Gilberti, Secy. 



Checking soils map data are (1. tor.): Al Gravlin, Doug 
Gravlin, Robert C. Heustis, Bd. of Health Agent, and 
Frank L. Arms, Building Committee Chairman 



33 



WELFARE 



Submitted herewith is the report of the Board of Public Welfare for the year 1966. 

Old Age Assistance: We have aided 32 persons under this category. 

Medical Assistance: This is a new category which replaced Medical Assistance for the Aged in September 
1966. Under this category all medical bills are paid. This is a very active category and persons or families 
are aided either on a sustained basis or else during periods of sickness. 

Disability Assistance: We have aided three persons under this category. 

Aid to Families with Dependent Children : Fourteen families with a total of forty-five children have receiv- 
ed assistance. 

The following is a detailed analysis of the expenditures of the Board of Public Welfare for the year 1966 and 
the estimated expenditures for 1967: 



Old Age Assistance : 



Medical Assistance: 



Disability Assistance: 



Aid to Families with Dependent Childrerl: 



General Relief : Three families and 2 persons 
have been given temporary assistance through 
this category. 

Recoveries under Old Age Assistance: 
Estimated Expenditures for 1967: 



Total Expenditures 
Federal Share 
State Share 
Acton Share 

Total Expenditures 
Federal Share 
State Share 
Acton Share 

Total Expenditures 
Federal Share 
State Share 
Acton Share 

Total Expenditures 
Federal Share 
State Share 
Acton Share 

Total Expenditures 
State Share 
Acton Share 









$39, 


055. 57 


$20, 


773. 


81 






12, 


784. 


69 


33, 
5, 

49, 


558. 50 
497. 07 

657.57 


24, 


346. 


25 






16, 


874. 


26 


41. 
8, 

15, 


220. 51 
437.06 

005. 25 


2, 


329. 


07 






9. 


113. 


07 


11. 
3, 

27. 


442. 14 
563. 11 

077. 30 


11. 


042. 


73 






9, 


025. 


79 


20, 
7, 

4. 


068. 52 
008. 78 

981.22 
196. 25 
784. 97 

742. 10 



Public Assistance - All Categories 
Salaries for Board Members 

Acton Share of Administration 



$60, 000. 00 
200. 00 

2, 100. 00 



Clinton S. Curtis 
Patience H. MacPherson 
Ivar Peterson 

Board of Public Welfare 



34 



SEWERAGE STUDY 



Bi-weekly meetings were held through the study and preliminary design effort of the consulting engineer - 
Metcalf and Eddy. After completion of their work and review, eight articles were prepared based on the recom- 
mendations of the report. Two public hearings were held to explain the preliminary design and financial plan for 
a sewerage system for the town. A special Town Meeting convened on June 6, 1966 to act upon these eight 
articles together with several other articles. The Committee prepared a report attaching the consultant engineer's 
report. The Town was required under provisions of the Federal funds advance for public works planning (Public 
Law 500, 83rd Congress) to submit the consultant engineer's report on or before 6 June; however, a 30-day 
extension was requested and granted. The contractor was paid $16,000.00 upon acceptance of the report by the 
Federal Government. 

The completed topographic atlas was placed in the Town engineer's office in reproducible form. This topo- 
graphic atlas replaced the previous Assessor's atlas. 

The several town boards, commissions, and committees, which have a vital interest in the sewerage dis- 
posal needs and requirements of Acton, met July 14, 1966 and September 15, 1966 to discuss the intent of the 
article proposed from the floor, and passed, at the Special Town Meeting on June 6, 1966. The various groups 
agreed to put their positions in writing by September 15th. This material was the base for the final report by 
the Sewerage Study Committee. 

Two of the committees, whose activities would appear to be affected to some degree by the construction of 
a sewerage system - School and Town Building-Land Acquisition, provided little comment. The former commit- 
tee reported that future building needs would be appreciably eased by a town sewerage system; no financial 
estimates were included, however, which reflected the magnitude of the impact on present and future school 
construction. The other committee decided that a detailed evaluation was not required at this time. 

The Conservation Land Trust submitted a detailed report which will remain on file with the Sewerage Study 
Committee. The Conservation Commission report recommended that if a sewerage system were constructed, 
consideration be given to maintaining the natural stream flows and topography. Such consideration was planned 
by the SSC and the design engineer. 

One town board, the Planning Board, unequivocally supported the need for some form of public sewerage 
disposal system for sections of West and South Acton along Fort Pond Brook. They recommended purchase of 
land for a sewerage treatment plant and also recommended certain zone controls to relieve or postpone problems. 
They also suggested package plants for certain applications. The Sewerage Study Committee wrote memorandums 
and discussed this point at some length with members of the Town administration, and no one had taken positive 
action and requested in writing approval from the State. This question was therefore directed by the SSC to the 
State Department of Public Health and the Department of Natural Resources. 

The Finance Committee performed a detailed analysis of the study prepared by Metcalf and Eddy. They 
found that if the sewerage system were constructed, the financial structure of the Town would stay within the 
safe limit of debt service, 15%. This finding included costs for a highway building, four elementary schools, 
and one junior high school with a financial reserve to cope with unforeseen small projects. The Committee 
raised certain questions on methods and inclusions of the M. &c E. cost estimates, which were discussed in a 
detailed memorandum. 

The Acton Water District believed that a sewerage system was not absolutely essential. They contended 
that the water supply should be returned to the local geological structure to preserve the water source. On 
November 3, 1964, the Sewerage Study Committee met with the Acton Water District (Mr. D. Loring) and Mr. 
Edwin Cobb, a Senior partner of Metcalf and Eddy to discuss this specific problem. Mr. Cobb reviewed the 
chemical analysis of water samples and stated there was no indication of local water going into the supply source. 
This subject was covered in some detail on Page 22 and 23 of the Metcalf and Eddy report. The water dissipated 
into the soil through individual septic systems was in the order of 1% of the average rainfall. 

The Health Board prepared a questionnaire to be completed by all townspeople. The compilation of the 
data was included in their report. Their further recommendations included postponement of the start of con- 
struction for ten years and corrections of existing individual system breakdowns. 

Further joint or intercommittee meetings are planned to resolve the questions relevant to each town com- 
mittee's scope of responsibility. 

Paul R. Nyquist, Chairman 
Robert H. Gerhardt 
Edward N. Patrick 
K. Gordon Platine 

Sewerage Study Committee 



35 



ii.rn'':i^ 




Acton's Educational Park which received national recognition in an article which appeared in the Septe 
22, 1966 issue of EDUCATION U. S. A. The numbers on the aerial photograph taken by Aerial Photos of Ne^ 
England refer to the following: 



1. J. L. McCarthy School 9. 

2. M. L. Towne School 10. 

3. F. A. Merriam School 11. 

4. Playgrounds 12. 

5. Acton-Boxborough Regional High School 13. 

6. Acton-Boxborough Regional Junior High School 14. 

7. Gymnasium 15. 

8. Track and Football 



Field Hockey 

Junior High Baseball 

Tennis 

Skating Rink 

Softball 

Baseball 

Parking Areas 



36 



SCHOOL REPORT 



ACTON SCHOOL DEPARTMENT AND ACTON-BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

ORGANIZATION 3 8 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 1967-1968 39 

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 39 

MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS , 40 

USE OF SCHOOL FACILITIES 40 

PROJECTED ENROLLMENTS 40 

AGE AND GRADE DISTRIBUTION TABLE 41 

ACTON FACULTY 41 

REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT FACULTY 43 

TEACHER RESIGNATIONS 45 

SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL'S REPORT ... 46 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL'S REPORT ... 47 

GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT REPORT 48 

SCHOOL PHYSICIAN'S REPORT 50 

SCHOOL NURSE REPORTS 50 

GRADUATION EXERCISES, CLASS OF 1966 51 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY MEMBERS 51 

CLASS OF 1966 52 

SCHOOL FINANCES 53 




The new Elm Street School which opened September, 1966 



37 



ORGANIZATION 



Acton School Committee 



Albert W. Koch, Chairman. . 
George E. Neagle, Secretary 

Parker Harrison, Jr 

''Thomas E. Wetherbee .... 

Edwin W. Richter 

Roy J. Zabierek 



Term Expires 

1969 
1967 
1968 
1968 
1967 
1969 



Acton -Boxborough Regional School Committee 

Term Expires 

Leonard E. Ceglowski, Chairman . . 1967 

Roy J. Zabierek, Vice Chairman . . 1969 

Parker Harrison, Jr 1968 

Joseph H. Hartshorn 1968 

Ruth F. Kennedy 1969 

Albert W. Koch 1969 

*Thomas E. Wetherbee 1968 

George E. Neagle 1967 

Edwin W. Richter 1967 



*Resigned in December 1966. Harry B. Morse was appointed January 3, 1967 to fill the vacancy. 

The Acton School Committee holds regular meetings on the third Monday of each month and the Regional 
School Committee meets on the second Monday. Both groups convene at the Acton-Boxborough Regional High 
School at 7:30 p. m. 



Telephone 



Superintendent of Schools, William L. O'Connell 

Administrative Assistant, Priscilla Felt 

Principals: McCarthy School, Alice F. Hayes 

Towne School and grades housed in Junior High School, James Palavras . , 

Merriam School, Carolyn T. Douglas 

Elm Street School, Robert C. Conroy 

Acton-Boxborough Junior High School, Arthur F. Hayes 

Henry J. Wall, Vice Principal . . . 

Acton-Boxborough Senior High School, Raymond J. Grey 

D. Alan Foresman, Vice Principal, 

Director of Guidance, Ruth R. Proctor 

School Physician, Paul P. Gates, M. D 

School Nurse, Acton Public Schools, Eileen Hale 

School Nurse, Acton-Boxborough Schools, Helen L. Rhodes 

Director of Cafeterias, Barbara T. Parks 

Attendance Officer, David W. Scribner 

Secretaries: McCarthy School, Dorothy Hansen 

Towne School, Maria Cranna 

Merriam School, Irene Heroux 

Elm Street School, Beverly Tyler 

Acton-Boxborough Junior High School, Mary Ott 

Barbara Primiamo 

Acton-Boxborough Senior High School, Main Office, Virginia Ott 

Principal' s Office, Dorothy Geno. . 

Guidance Office, High School, Phyllis Sutherland 

Guidance Office, Junior High School, Helen Cashell 

Superintendent's Office, Molly Johnston 

Cafeteria Staffs: 



263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 



5737 
5737 
4982 
2042 
2581 
2753 
7716 
7716 
7738 
7738 
2492 
5671 
4982 
7738 
7977 
2911 
4982 
2042 
2581 
2753 
7716 
7716 
7738 
7738 
2492 
7718 
5737 



McCarthy School: 
Merriam School: 

Elm Street School: 



Martha Lowden, Manager; Gladys Cady, Zita Jones, June Magoon, Marjorie Trebendis. 
Mary Tuttle, Manager; Patricia Adams, Ann Brown, Mary Nichols, Marion Osterhoudt, 
Reina Peterson. 
Evelyn Hill, Manager; Betty Belliveau, Eva Campbell, Alice Castelline, Meredith 
Lambert, Hazel O'Clair. 
Acton-Boxborough Junior High School: Anna D'ltalia, Manager; Emmie Corkum, Esther Davis, Laura 

Foote, Jean Galluzzo, Elizabeth Hanson, Edith Noftle, Rose Ramos, 
Christine Scribner. 
Acton-Boxborough High School: Meimi Fullonton, Manager; Margaret Brennan, Barbara Davis, Hannah 

Durkin, Myrtle Nihen, Pauline Polselli, Jean Smith, Ellen Tuomanen, 
Joan Vigliotti. 
Custodians: 

Head Custodian, Emery Nelson 

McCarthy School: John Conquest 

Towne School: Peter Smoltees 

Merriam School: Robert Graham, Thomas Kierce 

Elm Street School: Paul Richardson, Homer Reynolds 

Acton-Boxborough Junior High School: Peter Ryan, Elmer Gahan, Roland Wetherbee, Clyde Gurskey 

Acton-Boxborough High School: Russell Wolfe, Nathan Roberts, Edward Lowd 

Matron for Regional Schools: Alberta Knight 



38 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 1967-1968 



Reopening of all Schools 

Winter Recess 

Good Friday 

Spring Recess 

Memorial Day 

Graduation 

Close of School 

Summer Recess 

Teachers Meetings 
Reopening of all Schools 
Columbus Day 



January 3, 1967 
February 20-24 
March 24 
April 17-21 
May 30 
June 9 
June 20 



September 5, 
September 6 
October 12 



1967 



Teachers' Convention 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Christmas Holiday __ 

Reopening of all Schools 
Winter Vacation 
Good Friday 
Spring Vacation 
Memorial Day 
Graduation 
Close of Schools 



November 8 

Noon -Nov. 22 -23 - 24 

Dec. 24 - Jan. 1. 1968 

January 2, 1968 

February 19 - 23 

April 12 

April 15 - 19 

May 30 

June 7 

June 18 (183 days) 



NO SCHOOL SIGNAL 



1-1-1-1 
2-2-2-2 



7:15 A. M. 
7:00 A. M. 



No School Acton Public Schools, Grades 1- 
No School All Schools All Day 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



To the School Committees and Citizens of Acton: 

Herewith is presented my annual report as Superintendent of Schools for Acton and Acton -Boxborough 
Regional School District. 

Housing. Although two new schools were opened this year, one, the Regional Junior High, and two, the 
twenty-room elementary school on Elm Street, the need for classroom space for our children in grades 1-6 is 
urgent. At the close of the year on December 23, 1966 we had enrolled in the Acton Public Schools 2016 pupils. 
The two special classes are located in the Church of the Good Shepherd and six sixth grades are housed in the 
Junior High School. Presently we have a total of 64 classrooms. They are: McCarthy School, 12; Towne 
School, 12; Merriam School, 20; and the Elm Street School, 20. In order to have a ratio of twenty-five pupils 
for each teacher it would be necessary to have 80 classrooms, plus two rooms for our special classes. There- 
fore, an additional 18 classrooms are needed immediately. This does not take into account the normal increase 
from the close of school in June and the reopening in September. The second elementary school on Elm Street 
should be ready for occupancy in September 1968, when the enrollment will be 2100 for grades 1 through 6. 
Again, this does not allow for any transfers. It is because of this classroom shortage that the School Committee 
is working closely with the other Town Boards in looking at possible school sites. 

At the regional level, the high school with a capacity of 1000 pupils will have an enrollment of 1010 in 
grades 9 through 12 in September 1967. From the projected enrollments printed elsewhere one can see that two 
years from now in 1969 the high school enrollment will total 1241, or 241 over the capacity of the school. The 
regional School Committee is presently studying various land sites for a future secondary school. 

Cost of Education. The Massachusetts Teachers Association has sponsored House Bill No. 282 to increase 
the minimum salary for public school teachers to $5750., effective September 1967. The present $5000. mini- 
mum went into effect in September 1965. Both our local and regional budgets show sizeable increases over last 
year because of the opening of two new schools in September, 1966, as they reflect the staffing, maintaining and 
operating of these buildings for a full year. If the new state minimum becomes law, it would mean all salaries 
would have to be adjusted accordingly and the budgets increased. 

Chapter 763. An important piece of legislation which became law in February 1966 was the passage of 
Chapter 763. This act provides for the election of representatives bargaining agents with political divisions of 
the Commonwealth. This act will no doubt have a far reaching effect on all schools throughout the state. 

The Superintendent appreciates deeply the magnificent support he has received from so many. He and the 
School Committee have met with many of the Town Boards this past year, namely, the Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee, Planning Board, Recreation Commission, Land Acquisition Committee, Conservation Com- 
mission, Board of Health and the Building Committee. The cooperation of these Boards is sincerely appreciated. 

A special "thank you" to Thomas E. Wetherbee, member of the local and regional Committees for the past 
fourteen years, who resigned recently. The Town is fortunate to have had such a conscientious and loyal citizen. 
The many hours he devoted to the Town as a member of the School Committee cannot be measured. 



The Superintendent would like to thank those with whom he has worked so closely over the year. 
School Committee, administrators, teachers, and the entire school family. 

William L. O'Connell 



the 



39 



( MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS - 1966 , 

Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 

1. Completion of Educational Park - opening of new Regional Junior High School. 

2. Formation of "Liberty Project" with ten surrounding Towns' under Title III of Education Act. 

3. Appointment of full time librarian for Junior High School. 

4. Appointment of Vice Principal for Junior High School. 

5. Revision of Junior High School social studies curriculum. 

6. Selection of David Miner by American Field Service to study in South Africa in his junior year. 

7. Establishment of a varsity tennis team. 

8. Establishment of a varsity hockey team. 

9. Capital Outlay - painting of interior of original part of High School. 

Acton Public Schools 

1. Opening of twenty room elementary school on Elm Street. 

2. Hiring of Earl R. Flansburgh & Associates to draw up plans for second elementary school on 
Elm Street, occupancy September 1968. 

3. Formation of "Liberty Project" with ten surrounding Towns under Title III of Education Act. 

4. Extension of guidance program to grade 1. 

5. Hiring of additional physical education teachers to comply with Chapter 150, approved April 
18, 1966. 

6. Establishment of special class for trainable children. 

7. Capital Outlay - completion of third phase of rehabilitating Towne School, the replacement 
of all furniture. 

USE OF SCHOOL FACILITIES AND BLANCHARD AUDITORIUM 

The following organizations have used the Acton Public Schools, Acton-Boxborough Regional High School, 
or Blanchard Auditorium during the past year: Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, Community Center, Min- 
utemen. Square Wheelers, Firemen, Policemen, Lions Club, American Field Service, Veterans of Foreign 
Wars, Rotary, Little League, League of Women Voters, Friends of the Acton Libraries, Jaycees, Public Cere- 
monies and Celebrations Committee, Alumni Association, and various church groups. 

PROJECTED ENROLLMENTS 1967-1972 
Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 
Year Junior High (Or. 7-8) Senior High (Gr. 9-12) Total 

1967 663 1009 1672 

1968 691 1139 1830 

1969 701 1241 1942 

1970 750 1319 2069 

1971 767 1364 2131 

1972 773 1441 2214 

Acton Public Schools and Regional School District 

Year Grades 1-6 Regional School District Total 

1967 2060 1672 3732 

1968 2096 1830 3926 

1969 2123 1942 4065 

1970 2124 2069 4193 

1971 2150 2131 4281 

1972 2160 2214 4374 



40 



AGE AND GRADE DISTRIBUTION TABLE (OCTOBER 1, 1966) 



Pre-School 

Grade 1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 
Trainable 
Educable 



Entering Class of 
1972 1971 1970 1969 1968 
139 231 266 311 296 



10 
11 
12 

Acton Students Only 



1967 
310 



31 



10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 



298 


32 














46 


270 


36 


1 












39 


262 


39 


5 












42 


243 


37 


1 












30 


235 


39 


2 


1 










41 


218 


40 


3 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 










1 




2 






1 


2 



361 
353 
345 
323 
307 
302 
7 















Ele 


Tientary 


2006 


7 


204 


41 


7 










280 


1 


35 


203 


31 


5 


2 






277 






31 


157 


35 


2 






225 








24 


170 


29 


2 




225 










27 


120 


21 


1 1 


170 










2 


29 


104 


24 1 


160 



Regional School District 1337 
31 345 344 342 316 320 286 282 281 220 239 183 127 25 2 3343 
ACTON FACULTY 

William L. O'Connell, Superintendent 



Name 



Professional Training 



Degree 



Grade or Position 



McCarthy School 



Alice F. Hayes 
Clara Ballantine 

Margaret Connaughton 
Patricia Davis 

* Judith Dill . 
Helen Dooling 
Louise Harzigian 
Ann Jacobs 

* Karen Madaras 

* Marguerite Mazzone 
Lois Nicols 
Therese Scimone 
Sally Strangman 



Fitchburg State College 

Western Reserve University 

Boston University 

Lowell State College 

Lesley College 

University of Massachusetts 

Marymount College 

Lowell State College 

University of Minnesota 

Newark State College 

Boston College 

Lowell State College 

Boston College 

Rhode Island School of Design 

Lesley College 



B.S. 
B.S. 

M.Ed. 



Principal 
1 



S. 

S. 

A. 

A. 

S. 

S. 

A. 
B.S. 
B.S. 
B.S. 
B.F.A. 
MEd. 



James Palavras 

* Karen Anderson 
Dorothy Bunker 

* Janet Colburn 

* Malah Davis 
Helen de Coste 
Linda Desmarais 

* Patricia Higgins 

* Mary Hoyt 
Rayda Kinney 
Margery Lewis 

* Marygail Lynch 
Alice O'Hearn 



Towne School 

Boston University 
Fitchburg State College 
Elmira College 
Jackson College 
Lesley College 
Russell Sage College 
Lesley College 
Boston University 
Lesley College 
Lowell State College 
Oregon State University 
University of Massachusetts 
Lowell State College 
Lowell State College 



B.A. 

M. Ed. 

B.S. 

A.B. 

B.S. 

B.S. 



B.S. 
B.S. 
B.A. 
B.S. 
B.A. 
B.S. 
B.S., 



M.Ed. 



Principal 

2 
2 
.2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



*New Teachers as of September 1966 



41 



Name 



^Robert C. Conroy 

* Mary Donovan 
Angela Theodore 

* Judith Bongiovanni 

* Martha Collins 
'■'Rosemary Connolly 

Mary Denahy 
Eileen Gleason 
Carol Harvey 

* Lea Bartha 

* Stephanie Lambert 

* Rebecca Moore 

* Thalia Loosigian 
Mary Lou Parker 
Joan Roche 

* Barbara Sladkin 
*Rita Windheim 

Shirley Brown 

Susan Davies 
''•'Charlene Imbernino 
Madeleine Kingston 



Professional Training 



Degree 



Grade or Position 



Elm Street School 






Boston College 


B.S.. M.Ed. 


Principal 


Simmons College 


B.A. 


2 


Boston University 


B.S. 


2 


Beaver College 


B.S. 


3 


Boston College 


B.S. 


3 


University of Massachusetts 


B.A. 


3 


Emmanuel College 


B.A. 


3 


Lowell State College 


B.S. 


3 


St. Lawrence University 


A.B. 


3 


Lowell State College 


B.S. 


3 


Boston College 


B.A. 


3 


Duke University 


B.A. 


3 


Wheelock College 


B.S. 


3 


Fitchburg State College 


B.S. 


3 


Fitchburg State College 


B.S. 


3 


Syracuse University 


B.S. 


3 


Lowell State College 


B.S. 


3 


Lowell State College 


B.A. 


4 


Northeastern University 


M.Ed. 




Jackson College 


B.A. 


4 


Lowell State College 


B.S. 


4 


Fitchburg State College 


B.S. 


4 



Merriam School 



Carolyn Douglas 
Margaret Barrett 
Jennie Johnson 

Marlene MacLeod 
Janice JVIorgan 

* Mary Pirrel.lo 
Ruth Thompson 

* Lynne Alter man 

* Catherine Austin 
Joan Arons 
Camilla Chickerini 

* Pearl Gerber 
Nancy Joslin 

Nancy Lapham 

'■'' Sally Penney 
Sandra Sessi 
Sara-Ann Soracco 
Cynthia Natoli 
Barbara Parker 
Louise Piper 
Susan Shea 



Fitchburg State College 
Lowell State College 
Lowell State College 
Harvard University 
Boston University 
Fitchburg State College 
Framingham State College 
Lesley College 
Goucher College 
Western Michigan University 
Elmira College 
Lesley College 
Lesley College 
Mount Holyoke College 
Boston University 
Lake Erie College 
Boston University 
University of Massachusetts 
Muskingham College 
Boston College 
Elmira College 
Boston University 
Westfield State College 
Bates College 



B.S. 
B.S. 
B.S. 

M.Ed. 
B.S. 

s., 

S. 

s. 

A. 

A. 
B.S. 
B.S. 
B.S. 
A.B. 
M.Ed. 
B.A. 
M.Ed. 
B.A. 
B.S. 
B.S. 
B.S. 
B.S.. 
B.S. 
A.B. 



M.Ed. 



M.Ed. 



Principal 
4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 



Grades Housed in Acton -Boxborough Junior High School 



James Palavras 

* Joan Beck 

Geraldine Farrell 
='•' Julie McEnaney 
Nancy Nizel 

* Doris Peterson 

* Edwin Zwicker 



See Towne School 
Wellesley College 
Tufts University 
Emanuel College 
Lesley College 
Boston University 
Bridgewater State College 
Boston University 



A.B. 

M.Ed. 

A.B. 

B.S. 

A.B. 

B.S. 

B.S. 



Principal 
6 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 



SPECIAL FIELDS 



Ruth Proctor 
* Ada Cameron 



Radcliffe College 
Boston University 
Boston University 
Salem State College 



A.B. 
M.Ed. 
B.S. 
M.Ed. 



Director of Guidance 
Guidance 



42 



Name 



Professional Training 



Degree 



Grade or Position 



SPECIAL FIELDS (cont'd.) 



Marcia Falb 
Juta Moter 

* Janet Wrigley 
Constantine Limberakis 
Jeanne Haskell 
Arnold Radel 

George Revelas 

* Sharon Whitehouse 
Ann Geikie 

* Patricia Kinney 
Edward Leary 
Gladys Mason 

* Judith Gunner 
Richard Marion 
Phyllis Foss 
Agnes Manning 

* Suzanne Kissell 

Salvatore Lipomi 

*Nadine Yates 
Joan Hilton 



University of Florida B.A. 

Columbia University M.A. 

Wellesley College B.A. 

Harvard School of Education M. Ed. 

Bridgewater State College B.S., M.Ed. 

Boston University B. M. 

Anna Maria College B.A. 

Philadelphia Musical Academy B. M. 

Lowell State College B. S. 

State University, Potsdam, N. Y. B.A. 

St. Lawrence University B. S. 

Boston University B. S. 

Boston University B. S. 

Tufts University B. S. 

Tufts University B. S. 

Massachusetts College of Art B. S. 

Fitchburg State College B. S. 

Salem State College B. S. 

Stonehill College A. B. 

Lesley College M. Ed., Sp. Ed. 

Lowell State College B. S. 

Tufts College M. Ed. 

Washington State University B.S. 

Moravian College B.A. 



Guidance 

Guidance 

Guidance 

Director of Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 

Art 

Art 

Remedial Reading 

Remedial Reading 

Trainable Class 

Educable Class 

Speech Therapy 
French 



Arthur Hayes 



Henry Wall 

Judith Adams 
George Balf 

* Ruth Bernbach 
John Brodie 
Mary Campbell 
Robert Coan 

* Walter T. Cummings 

Helen Detsch 
Jeanne Dunlap 
-"''= Eleanor Feldman 
Joseph Flagg 

Merrie Foote 

* Anita Finkelstein 
Joan Goldthwaite 

'■'' Richard Gunzelmann 

Linda Harding 

Francis Holahan 

Bert Hubley 
-* Karen Jokissari 

* Ronna Kaplan 
Theodora Kelley 
Mason King 

Constantine Limberakis 
'■' Daniel Madden, Jr. 

* Christine Manning 
Juta Moter 

* Thomas Pecci 



ACTON -BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT FACULTY 
William L. O'Connell, Superintendent 

Acton-Boxborough Junior High School 

University of Mississippi B.A. 

Stanford University M. A. 

Harvard University A. M. 

Salem State College B. S. 

Boston University M. Ed. 

Marietta College B.A. 

Boston University B. M. 

Boston University B.F.A. 

Boston State College B. S. 

Immaculata College A. B. 

Boston College B. A. 

Harvard School of Education M. A. T. 

Massachusetts School of Art B. F. A. 

Yale University M. F. A. 

Boston University B. S., M.Ed. 

University of Connecticut B. S. 

Simmons College B. S. 

Mass. Institute of Technology B.S. 

Boston State College M.Ed. 

Colorado College B.A. 

Queens College of New York B. A. 

University of Massachusetts B.S. 

Fitchburg State College B. S. 

Boston University B. M. 

Fitchburg State College B. S. 

University of Massachusetts B. S. 

University of Massachusetts B. S. 

Boston University A. B. 

Simmons College B. S. 

Mass. Institute of Technology B.S. 

Harvard University A. M. 

Boston University B. M. 

Suffolk University A. B. 

Boston College M.Ed. 

Jackson College A. B. 

Wellesley College B. A. 

Harvard School of Education M. Ed. 

Boston University B.A. 



Principal 



Vice -Principal 

English 

Instrumental Music 

Art 

Science 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 

Art 

Librarian 

Home Economics 

Languages 

Mathematics 

French 

Mathematics 

Science 

Industrial Arts 

Music 

Industrial Arts 

Science 

Physical Education 

Languages 

Social Studies 

Mathematics 

Director of Music 
Guidance Counselor 

English 

Guidance Counselor 

Science 



43 



Name 

Pamela Pederson 
Ray Pillivant 

Ruth Proctor 

Arnold Radel 
George Revelas 
Lesley Robins 
' Julia Roberts 
Robert Rooney 
Beverly Sawyer 
Kathryn Schleicher 
Frank Soracco 
Albert Stonkus 
Margaret Thorpe 

Inese Wheeler 



Professional Training 

Saint Olaf, Minnesota 
U.S. Military Academy 
George Washington University 
Radcliffe College 
Boston University 
Philadelphia Musical Academy 
Lowell State College 
Vassar College 
Oregon College 
Boston College 
Framingham State College 
Goucher College 
Boston University 
Boston University 
Smith College 
Boston University 
Boston University 



Degree 


Position or Subject 


B. A. 


English 


B.S. 




M.A. 


Mathematics 


A.B. 


Director of Guidance 


M.Ed. 




B. M. 


Music 


B.S. 


Music 


A.B. 


English 


B.S. 


Remedial Reading 


B.S. 


Mathematics 


B.S. 


Home Economics 


A.B. 


English 


B.A., M.Ed. 


Science 


B.S. 


Physical Education 


B. A. 


Social Studies 


M.Ed. 




B. A. 


Social Studies 



Acton -Boxborough Regional High School 



Raymond J. Grey 
Alan Foresman 
Janice Bacon 

* Barbara Berenberg 
Charles Battit 

* Frank Blomberg 

Margaret Boornazian 
Frances Boyle 

Daniel Boylen 
Karen Briggs 

Robert Clever 
James Dadoly 

* Martha Deraney 
Geraldine DeFusco 
Thomas Dowd 

* Betty Drumheller 

* Gerald Duggan 

* Ann Duwe 

"'' Arlene Friedman 

Joanne Garduno 
James Gifford 

* Charles Gittins, Jr. 

* Pamela Green 
Estella Heitman 
Mary Keefe 

Constantine Limberakis 

* Patricia Luben 

Donald MacLeod 
Robert Mahoney 
Antoinette McAllister 
Lawrence McNulty 
Robert Morris 
Juta Moter 

* Richard Newell 

* Carol Olmsted 

* Nancy Ousley 
William Petkewich 

Jacqueline Phaneuf 



Tufts University 

Fitchburg State College 

Smith College 

Brandeis University 

Boston University 

Springfield College 

University of Massachusetts 

Burdett College 

Framingham State College 

Simmons College 

Boston University 

Duke University 

Vanderbilt University 

University of Illinois 

American International College 

Harvard University 

Boston University 

University of New Hampshire 

Harvard College 

Wellesley College 

Tufts University 

Salem State College 

Stanford University 

San Francisco State College 

Smith College 

Tufts University 

Radcliffe College 

Springfield College 

University of Massachusetts 

Salem State College 

Wayne State University 

Emmanuel College 

University of Pennsylvania 

Boston University 

Regis College 

Boston College 

Boston University 

Lowell Technological Institute 

Florida State University 

Boston University 

Boston University 

Wellesley College 

Harvard University 

Fitchburg State College 

Middlebury College 

Fitchburg State College 

Salem State College 

Boston University 

Lowell State College 

University of New Hampshire 



M.S. 
M.Ed. 



A.B., 
B.A., 
B. A. 
B. A. 
B. A. 
B.S. 
M.Ed. 



B.S. 

M.S. 

B.S., M.Ed. 

B. A. 

M.A. T. 

A.B., M.Ed. 

B. A. 

M.Ed. 

B.S., M.Ed. 

B. A. 

B. A. 

B. A. 

M.S. 

B.S. 

A.B. 

M.A. 

B. A. 

M.A. 

A.B. 

B. S. 

B. A. 

B.S. 

B. A. 

A.B. 

M.S., Ed. 

B. M. 

B. A. 

M.A. 

A.B., M.Ed. 

B.S. 

A.B. 

B. A. 

B. A. 

B. A. 

M.Ed. 

B.S. 

B. A. 

B.S. 

B.S. 

M.Ed. 

B.S. 

M.A. 



M.Ed. 
M.A. 



Principal 
Vice -Principal 
Mathematics 
English 
Science 
Social Studies 

Business 

Home Economics 

Physical Education 
Social Studies 

Guidance 

Head of Science 

Guidance 
Languages 
Science 
English 

Business 
English 

Languages 

Librarian 

Social Studies 

Science 

Business 

English 

Head of Mathematics 

Director of Music 

Languages 
Science 
Mathematics 
Languages 
Social Studies 
Head of Languages 
Guidance Counselor 

Industrial Arts 
Science 
Mathematics 
Head Guidance 
Counselor 

Languages 



44 



Francis Pratt 

Ruth Proctor 

* George Proulx 

* Barbara Quint 

Arnold Radel 
'''■ Francis Riley- 
George Revelas 

* Rebecca Roberts 

Phyllis Shaw 
Martin Sleeper 

Isadore Stearns 
Audrey Stein 

Ralph Stetson 
Frances Stonkus 
James Sullivan 

* Richard Terry 
Caroline Vattes 

* Alan Vigneron 

* Elizabeth Washburn 

Steven Wolin 
*Anne Wyckoff 



Eastern Nazarene College B. S. 

Howard University M. Ed. 

University of the Americas . M. A. 

Radcliffe College A. B. 

Boston University M.Ed. 

Saint Anselm's College B. A. 

Assumption College M. A. 

University of Michigan B.A. 

Harvard University M. A. 

Philadelphia Musical Academy B. M. 

Boston College B. S. 

Lowell State College B. S. 

University of Maine B. A. 

Harvard University M. A. T. 

Jackson College A. B. 

Williams College A. B. 

Harvard University M. A. T. 

University of Maine B. S. 

Barnard College, Columbia Univ. B. A. 
Teachers College, Columbia Univ. M. A. 

Northeastern University 

Emmanuel College B.A. 

Merrimack College B.A. 

Fitchburg State College M. Ed. 

Holy Cross College B. S. 

Massachusetts College of Art B. S. 

Columbia University M. A. 

Hobart College B. A. 

Boston University A. M. 

Wellesley College B. A. 

Harvard University M.A.T. 

Haverford College B.A. 

Boston College B. S. 



Head of Social Studies 

Director of Guidance 
Guidance Counselor 



English 
Music 

Mathematics 
Music 

Languages 
English 

Social Studies 
Physical Education 
Mathematics 

Industrial Arts 

Science 

Science 

Social Studies 
Art 

English 

English 

Languages 
Mathematics 



TEACHER RESIGNATIONS 



Acton Public Schools 



Name 

Comstock, Jean W. 
Donahue, Catherine F. 
Flint, Elizabeth A. 
FuUonton, Janice 
Goldman, Roberta K. 
Jones, Ann E. 
Keenan, Janet J. 
Maetozo, Anne 
Marcotte, Mary E. 
Pennington, Judith J. 
Rackow, Paulette 
Sacks, Helene R. 
Viano, Alice 
Wadsworth, Nancy 
Warman, Jean G. 



Grade 

3 

1 

2 

2 

Speech 

6 

2 

Phys. Ed. 

3 

Music 

5 

1 

3 

5 

4 



Reason 

To be at home. 

To accept position in Lexington. 

To accept position in Wallingford, Vt. 

To accept position in Colorado. 

To attend graduate school. 

To accept position in Chicago. 

Move to California. 

Move to Pennsylvania. 

To be at home. 

To join Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra in Holland 

To be at home. 

Move to New York. 

To accept position in Florida. 

Married, to live in New York. 

Move to California. 



Regional School District 



Adler, Stuart P. 
Baumann, Frances 
Bookbinder, Judith A. 
Brown, Eleanor S. 
Corbitt, Carol J. 
Gumming, William A. 
Mack, Judith A. 
Maetozo, Anne 
Meixell, Martha E. 
Modesitt, Anne A. 
Montague, Jean M. 
Rallis, Sandra 
Sullivan, James A. 

Terrell, Susan 
Tuller, Dorothy A. 



English 
English 

Art 

Guidance 

History 

Mathematics 

English 

Phys. Ed. 

Science 

Mathematics 

English 

French 

Science 

Latin 
Reading 



To attend graduate school. 

Move to Omaha, Nebraska. 

Move to New York. 

Married, to live in New York. 

Married, to live in Georgia. 

To accept principalship in Easton, Maine. 

To be at home. 

Move to Pennsylvania. 

To accept a non-teaching position. 

Move to Detroit, Michigan. 

To accept a position in the field of publishing. 

To attend graduate school. 

To accept a position as Assistant to Vice President 

of Lowell Technological Institute. 
Married, to live in Vermont. 
Move to California. 



45 



REPORT OF THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPA L 

The year 1966 represented a milestone in the history of the Regional School District. During this year the 
Junior High School was opened and this meant that the Senior High School housed grades 9, 10, 11, and 12. In 
September, 1966 we opened with 860 students. The previous year we had enrolled in the building 1562, this in- 
cluded some grade 6 pupils. The difference in numbers has improved working conditions tremendously. As a 
result we have initiated the following improvements in all departments: 

A. Science 

1. Increased the number of classes using the modern Biology series (BSCS). 

2. Physics - all classes using modern PSCS series. 

3. Teachers have but two preparations. 

B. Mathematics 

1. A full year Calculus course is now in operation. 

2. All classes have been changed to Modern Mathematics texts. 

C. History 

1. Mr. Francis Pratt worked during the summer months to revise the history department curriculum. 

2. All grade 9 students now take World History. 

3. Economics course added to program. 

4. Effective September 1967, a two year sequence of United States History and Government will begin. 

5. History Reading Room next to the Library opened. Students may go to this room for outside read- 
ing assignments or to take out these books for assignments. 

6. Teachers now have two subjects to teach thereby cutting down number of preparations. 

D. Languages 

1. Russian III class initiated. 

2. A Basic Spanish program started. In this program a student will complete three years of Spanish 
in four years. This enables students who have difficulty with the language to move at a slower 
pace in the first two years of the language. 

3. A Basic French program will start in the school year 1967-1968. 

4. We have initiated a class in French for students who have had no French prior to grade nine. 
This also helps students who transfer to our school from schools where no French was offered 
in lower grades. 

E. Business Department 

1. A meeting has been held with the Supervisor from the State Department of Education to formulate 
plans for a Federal project to improve the department. 

2. One additional typing room opened. 

3. One new teacher added to the department. 

4. Transcription course initiated for seniors. 

F. Mechanical Drawing 

1. Mr. Ralph Stetson appointed as full time mechanical drawing teacher. 

2. Four year sequence in mechanical drawing now offered. 

3. We will attempt to place some of our students in mechanical drawing departnnents with private 
firms during the summer vacation. 

G. Library 

1. Microfilm Reader purchased. 

2. Microfilms of magazines now being purchased. 

3. We have added 2300 volumes and 100 records. 

During the past year we have witnessed better use of films and film-strips by all departments. Overhead 
projectors and projectuals are being utilized by the teachers. The use of these audio-visual aids assists us in 
making our teaching more meaningful to the students. 

It is a pleasure to be associated with an excellent student body. We certainly appreciate their cooperation, 
spirit and attitude. I should like to extend my appreciation to Mr. O'Connell, Superintendent of Schools, and to 
the School Committee for their cooperation. My gratitude to the faculty, guidance staff, secretarial staff, cus- 
todians and cafeteria women for their efficient help in operating the school. 

Raymond J. Grey 



46 



REPORT OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

I am pleased to submit herewith my first annual report as Principal of the new Acton-Boxborough Junior 
High School. 

Enrollment School Year 1966 - 1967 

Grade 



September 


October 


November 


December 


January 


314 


310 


311 


313 


316 


309 


307 


310 


312 


312 



The curriculum for the Junior High School is designed so that a student, while acquiring the necessary 
fundamentals, may explore many areas of study and determine his strengths and weaknesses before entering 
high school. In many ways these are crucial years for it is here that proper foundations for higher studies must 
be built. The emphasis, therefore, is on reading, writing and arithmetic reinforced by modern books, equip- 
ment, and a well prepared faculty. There are no electives at this level so all students acquire some knowledge 
of art, music, woodworking, metal -working, mechanical drawing, ceramics, music appreciation, musicology, 
the proper use of a library, dressmaking, cooking, and physical education along with the academics. 

All students in Grade 7 are required to take English, arithmetic, science, geography, and French as part 
of their academic preparation. 

Students in Grade 8 are required to complete academic courses in English, history, mathematics, science, 
and French. Grade 8 honors students, those seriously preparing for entrance to good colleges take algebra, 
Latin, and Introductory Physical Science (IPS). The latter is a demanding science course that requires excellent 
reading and reasoning ability. These courses are in addition to French and the cultural courses. 

A. Languages - The new language laboratory makes it possible for students studying languages, ancient 
or modern, to develop a high degree of linguistic efficiency before entering high school. Two years of ALM 
French (Audio-Lingual Materials) are now available. This program emphasizes the listening and speaking skills 
inasmuch as language is first of all speech, and the ability to communicate by means of spoken words is of pri- 
mary importance. Students who are serious about their six years of French here and in the high school may 
enter college completely fluent in this language. 

B. Mathematics - Modern mathematics is now available to all students in Grades 7 and 8. Grade 8 honors 
students who are capable of doing so are enrolled in modern algebra. Students seriously deficient in mathemati- 
cal concepts are assigned to remedial classes which concentrate on fundamentals. Most students in the Junior 
High School use Mathematics 7 and Mathematics 8. These books are part of the Laidlaw modern mathematics 
series and are in sequence with progressively difficult texts until, if the student is mathematically inclined, he 
may take calculus in the High School. The new IPS science course ties in directly with mathematical studies 
begun in the Junior High School. 

C. Geography - The introduction of a new text, Sol Holt's World Geography and You has been completed. 
This text enhances beginning scientific studies by providing an accurate picture of the earth's human and physi- 
cal environment. It complements beginning earth science studies in Grade 7. 

All students in Grade 8 take United States History. The basic text is This Is America's Story, perhaps 
the best junior high school study now in print. The basic text is supported by readings from an excellent new 
collection. The Human Side of American History. 

A Social Studies Center has been established at this school. A generous federal grant has enabled us to 
acquire films, projection equipment, globes, maps, slides, overlays, tapes, records, replicas of statuary, 
coins, artifacts, and books for history and geography classes. The new center will enable teachers to show in 
depth the world we live in and how man developed into what he is today. 

D. Science - All students in Grades 7 and 8 take General Science based upon Volumes I, II, III, and IV 

of Science Problems. Honors sections in Grade 8 take Introductory Physical Science (IPS) a new, more demand- 
ing course designed to serve both as a solid foundation for students taking later courses in physics, chemistry, 
and biology and for those taking no further natural science in high school. The theme of the new IPS course is 
the development of evidence for an atomic model of matter. It is possible that some form of earth science 
course may be introduced for Grade 7 honors sections. 

General Science and Earth Science in Grade 7 is followed by Science Problems II and IPS for Grade 8. 
Thus a sequence of science courses is started that will lead the industrious student through Biology in Grade 9, 
Chemistry in Grade 10, Advanced Biology in Grade 11, and Physics in Grade 12. 

E. English - English classes at the junior high school level place much emphasis on reading, writing, 
spelling, and vocabulary. A new anthology. New Trails (Holt-Rinehart and Winston) is contemplated for Grade 
7. A companion volume. Wide Horizons, will be introduced in Grade 8. 

Students will read the following books along with their studies in grammar: Swiftwater. Call of the Wild. 
Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn, Greek Myths, Johnny Tremain , Captain Horatio Hornblower, Shane , and 

47 



Treasure Island. Emphasis on reading normally leads to a facility with words resulting in an improved ability 
to speak, read, and above all, write the English language correctly before attempting high school. 

F. Library - The student library at the Junior High School (capacity 82 seats) has a very large reading 
room and adequate shelf space. Two seminar rooms and a faculty library abut the main reading room. The 
student library has been fairly well stocked with reference volumes obtained under a Title II grant from the 
Federal Government. The main stock of volumes is now being ordered from funds provided by the townspeople. 

In time the faculty reading room will house a library of books on faculty subject areas and studies and 
periodicals in research on general education. 

The library is the nucleus of an Instructional Materials Center, the satellites of which are the language 
laboratory, a remedial reading room and an audio-visual room for the examination and showing of films. It is 
hoped that the Social Studies Center, the Instructional Materials Center, and the well-equipped Science Quad- 
rangle will result in better prepared junior high school students. 

G. Music - The Department of Music now has a large complex featuring a band room, a chorus room, 
office storage and practice rooms. The whole wing can open up into a small auditorium with its own stage and 
dressing rooms. Facilities available enable a serious student to take music as a major field of concentration. 
Courses in musicology, music history, and music appreciation are interlocked with vocal and instrumental work. 
The band and chorus combined in a superb Christmas concert. Both groups will collaborate again to put on the 
annual spring operetta, (April 28, 1967). 

Obviously none of these facilities would be available without the sympathy and backing of the Superintendent 
of Schools, Mr. William L. O'Connell, members of the School Committee, and the generosity of the townspeople. 

We are fortunate in having a well -prepared and dedicated faculty and I express my sincere appreciation to 
them. The guidance staff, the secretarial staff, the cafeteria staff, and the custodial group are all devoted peo- 
ple who have made it possible for this school to function properly. Lastly, it is a privilege to be associated with 
the excellent boys and girls who are students in this school. 

Arthur J. Hayes 
REPORT OF THE GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 



The "Decade of Progress", published a year ago as a report of the Acton-Boxborough Regional School Dis- 
trict, contained a capsule history of the Guidance Department in Acton from its inception in 1952. It included a 
statemient of objectives and an outline of activities, with emphasis on the secondary level. 

It may be well at this time to restate the objectives, for they are applicable to all levels in the school sys- 
tem. "The aim of guidance personnel is to provide insofar as possible for the adjustment of every student to his 
present school situation and for his growth in the direction indicated by his abilities and interests. Guidance 
services are not isolated from the total educational program; rather they are complementary to the other aspects 
of that program and their success depends upon the understanding and cooperative efforts of administrators, 
teachers, counselors, other staff members, parents, and students." 

1966 - Changes at the Secondary Level 

Although the organization of the school system did not change basically with the opening of the new Junior 
High School, certain changes in counselor assignments had to be considered for the sake of efficiency. It was 
no longer practical for each counselor to work with some students at both the junior high and senior high levels. 
Hence, it had to be decided which counselors would work most effectively with seventh and eighth grade students 
and which would function better with students in Grades 9 - 12. (Because of the way the school population is 
divided between the two schools this year, one counselor continues to spend a portion of his time at each building, 
but this is not ideal.) 

In order to maintain the State recommended pupil-counselor ratio of 300:1 for Grades 7 - 12, two additional 
counselors were named to the regional staff in September. 

To aid in the administration of the expanding program, Mr. William Petkewich, a member of the guidance 
staff since 1961, was named Head Counselor and given specific responsibility under the Director of Guidance for 
the supervision of the counseling program at the Junior High School and of the testing program at all levels. 
Further, he contracted to work on a twelve -month basis instead of during the school year only. 

Why Guidance at the Elementary Level? 

As the philosophy of education has changed over the years, so has the concept of guidance. In 1908, when 
Frank Parsons opened the Vocation Bureau in Boston, thus initiating guidance as an organized movement, guid- 
ance performed the limited function of providing assistance with vocational placement. Later, guidance programs 
began to develop in high schools, still with educational and vocational planning as their focus. In the years that 
have followed, guidance has taken on a wider concern, namely, that of helping youth with the typical problems 



48 



which they face at each stage of their growth. In the school setting, such problems occur in varying degrees as 
soon as children enter kindergarten or Grade 1. Guidance, then, should begin early and be continuous. 

Children. need to gain understanding, acceptance, and a'sense of responsibility regarding themselves. They 
need to grow in their understanding of education and of the world of work. They need to learn how to make sound 
choices and plans. They need to develop social attitudes and skills which will enable them to live in harmony 
with others. 

The concept of guidance is part of the philosophy of the modern elementary school, for teachers and other 
staff members are concerned with more than the child's acquisition of subject skills and facts. All aim to recog- 
nize the child as an individual and to help him feel his worth. All are concerned with the development of "the 
whole child." 

In the modern school, however, the classroom teacher cannot be all to everybody. Although he recognizes 
children as individuals, he must devote most of his attention to a group. Hence there is a need on the school 
staff for a specialist whose major concern can be the individual child. He can offer help within the school for the 
child with typical problems, and he can aid parents in seeking assistance from outside agencies for the child with 
special needs. 

Development of the Elementary Guidance Program in Acton 

Organized guidance services in Acton began at the secondary level, as was the case in most other Massa- 
chusetts communities. Guidance in the elementary grades, however, is not new, for even in 1952 when a Direct- 
or of Guidance was first appointed, this person acted in a consultant capacity with teachers, principals, and 
parents concerned with children in Grades 1-6. 

It was in 1960 that a counselor was first assigned, on a part-time basis, to the elementary grades and 
given specific responsibilities for counseling with students and consulting with school staff members and with 
parents. He did not see every child; rather, he saw only those children referred to him by teachers because 
they seemed to be experiencing some difficulties. 

Except for a brief lapse when a counselor was on a leave of absence, this kind of program continued, with- 
out additional personnel, until Septemiber of 1965. In 1964 the Massachusetts Department of Education had given 
impetus to the extension of guidance services on the elementary level by the publication of two brochures, 
"Guidance Services in the Elementary School" and "State Plan for Guidance and Counseling and Testing." The 
latter publication outlined in detail the requirements for guidance services, personnel, and facilities which must 
be met by local school systems if they wished to qualify for reimbursement under Title V of the National Defense 
Education Act. 

For September 1965, one guidance counselor had been appointed to work full time in the elementary grades 
to supplement the efforts of the person working on a part-time basis. Late in September of the same year, the 
School Committee approved a statement about objectives, personnel, and activities as drawn up by the Director 
of Guidance and entitled "Guidance Services and the Role of the Counselor - Acton Public Schools and Acton- 
Boxborough Regional School District." In essence, it followed the guidelines of the "State Plan" and recom- 
mended guidance for all children in the elementary grades according to specified pupil -counselor ratios. In 
order to implement this plan for 1966-1967, three additional counselors would have been necessary. Due to the 
lack of available qualified personnel, it was possible to appoint only two counselors for September 1966. 

Qualifications of Counselors, All Levels 



Although they have set more stringent requirements than those necessary for State certification, the Town 
of Acton and the Regional School District have succeeded in appointing as guidance counselors only persons who 
have had training in guidance and counseling at least to the master's degree level. (Several of the present staff 
members have had advanced specialized training beyond the master's level.) In addition, they have had teaching 
experience and they have acquired teacher certification for the grade level at which they are working. 

Activities, Elementary and Secondary 

Guidance activities are similar at both the elementary and the secondary levels and they may be classified 
in general according to the following categories: collecting and evaluating information about the student; coun- 
seling with the student; consulting with teachers, parents, outside agencies, participating in group meetings; 
providing educational and vocational information; offering assistance in placement; conducting studies and sur- 
veys; keeping abreast of current theories and programs in such areas as mental health, youth values and atti- 
tudes, curriculum, and remediable learning difficulties. 

It must be noted, however, that there are differences between the elementary and secondary levels in the 
points of emphasis and the degree of the counselor's involvement in the several activities. 

In the elementary school, the child is most concerned with the "here and now" and those working with him 
are aiding him in his immediate adjustments and current achievement. In the junior and senior high schools, 
while the same concerns are present, the student becomes involved also with making choices about curriculum 
and decisions about his future; therefore, those working with him must offer more assistance with regard to 
planning and placement. 



49 



At both levels the counselor sees every child during the school year and also confers with teachers and 
parents. It is probably safe to say, however, that at the secondary level the counselor's primary function is 
counseling with students, whereas one of the functions considered most appropriately as the major responsibil- 
ity of the elementary school counselor is that of consultant to teachers and parents. Here, the counselor helps 
the teacher in determining and providing for individual needs and talents within the classroom. He assists by 
interpreting behavior and discussing ways to effect changes in attitudes or environment. He helps parents to 
understand their child's adjustment and progress within the school setting. Counselor, parents and teacher 
work together to evolve home and school goals which complement each other. 

Conclusion 

Forward-looking school committees in Acton are providing facilities, materials, and well trained person- 
nel necessary for the development of a guidance program to meet the needs of individual students at all levels. 
Administrators and faculty members recognize the need for guidance counselors and seek their assistance. 
Many students, particularly at the secondary level, make appointments to see their counselors rather than wait- 
ing to be called. Parents of children at every level seek to confer with the counselors. 

The program for all children in all of the elementary schools is just beginning, but the climate seems to 
be good for its growth and ultinnately for a unified program for students in Grades one through twelve. 

Ruth R. Proctor 
Director of Guidance 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 

The annual physical examinations were completed in December. Physical examinations for those partici- 
pating in competitive athletics were conducted in August. Parents were informed of medical, orthopedic, and 
dental problems. 

In conjunction with the Board of Health, clinics were held for Tuberculin Testing, Diphtheria, Tetanus | 

immunization. ! 

t 

I wish to thank the townspeople, teachers, and school and town nurses for their cooperation and assistance' 

Paul P. Gates, M. D. 

SCHOOL NURSE REPORTS 

Acton Public Schools and Regional School District 

January 1966 through December 1966 

From January to June 1966, all schools were covered by myself and our medical secretary, Mrs. Larsen. 
Twenty -nine hundred forty-five vision tests were completed in all the schools. In March, 467 Tine Tests were 
completed in Grades 1 and 9 and the follow-ups were completed by the Public Health Nurse. 

Pre-School Clinic was held in April and 54 children were examined by Dr. Gates. Three hundred and two 
children were examined by their own doctors. 

Starting September 1966 to December 1966 I have made daily visits to the grammar schools, and visits ar( 
also made to the Special Classes held at the Episcopal Church. 

Physical examinations and hearing tests have been completed, and referrals have been sent to parents. 

Two hundred sixty-two Tetanus Toxoid "booster" innoculations were given to Grades 1 and 5, in coopera- ': 
tion with the Board of Health. 

I wish to thank all the personnel who have been so helpful to me during the past year. 

Eileen F. Hale, R.N. ! 

i 
Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 

September 1966 through December 1966 

Since September 1966, Dr. Gates has completed physicals on all candidates for competitive athletics, all 
students in Grades 7 and 10 and all new students. Parents were notified of any medical or dental defects. The 
total number examined was 448 at the High School and 393 at the Junior High. 



50 



i 



Hearing tests have been completed at the Junior High. All necessary referrals have been sent. 

Eye testing is nearly complete at the High School. 

In November, Diphtheria Tetanus Immunization was offered by the Board of Health to Grades 9 and 12. A 
total of 251 students took advantage of the clinic. 

Genuine thanks are extended to the administration. Dr. Gates, and Mrs. Larsen, whose help and coopera- 
tion have greatly contributed to a sound health program for the students of this community. 

Helen L. Rhodes, R.N. 
GRADUATION EXERCISES 



June 10, 1966 



Salutatorian: Marion Veenstra, Wellesley College 



Valedictorian: Susan O'Keefe, Brandeis University 



Acton-Boxborough Regional High School Alumni 
Association Scholarship: 

James Proud, Princeton 
Judith Cranna, Skidmore 
Sarah Tinker, Boston University 

Blanchard Memorial Scholarship: 

Diane Hodgdon, Bates College 
Eric Bye, Bates College 

Acton Center Woman's Club Scholarship: 
Willa Beddoe, McGill University 

West Acton Woman's Club Scholarship: 

Sarah Butler, Russell Sage College 

Acton Garden Club Scholarship: 

Beverly Abbt, University of Massachusetts 

Acton Parent -Teacher's Association Scholarship: 

Barbara McKee, University of Massachusetts 
Jon Jeffrey Kirkpatrick, Union College 

Acton Rotary Club Scholarship: 

Robert Newman, University of Rhode Island 
Barbara Panetta, Jackson College 

Acton Firemen's Association Scholarship: 

Brian Imhoff, Boston University 

Gail Moser, University of Massachusetts 

Acton Lions Club Scholarship: 

Philip MacPhee, University of Bridgeport 
Janice Merrill, Antioch College 



Acton Teachers' Association Scholarship: 

Saundra Lindquist, University of Massachusetts 
Carole Iskian, Boston University 

John E. Donelan Scholarship: 

Heidi Buxton, Boston University 

Irving S. Duren Scholarship: 

Donna Stevens, Bay State School of Business 

Acton Junior Chamber of Commerce Scholarship: 
Christopher Crighton, Bowdoin College 

Edwards Quimby Post No. 284 - 
American Legion Medals: 

James Proud, Princeton 

Gail Mosex, University of Massachusetts 

Harvard Club in Concord Book Prize: 
Robert Dee 

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School Medal for 
Science and Mathematics: 

Jon Jeffrey Kirkpatrick, Union College 

Bausch & Lomb Medal: 

David Stuart, Princeton University 

Daughters of the American Revolution Award: 
Gail Moser, University of Massachusetts 

Outstanding Senior of the Class of 1966: 

Gail Moser, University of Massachusetts 



NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY MEMBERS 



Grade XII 



Beverly Abbt 
Janet Allen 
Willa Beddoe 
Sarah Butler 
Heidi Buxton 
Eric Bye 

Jacqueline Cowley 
Judith Cranna 



Christopher Crighton 
Russell Dow 
Karen Hedin 
Diane Hodgdon 
Brian Imhoff 
Carole Iskian 
Howard Jones 
Jon Kirkpatrick 
Saundra Lindquist 



Barbara McKee 
Janet Merrill 
Gail Moser 
Robert Newman 
Paul Nyquist 
Susan O'Keefe 
Barbara Panetta 
Paul Parsons 



James Proud 
Robert Reichenbach 
Mary Schell 
David Stuart 
Sarah Tinker 
Marion Veenstra 
Bruce Warren 
Richard Weeks 
Lois Wetherbee 



51 



NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY MEMBERS 



Grade XI 



Leslie Bernard 
Thomas Bubier 
Jill Cranna 
Robert Dee 
Joan Driscoll 
Mary Glewwe 



Suzanne Hebert 
Catherine Holdway 
Karen Goeller 
Karen Gravin 
Arthur lodice 
Linda Koski 



Barbara Landell 
Cynthia Loring 
Linda Nyquist 
Beverly Perkins 
Scott Prentice 
Janet Romaine 



Claudia Schwarm 
Elaine Stanley 
Doris Suther 
Leslie Towne 
Pamela Veenstra 
Leora Wristen 



THE CLASS OF 1966 



Beverly Louise Abbt 

Donald Edward Allen 

Janet Louise Allen 

William Burke Allred, Jr. 

Ernest Kraftner Anderson, Jr. 
■Jonathan Hunt Avery 

Judith Titus Ballantine 

Linda Ann Barron 

Willa Mary Beddoe 

Jeffrey Buel Bezanson 

Dianne Marie Bleakley 

Ellen Isabelle Bryant 

Linda Suzanne Bursaw 
■ Susan Burt 

Doris Ann Butler 

Sarah Elizabeth Butler 

Heidi Jane Buxton 

Eric Anton Bye 

Edward Milton Cady 

David Sten Carlson 

Robert Charles Caron 

Paul Scott Charbonneau 

Glenn Conquest 

Linda Lee Coonradt 

James Bruce Coutts 

Jacqueline Beryl Cowley 

Judith A. Cranna 

Gordon Christopher Crighton 

Jeffrey Michael Cuff 

Carol Margaret Dadarria 

Alfred William Davis 

Karen Derby 

Linda Jayne Dertinger 

Grace Marie D'ltalia 

Russell Dow 

Paul Ivan Erik son 

Robert Hartwell Fiske 

Gayle Jeanne Flood 

Richard Palmer Ford 

Susan Marie Forrest 

Marcia Louise Frost 

Jeannette Frances Gibson 

Marilyn Eleanor Godfrey 

Eleanor Ruth Hall 

Judith Ruth Harbison 

Judith Mary Haynes 

Karen L. Hedin 

Beverly Louise Heiligmann 

Diane L. Hodgdon 



Suzanne Jane Hoey 
John Dennis Hollywood 
Brian Imhoff 
Carole Marie Iskian 
Leslie Ann Jeanson 
Christopher Jon Jewitt 
Linda Marie Johnston 
Elizabeth Anne Jones 
Howard FuUonton Jones, Jr. 
Virginia Marie Keene 
Ingrid Ketelaar 
Jon Jeffrey Kirkpatrick 
John Edward Knight 
Karen Elizabeth Krieger 
Donna Marie Larson 
Patrick Joseph Lawson 
Valerie May Lewis 
Saundra Joan Lindquist 
William Arthur Lounsbury 
Linda Jean Lowd 
John Thomas Lumens 
Donald Paul Mac Lean 
Philip Warren MacPhee 
Charles David MacPherson 
David Frank May 
Robert John McAuley 
Judith Ann McFarland 
Barbara Ellen McKee 
Alice Flourine McKenney 
Russell William McNamara 
Patricia Ellen McNiff 
Gerd Margareta Mellberg 
Janet Chase Merrill 
Craig Robben Morgan 
Bruce Alan Morrison 
Joan Karen Morrissey 
Joseph Patrick Morrissey 
Gail Ann Moser 
Gale Elizabeth Murdoch 
Bruce Alan Nadeau 
Harvey Nadeau 
Janet Rita Nedza 
Jon Arnold Nelson 
Robert Alwin Newman 
Gary Preston Noble 
Paul Robert Nyquist, Jr. 
Richard O'Dowd 
James Scott O'Dowd 
Susan Margaret O'Keeffe 



Stephen Barry O'Neill 
Dorothy A. Ordway 
John Edward Pacy 
JoAnn Maria Palazzolo 
Barbara Ann Panetta 
Paul Michael Parsons 
Edward Norman Patrick, Jr. 
Randall George Pederson 
Sylvia Jean Pillsbury 
Katharine Louise Pond 
Alan Rouse Poor 
James Richardson Proud 
Harry Ames Putnam 
Suzanne Elizabeth Rae 
Kathi Dianne Random 
Robert Edmund Reichenbach 
Beverly Ann Reynolds 
Joan Lois Rice 
Nancy Lee Robinson 
Kathleen Susan Roche 
Janet Frances Saaristo 
Mary Ann Schell 
Margaret Jean Simonds 
Pamela Whitcomb Sisson 
Sandra Smalley 
Susan Smith 
Donna Elaine Stevens 
» David Charles Strum 
David George Stuart 
Ellen Jean Sturtevant 
Sharon Lee Sullivan 
Kathleen Ann Sweeney 
Deborah Ann Tenney 
Robert Michael Thatcher 
Sarah Tinker 
William Philip Tremblay 
Ilonka O. Tumelaire 
Jennifer Lynn Tyler 
Cynthia Marie Elizabeth Vanaria 
David Russell Veasie 
Marion Barrow Veenstra 
Barbara Louise Vigliotti 
Bruce Parker Warren 
Richard William Weeks 
Lois Tolman Wetherbee 
George Brooks Williams 
Eileen May Wilson 
Denise Donna Witt 
Dennis Donald Witt 



52 



SCHOOL FINANCES - 1966 



Acton Public Schools 



Received - To the Credit of Schools 



State Aid for Public Schools, Chapter 70 $110,893.00 

State Aid for Transportation, Chapter 71 40, 835. 00 

Special Education, Chapters 69 and 71 7, 890. 00 

Federal Aid 22,321.00 



Appropriated, March 1966 $683,101.00 

Total Amount Expended from Appropriation $657, 721. 46 

Expended for Operation in 1966 

Instruction $527, 049. 64 

Plant Operation and Maintenance 73, 419. 44 

Non -Instructional Services 7, 124. 78 

Transportation 71, 768. 40 

General Control 15, 043. 34 

Contingencies 902. 91 



$695, 308. 51^ 



* Includes expenditures from appropriation and Federal Funds. Does not include Capital Outlay. 

Cost per Pupil (2006 as of 10/1/66) • $ 346. 57 

PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1967 
January 1 - December 31, 1967 

Acton Public Schools 
ADMINISTRATION 



School Committee $ 600. 00 

Salaries 20, 300. 00 

Conference Attendance 150. 00 

Expendable Supplies 250. 00 

Printing and Advertising 75. 00 

Magazines, Books, Dues 200. 00 

School Census 150. 00 

TOTAL ADMINISTRATION $21,725.00 

INSTRUCTION 



Salaries $643, 804. 00 

Substitutes 8, 100. 00 

Conferences 500. 00 

Textbooks 13, 309. 00 

Supplies 25, 765. 00 

TOTAL INSTRUCTION $691, 478. 00 

PLANT OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE 



Salaries $ 31, 280. 00 

Supplies , 5, 000. 00 

Fuel 10, 800. 00 

Water 850. 00 

Gas 2, 100. 00 

Electricity 10,225.00 

Rentals 5, 702. 00 

Telephones 1, 800. 00 

Maintenance - Equipment 3, 500. 00 

Maintenance - Buildings 6. OOP. 00 

TOTAL PLANT OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE $ 77, 257. 00 



53 



NON-INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 



Libraries 

Salaries - Health Department 

Eye and Ear Tests 

Health Supplies 

TOTAL NON -INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 

Music - Instruments and Equipment 
Office and Classroom Equipment 

TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY 

TRANSPORTATION 

Pupil Transportation 
Field Trips 

TOTAL TRANSPORTATION 
CONTINGENCY FUND 



2, 700. 00 

7, 200. 00 

400. 00 

200. 00 



1. 322. 00 
3, 075. 00 



78, 527. 00 
2, 000. 00 



$ 10, 500. 00 



$ 4,397.00 



$ 80, 527. 00 
$ 25, 000. 00 



SUMMARY 

ADMINISTRATION 

INSTRUCTION 

PLANT OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE 

NON-INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 

TRANSPORTATION 

CONTINGENCY FUND 



$ 21, 725. 00 
691, 478. 00 
77, 257. 00 
10, 500. 00 
4, 397. 00 
80, 527. 00 
25, 000. 00 

$910, 884. 00 



Acton -Boxborough Regional School District 
Received to the Credit of the District 



State Aid for Transportation, Chapter 71 
Federal Aid, P. L. 874, and P. L. 864, Title V 



sic 9fi 5l< sle sje sl< 



$ 43, 970. 00 
27, 908. 40 



Maintenance and Operation Budget, March 1966 
Expended from Appropriations and 12/31/65 Transfers 



$783, 664. 00 
$771, 199. 24 



Expended for Maintenance and Operation in 1966 



General Control 

Instruction 

Operation of Plants 

Maintenance of Plants 

Non-Instructional Services 

Transportation 

Miscellaneous 



$ 18, 515. 96 
591, 732. 26 
66, 965. 71 
30, 056. 45 
19, 307. 12 
58, 231. 60 
464. 67 



$785, 273. 77* 



* Includes expenditures from appropriations, transfers and Federal Funds. Does not include Capital Outlay. 
Cost per Pupil (1479 as of 10/1/66) $ 530.94 



54 



PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1967 



January 1 - December 31, 1967 



Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 



ADMINISTRATION 

School Committee 
Salaries 

Conference Attendance 
Expendable Supplies 
Printing and Advertising 
Magazines, Books, Dues 
School Census 
Related Insurance 

TOTAL ADMINISTRATION 



600. 00 
24, 600. 00 
150. 00 
500. 00 
75. 00 
100. 00 
150. 00 
240. 00 



$ 26, 415. 00 



INSTRUCTION 



Present Staff Salaries 
Additional Staff 
Substitute Teachers 
Conferences and Travel 
Related Insurance 
Data Processing 

Total Salaries and Related Expenses 



$700, 378. 00 

11, 800. 00 

4, 500. 00 

1, 100. 00 
7, 892. 00 

2. 825. 00 



$728, 495. 00 



Textbooks 

Art 

Business 

English 

Guidance 

Home Economics 

Industrial Arts 

Languages 

Mathematics 

Mechanical Drawing 

Remedial Reading 

Music 

Science 

Social Studies 

Supplementary Reading 

Total Textbooks 

Instructional Supplies (Specific) 

Art 

Audio Visual Aids 

Business 

Guidance 

Home Economics 

Industrial Arts 

Mechanical Drawing 

Mathematics 

Music 

Physical Education 

Science 

Social Studies 

Rebind Books 

Total Supplies (Specific) 

[nstructional Supplies (General) 

TOTAL EXPENSES OF INSTRUCTION 

3PERATION OF PLANTS 

Present Staff Salaries 

Additional Staff 

Supplies 

Fuel 

Water 



100. 00 
950. 00 
3, 790. GO 
300. 00 
125. 00 
200. 00 

3, 958. 00 
2. 536. 00 

225. 00 

325, 00 

211. 00 

2, 800. 00 

4, 042. 00 
600. 00 



1, 700, 00 

1, 100. 00 

670. 00 

1, 000. 00 

2, 000. 00 
1, 600. 00 

740. 00 

310. 00 
1, 890. 00 

900. 00 
4, 600. 00 

350. 00 
1. 400. 00 



$ 20, 162. 00 



18, 260. 00 
6. 000. 00 



36, 060. 00 
4, 100. 00 
7, 000. 00 

11, 000. 00 
800. 00 



$772, 917. 00 



55 



OPERATION OF PLANTS (cont'd.) 

Gas 

Electricity 
Telephones 
Related Insurance 

TOTAL OPERATION OF PLANTS 

MAINTENANCE OF PLANTS 

Instructional Equipment 
General Maintenance Equipment 
Replacements 
Outside Maintenance 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE OF PLANTS 

NON -INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 

Libraries 

Salaries - Health Department 

Eye and Ear Tests 

Health Supplies 

Middlesex County Retirement Assessment 

Insurance 

Related Insurance 

TOTAL NON -INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 



1, 250. 00 

12, 200. 00 

.3, 200. 00 

1, 175. 00 



2, 000. 00 

3, 000. 00 
3, 735. 00 
3, 575. 00 



10, 000. 00 

7, 200. 00 

200. 00 

350. 00 

6, 000. 00 

4, 450. 00 

312. 00 



OUTLAY 



Music - Instruments and Equipment 

Business Department 

Physical Education 

Library 

Office Equipment 

TOTAL OUTLAY 



5, 487. 00 
499. 00 
435. 00 
600. 00 

2. 610. 00 



TRANSPORTATION 

Pupil Transportation 
Field Trips 

TOTAL TRANSPORTATION 

SPECIAL CHARGES 

70% Blanchard Auditorium 1966 Operating Expense 

MISCELLANEOUS 



56, 974. 00 
1. 000. 00 



RECAPITULATION 



Administration $ 26,415.00 

Instruction 772, 917. 00 

Operation of Plants 76, 785. 00 

Maintenance of Plants 12, 310. 00 

Non-Instructional Services 28, 512. 00 

Outlay 9, 631. 00 

Transportation 57, 974. 00 

Special Charges 7, 250. 00 

Contingency Fund 25, OOP. 00 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION 



NON -CLASSIFIED, School Athletic Fund 
School Lunch Fund 

DEBT SERVICE 

GRAND TOTAL 

TOTAL BUDGET (GROSS) 



$1, 016, 794. 00 

12, 417. 00 
5, 000. 00 

290, 870. 00 



$1, 325, 081. 00 
$1, 325, 081. 00 



56 



Gross Operating Budget 



$1, 016, 794. 00 



Less: (1) Balance 1966 Operating Budget 

(2) 1965-1966 Transportation Reimbursement 

(3) 12/31/66 P. L. 874 Balance 

(4) 1967 Anticipated P. L. 874 

(5) 1967 Anticipated P. L. 864, Title V 

Net Operating Budget 



(12, 332. 41) 
(43, 970. 00) 
(22, 702. 90) 
(25, 000. 00) 
( 4. OOP. 00) 



$ 908, 788. 69 



Debt Service 
Interest 



Maturing Debt 

Less: Anticipated State Aid 

Planning Reimbursement 



210, 000. 00 
(136, 041. 00) 
( 20, 000. 00) 



80, 870. 00 



53, 959. 00 



Non-Classified 

School Athletic Fund 
School Lunch Fund 

TOTAL BUDGET (NET) 



12, 417. 00 
5. 000. 00 

$1, 061, 034. 69 



( ) 

Net Budget 



$ 264,046.31 
$1, 061. 034. 69 

$1, 325, 081. 00 



APPORTIONMENT OF THE CHARGES TO BE ASSESSED 
AGAINST THE TOWNS OF ACTON AND BOXBOROUGH 

Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 

Year 1967 



ACTON 



'■'Operating Expenses, 90.6% of 
Cost of Transportation 
Less Reimbursement (65-66) 
Debt Service, 95% of $134, 829. 00 
Non-Classified, 90.6% of $17, 417. 00 



396, 546. 69*=! 
50, 112. 00 
37. 870. 00 



$812, 271. 30 

12, 242. 00 

128, 087. 55 

15. 779. 80 



$ 968,380.65 



BOXBOROUGH 

* Ope rating Expenses, 9.4% of 
Cost of Transportation 
Less Reimbursement (65-66) 
Debt Service, 5% of $134, 829. 00 
Non-Classified, 9.4% of $17, 417. 00 



$896, 546. 69=' 
6, 100. 00 
6. 100. 00 



$ 84, 275. 39 

0. 00 
6, 741. 45 
1. 637. 20 



$ 92. 654. 04 
$1, 061, 034. 69 



Acton Student Enrollment 10/1/66 1340 

Boxborough Student Enrollment 10/1/66 139 

1479 

''Gross Operating Budget 
Less: 1966 M&O Balance 

1966 P. L. 874 Balance 

1967 Anticipated P. L. 874 

1967 Anticipated P. L. 864, Title V 

Combined Cost of Current Transportation Contracts 



$1, 016, 794. 00 
(12, 332. 41) 
(22, 702. 90) 
(25, 000. 00) 
( 4, 000. 00) 
(56. 212. 00) 

$ 896, 546. 69 



57 



ACTON -BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Treasurer's Report 
December 31, 1966 



Balance, December 31, 1965 

Receipts, 1966: 

Town of Acton $768,289.80 

Town of Boxborough 74,441.57 
State Aid -Construction 173,152.77 

Federal Aid 27,908.40 

Transportation Reimb. 43,970.00 

School Lunch 76,645.92 

School Athletics 3,523.95 

Federal Taxes 81,252.41 

State Taxes 10,401.28 

Teachers' Retirement 26,037.23 

County Retirement 3,616.83 

Teachers' Insurance 878.10 
Blue Cross -Blue Shield 7,183.66 

Group Life Insurance 604.80 

Acton Teachers Assn. 1,920.00 

Earned Interest 8,309.06 

Miscellaneous 2,887.97 

Total Receipts 



$ 657, 821.22 



$1,311,023.75 



Total 



$1,968,844.97 



Disbursements, 1966 

Maintenance & Operation 
General Control $ 16,850.61 

Instruction 590,710.66 

Operation of Plants 57,463.00 

Maintenance of Plants 20,037.73 

Non -Instructional Serv. 19,307.12 

Outlay 1,898.20 

Transportation 58,231.60 

Blanchard Aud. Lease 6,368.00 

Miscellaneous 464.67 

Construction 403,343.79 

Payment on Principal 210,000.00 

Interest on Debt 87,365.00 

School Lunch 80,755.01 

School Athletics 14,101.33 

Federal Taxes 81,252.41 

State Taxes 10,328.33 

Teachers' Retirement 26,037.23 

County Retirement 3,616.83 

Teachers' Insurance 878.10 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 7,193.98 

Group Life Insurance 604.10 

Acton Teachers Assn. 1,920.00 

Federal Aid 16,638.69 

Town of Acton 5,154.61 

Town of Boxborough 547.39 

Total Disbursements 
Balance, December 31, 1966 
Balance 



$1,721,068.39 
247,776.58 



$1,968,844.97 




New faculty members as of September 1966 with Superintendent of Schools William L. O'Connell 



58 



LIBRARIES 



When the doors of the addition to the Memorial Library open in 1967, the Trustees sincerely hope that the 
townspeople of Acton will experience as much a feeling of accomplishment and satisfaction as they do. 

The building itself grew through the year and our thoughts had to turn from construction to the complex 
work of outfitting and furnishing the interior. Plans had to be made not only for housing the more than 24,000 
existing volumes, but also to accommodate the increase of volumes required to keep up with the needs of our 
community in the future. 

The Trustees are extremely grateful to the staff and the public who have carried on under the most trying 
conditions. 

The Garden Club has again provided floral arrangements all year. These add color and beauty to the 
main reading room. The Christmas decorations were beautiful, and we appreciate the time and care that the 
members of the Garden Club take to make these arrangements for us. The Friends of the Acton Libraries con- 
tinue with their faithful support. 

Grateful acknowledgment should be made to the estate of Lydia Griffin for a gift of $500 in memory of 
Arthur F. Davis. 

The resignation of Dudley Howe was accepted with regret. Mr. Howe served on the Board for ten years. 

The citizens, librarians and Trustees have survived many inconveniences, heartaches and frustrations, 
the memories of which will disappear in the exciting months ahead. 

Marvin L. Tolf, Chairman Doris E. Peterson 

Hayward S. Houghton Margaret Richter 

Florence L. Merriam Raymond A. Shamel 

James L. Parker Earle W. Tuttle 

Acton Memorial Library Trustees 

LIBRARY HOURS: Monday through Friday, 1 - 9 P. M., Saturday, 10 A.M. - 6 P. M. 

STAFF: ^ Marian L. Piper, Librarian Frances Collins, General Assistant 

Marion M. Armstrong, Assistant Librarian Frances Livermore, Custodian 

Edna R. Custance, Children's Librarian Suzanne Shepard, Page 

ACCESSION: Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1966 24,054 

Increase by purchase 2,099 

Increase by gift 125 

Withdrawn 320 

Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1967 25,958 

CIRCULATION IN 1966: Fiction -40,949 Non-fiction- 21,967 

Juvenile - 37, 989 Total - 100, 905 

FINES collected in 1966: $2, 361. 88. 

REPORT OF THE CITIZENS LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF WEST ACTON 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES: Edward Boyden, Barbara Nylander, Chairman, Percival Wood, Secretary. 

LIBRARY HOURS: Monday - 7-9 P. M., Tuesday - 3-6 P. M., Thursday - 3-5 P. M. 
Thelma Hermes, Librarian 

ACCESSION: Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1966 6,319 

Increase by purchase 169 

Increase by gift 497 

Withdrawn 319 

Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1967 6, 666 

CIRCULATION IN 1966: Fiction - 1,722 Non-fiction - 1,555 Juvenile - 3.837 

Total - 7, 114 Circulation in 1965 - 6,432. 

RECEIPTS: Fines and Miscellaneous - $137. 38. 



59 



In 1966, circulation increased for the fourth consecutive year. Another room was opened for reference 
books. The walls, ceiling, and new bookshelves of the additional room were painted by volunteers from the 
Friends of the Acton Libraries. 

As a part of our new project to make the grounds more attractive, the Friends of the Acton Libraries 
supplied a fence which has been placed at the edge of the property, and the Town Tree Department supplied a 
flowering tree for the lawn. 

The Trustees and I wish to express our thanks to the staff of the Acton Memorial Library and the Friends 
of the Acton Libraries for their continued interest and assistance throughout the year, to the Acton Garden Club 
for a beautiful Christmas wreath, and to the many individuals who have given books and magazines to the Library. 

Thelma G. Hermes 
Librarian 



RECREATION 



Once again it is a pleasure to report that our summer recreation program has grown. Attendance has 
increased in all of our programs, and this has given us a great deal of satisfaction. Our staff this past year 
was the best one in our history. Because of their leadership and maturity, the playgrounds operated smoothly 
and efficiently. 

The Walker Junior Playmakers, a theater group from Burlington performed in Acton. An enthusiastic 
crowd of youngsters enjoyed their two puppet shows and one -act play. 

Family night held at each of our playgrounds proved to be very happy and fun -filled occasions as did the 
story hour again conducted by the Friends of the Library under the direction of Mrs. A. Lignell. The children 
were introduced to many fine stories and books. 

On August 2, f{alph Colson, State Supervisor of Health, Physical Education, and Safety came to Acton at 
the invitation of Robert Evans, our Summer Recreation Director. Mr. Colson gave a talk on physical fitness 
and showed films on swimming and diving and the 1964 Olympics. Over 125 children attended this event. 

The practice of traveling to other towns to compete in baseball and tennis was continued. Games were 
played against Concord, Bedford, and Hanscom Air Base on a home and home basis. 

The Bowling Program was held on Wednesday afternoons for six weeks with a substantial increase in 
attendance over the previous year. For a nominal fee the children could bowl, use bowling shoes, and receive 
instruction. 

The Twilight Basketball League attracted many young men for a very spirited season, but the event that 
showed the largest increase in attendance and interest was the Twilight Softball League. This league grew from 
four to nine teams and we expect a further growth this year. We are hopeful that there will eventually be two 
fields on the Elm Street land so that the shortage of playing fields for both the men and youngsters will be 
alleviated. 

Our tennis program was very successful. The classes were well attended and the courts were always in 
use. The program offered instruction to about 150 children. An increase for this coming year is a certainty. 
It is hoped that the voters will support the Recreation Commission in the construction of new tennis courts which 
the Town needs very badly. 

The Arts and Crafts Program continues to improve. Our Arts and Crafts Director, Mrs. Bonnie Kennedy, 
again amazed us with her ingenuity and initiative as was evidenced by the items brought home by the children. 
Further progress in this program is planned by improving the quality of the projects. 

This year we expect to complete our major acquisitions and just about complete our programs of equipping 
the playgrounds with the equipment necessary to run a complete program. We also plan to have a playground on 
Elm Street. The location is ideal for the Indian Village area of Town, and a playground there would draw a great 
many youngsters. This would partially solve one of our objectives which is to have our playgrounds where the 
people are. 

Our season ended on a sad note when a fire destroyed the shed at Jones Field where most of our equipment 
was stored. This resulted in the cancellation of the end-of-the -season Olympics which disappointed many chil- 
dren. 



60 



Again we would like to thank the Board of Selectmen and the Highway Department under the direction of 
Alan Nelson for their assistance this past year. 

Charles W. Pappas, Chairman 
William J. Phillips 
Alfred F. Steinhauer 
Myron M. Hnatio 
Margaret Coughlan 

Recreation Commission 



PUBLIC CEREMONIES 



This Committee has met regularly on the first Tuesday of each month plus many special meetings to carry 
out the observances of patriotic holidays. The highlights of these ceremonies are as follows; 

PATRIOTS DAY PROGRAM 

Acton's 1966 Patriots Day Program set a new record in participation and a new high in the national and 
international stature of its official guests: Dr. Kenneth D. Wells, President of Freedoms Foundation at Valley 
Forge, General Bruce C. Clarke, Vice -Chairman of the Board of Freedoms Foundation, and the United States 
Marine Band of Quantico, Virginia. 




Dr. Kenneth D. Wells, President, Freedoms Foundation, Valley Forge, Pa., 
addressing a group of townspeople at the Isaac Davis Homestead, April 19, 1966. 

A new Freedoms Area Community Program featuring a stirring patriotic address by Dr. Kenneth D. Wells, 
and a Review of Minuteman Companies from Bedford, Concord, Lexington, Stow, Sudbury, and Woburn and a 
color guard from the Acton Minutemen were initiated this year. The program took place in Concord on the Sun- 
day before Patriots Day. A reception in Concord and a dinner at the Wayside Inn honored our distinguished guests. 

Boy Scout participation reached a new high with over seven hundred scouts taking part in a Pre -Patriots 
Day Jamboree and Camp-out at Acton's Nashoba Gun Club. The scouts were thrilled with the program which 
opened with an Indian Fire-Lighting Ceremony, followed by "Flags of Acton Men" by the Acton Minutemen. An 
informal talk to the scouts by General Bruce C. Clarke, a hero of the Battle of the Bulge, NATO Commander in 
Chief of Armed Forces in Europe at the time the Berlin Wall was built, and recipient of Scouting' s highest award, 
the Silver Buffalo, highlighted the program. The finale of the program was the surprise appearance of The 



61 



United States Marine Band giving the scouts a wonderful campfire concert. The next nnorning over eleven hun- 
dred scouts hiked over the Isaac Davis Trail which is an official Historic Trail of the B. S. A. Leather Historic 
Trail Emblems were awarded to all scouts who qualified, and for the first time an Isaac Davis Trail Patch was 
made available to all scouts by the Acton Scouting Organization. Lt. Col. Burton Davis coordinated the scout 
activities. 

A Field Rations Dinner sponsored by the Daughters of the American Revolution at the Liberty Tree House, 
and a Reception at the Acton Woman's Club, sponsored by the Acton Lions Club gave many Acton people a better 
opportunity to visit with Dr. and Mrs. Wells, General Clarke, and other honored guests. 

The Captain Isaac Davis Ball, sponsored by the Acton Lions Club, was highlighted by an intermission con- 
cert by the United States Marine Band, whose opening number was Acton's own "White Cockade." The Marines 
closed their program with a thrilling rendition of "The Star Spangled Banner." The Acton Lions Club Patriots 
Award was presented to Raymond A. Shamel, Chairman of the Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee. 
The Acton Minutemen presented "Flags of Acton Men." Scrolls were awarded to Acton's distinguished guests. 

The Fifth Re-enactment of the Historic Dr. Prescott-John Robbins Ride took place at 1:10 A. M. following 
the Ball and concluded with a reception given by Mrs. Leo E. White at the Liberty Tree House, the 1775 home 
of Captain Simon Hunt. Dr. Samuel Prescott was portrayed by Seymour A. DiMare and John Robbins was por- 
trayed by William A. Rodday, II. 

The 6 A. M. April 19th program at the homesite of Captain Isaac Davis featured the remarks of General 
Bruce C. Clarke and the Patriots Day Address by Dr. Kenneth D. Wells, President of Freedoms Foundation. 
At Acton Center the newly organized Stow Minutemen and the patriotic marchers from Littleton joined in The 
Line of March of the Acton Minutemen. At the Old North Bridge, the 5000 marchers again heard "the shot heard 
round the world" which was fired there in 1775 by the Acton Minutemen, and then joined with those from sur- 
rounding towns in a patriotic program, featuring an address by Governor John A. Volpe. 

Acton's 1966 Patriots Day Program set a new record for enthusiasm! and attendance, as it has each year 
since the inception of the annual program in 1961. 

In addition Rev. David Hirano, Pastor of the West Acton Baptist Church gave the invocation. Mr. Norman 
Gilbert, Commander, American Legion Post #284, Acton, Mass. placed a wreath in honor of Captain Isaac Davis, 
followed by a prayer by Rev. David Cain, Pastor of the South Acton Congregational Church. The Acton Minute- 
men under the command of Col. Water Johnson gave a flintlock musket salute. The musical selections including 
the "White Cockade" were played by the Acton-Boxborough Regional High School Band under the direction of 
Constantine Limberakis. 

MEMORIAL DAY PROGRAM 



On Saturday afternoon. May 28, 1966 the Marching Unit of the Acton Minutemen and members of the 
Edwards -Quimby Post #284 American Legion gathered in the cemetery in North Acton to pay tribute to the 
Veterans and other citizens of Acton who are buried in that small but impressive cemetery. The invocation was 
given by Rev. J. Gary Campbell after which a wreath was placed and the Minutemen fired three volleys. 

On Memorial Day the parade formed on Alcott Street at 8:00 A. M. under the direction of Maj. Arthur P. 
Charbonneau as Marshal. His aides were Sumner D. Zimmer, Theron A. Lowden and Fred S. Kennedy. The 
following groups were in the line of march: The Colors and Color Guard, Edwards -Quimby Post #284 American 
Legion and their Auxiliary, Veterans of Foreign Wars of Acton, the Board of Selectmen, the Acton-Boxborough 
Regional High School Band, the Sergeant-at-Arms with Wreath Bearers, Veterans of the Army, Air Force, Navy 
and Coast Guard, the Acton Firemen, Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, Girl Scouts and Brownies. The parade was con- 
cluded with one of Acton's new fire trucks. 

At 8:3 the parade moved into Woodlawn Cem- 
etery where Rev. Justin Hartman offered the invoca- 
tion and a wreath was placed. The parade then 
moved on to Acton Center where Rev. Roger Wootton 
offered the invocation and wreaths were placed on 
the various monuments in honor of all deceased 
veterans of Acton of all wars. At approximately 
9:30 the parade boarded buses for transporting to 
South Acton. 

The parade re-formed in the South Acton Shop- 
ping Center and then moved on to Quimby Square 
where Rev. David Cain gave the invocation. A wreath 
was placed in honor of Pvt. Howard Quimby who was 
the first soldier to give his life in World War I. A 
detail of Acton Naval Reservists marched over the 
bridge to cast a floral spray into the waters of Fort 
Pond Brook as a token of memory to all Naval, 
Marine, and Coast Guard veterans from Acton who Memorial Day Observances 




62 



have given the supreme sacrifice. The parade proceeded to the South Acton Fire Station where refreshments 
were served to all marchers by the Junior Guild of the South Acton Congregational Church. 

Once more the parade was transported by buses to the Mt. Hope Cemetery where a wreath was placed and 
the invocation given by Rev. J. Gary Campbell. The parade then marched to Edwards Square arriving shortly 
before the noon hour. 

In Edwards Square the parade formed around the Mead Triangle and a wreath was placed in honor of Pvt. 
Sidney Edwards. At noon the flag was raised to the top of the mast followed by singing of the National Anthem 
led by Mr. Philip Morrison. A commemorative flag was presented to the Marshal. The invocation and bene- 
diction were given by Rev. Father John Donlon. 

At each of the five ceremonies three volleys were fired by a Firing Square provided by the National Guard. 
The hymns were played by the Acton -Boxborough High School Band and its members played taps and echo. The 
flags and geraniums were placed on the veterans graves by Fred S. Kennedy and the Acton Cemetery Depart- 
ment assisted by the Boy Scouts. 

VETERANS DAY PROGRAM 

The Committee cooperated with the Flag Burning Ceremonies of the Town of Concord at 7:00 A. M. on 
11 November 1966 in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery. Acton's Cemetery Department under the direction of Mr. T. 
Frederick S. Kennedy collected and presented for burning all of the flags from Acton's Cemeteries. The Acton 
Minutemen, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, members of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Acton Post, and Naval 
Reservists from Acton assisted in the very impressive ceremony of retiring United States. Flags by burning. 
Units from Concord who were present to assist in this ceremoney consisted of the Concord Minutemen, Ameri- 
can Legion Post, Concord, Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts and Naval Reservists. 

On Wednesday night December 7, at the regular meeting of the Acton Rotary Club in the Acton Congrega- 
tional Church three members of the Committee, Russell D. Hayward, Carl A. Hedin, and Percy W. Wood were 
honored to be able to present to Ormal "Sid" Laffin a flag for his many contributions to the citizens of the Town 
of Acton on patriotic holidays. 

In conclusion the Committee desires to express its sincerest appreciation to all of the residents of Acton 
not only for their support of the many activities of the Committee but also for the very valuable assistance that 
has been so freely given. Without this support this Committee would hardly be able to close out a very success- 
ful year of public ceremonies and celebrations. 



Clark C. McElvein, Chairman 
Russell D. Hayward, Clerk 
Carl A. Hedin 



Raymond A. Shamel 
Edward C. Warren 
Percy W. Wood 

Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee 



GOODNOW FUND 



INVESTMENTS 



Charlestown Savings Bank 
Concord Co-operative Bank 



Charlestown Savings Bank 
Concord Co-operative Bank 



RECEIPTS 



EXPENDITURES 



Treasurer of the Evangelical Church in Acton 
Town of Acton for the petpetual care of the Goodnow Lot in 
Woodlawn Cemetery 



$ 465.54 








3, 000. 00 


$3, 


465. 


54 


20. 34 








129. 39 




149. 


73 


129. 73 








20. 00 




149. 


73 



Thelma L. Boatman, Tr. 
Clark C. McElvein 
James N. Gates 
Trustees 



68 



REGIONAL REFUSE DISPOSAL 



The problem of solid waste disposal continues to receive serious attention at the national, state and local 
levels. The state-of-the-art in refuse disposal has not kept pace with the requirements imposed by the popula- 
tion growth throughout the country. The open burning operation in Acton will reach a cut-off point soon due to 
air pollution, and a solution must be sought beforehand. Neighboring Towns, such as Maynard and Bedford, 
have already reached a critical period. For the smaller suburban Towns, such as Acton, unilateral actions to 
provide long-term solutions may prove costly and prohibitive; therefore, any meaningful studies must include 
region-wide efforts encompassing several towns. A fiscal analysis of refuse plants points out a requirement 
for 50,000 population to be served by one plant. 

The Acton Refuse Disposal Committee, which was appointed by the Board of Selectmen early in 1966, con- 
centrated its activities during 1966 to research and study. The Committee participated with the Towns of Sudbur 
Concord, Maynard, Stow, and Lincoln in forming a Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Board -- with the Board 
being further subdivided into working committees representing (1) Plant Selection, (2) Site Selection, and (3) 
Admiinistration. Monthly meetings were held at alternate locations throughout the year, and the following areas 
were reviewed: 

a. Identification of problems confronting each town whose solutions could best be approached 
through a Regional effort. 

b. Three basic methods of disposal, i. e., composting, sanitary landfill, and incineration, to 
determine optimum value and disadvantages of each in both singular and regional application. 

c. Other techniques, such as the high heat Melt-zit plant presently in test status in Whitman, Mass. 

d. Federal Public Law 89-272 (89th Congress) dated October 20, 1965, which provides 80 million 
dollars of Federal funds over a four year period for research on solid waste and air pollution. 

e. State requirements relative to refuse disposal and for the formation of Regional Boards as 
provided in the General Laws, Chapter 10, Section 44A-44K. 

f. The Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Board studied a proposal by the Town of Waltham to 
establish a Regional Incinerator at the junction of Routes 128 and 20 whereby participation by 
interested towns would be on a pro-rated subscriber basis. 

The vote of the Town on Article 12 at the Special Town Meeting convened on December 5, 1966, indicates 
the Town's interest in continuing this investigation into the problems and methods of solid waste disposal. 

Paul R. Nyquist, Chairman 

H. Raymond Durling 

Edward N. Patrick 

Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Board 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



I herewith submit my report for Animal Inspector for the year ending 1966. 

Premises inspected 28 

Cows 66 

Young Cattle 77 

Bulls 1 

Beef Cattle 28 

Swine 

Sheep 8 

Goats 

Horses 56 

Dog Bites 41 

Dogs Quarantined 41 

Carl W. Flint 



64 



TOWN ADMINISTRATION 



The subject of administrative assistance, especially the Selectmen-Manager form passed by the Annual 
Town Meeting of 1965, was the dominant concern of the Town Administration Study Committee in 1966. 

We were disappointed that the legislature was not able to act on the enabling legislation in time to have a 
referendum on the March election ballot. After two postponements, a hearing before the Joint Committee on 
Towns was held on April 12. TASC prepared a brochure containing the history of the Selectmen-Manager Char- 
ter and letters from boards and committees expressing their approval of the bill. John Loring, Chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen, Walter Gates, TASC member, Mrs. Kenneth Stowell, President of the Acton League of 
Women Voters, Representative John Eaton, and Senator William Randall spoke in favor of the bill, H-2549, and 
one resident spoke against it. A favorable vote by the Committee on Towns was followed by the approval of the 
General Court and the Governor's signature. 

The bill had been amended to allow a referendum vote on the Selectmen-Manager charter in the November 
state election. The vote was as follows: 

Yes (in favor of Charter) 1, 663 
No (opposed to Charter) 1, 979 
Blanks 166 

Since this question will be on the March 1967 election ballot, TASC will again present information to the 
voters on it. 

Our recommendations regarding a site committee were expanded by the Board of Selectmen and submitted 
as an article for the March Town Meeting. We suggested the hiring of professional advice which was stated at 
the Meeting. The Town Building-Land Acquisition Committee article was passed. 

The Selectmen requested that TASC submit guidelines to prepare for a smooth transition from our present 
organization to the Town Manager form. This was done in rough draft and kept on file. 

TASC held an open meeting in October with the Town Manager of Danvers as speaker. TASC assisted the 
newly formed Citizens for Town Manager in the fall, by providing background information so they could inform 
the public about the town manager charter. Several nearby communities requested information from our com- 
mittee on town manager charters and talked with TASC members. 

TASC opposed Article 9 to authorize an Executive Secretary at the December Special Town Meeting. The 
Committee is not opposed to an Executive Secretary but the members preferred the Town Manager Charter. 

Chester Moody moved from Acton and the Moderator appointed Walter Gates in his place as member-at- 
large in February. Due to ill health, Charles MacPherson resigned in November. Mr. Gates was elected 
Chairman in May and Mrs.. Donald Perkins continued as Clerk. 

TASC held nine meetings, wrote articles for the newspapers, and met several times with the Selectmen. 
Since a final decision was not reached on the Selectmen-Manager Charter or other administrative assistance for 
the Board of Selectmen during 1966, we shall continue our efforts to improve the administrative organization of 
the Town of Acton. 

Walter B. Gates, Chairman 
Beatrice C. Perkins, Clerk 
Charles C. Grandy 
Clyde J. Home 

Town Administration Study Committee 



TOWN FOREST 



This year the boundaries of both Town Forests were cleared of brush and trees. All corner bounds and line 
trees were painted with fluorescent paint. The fire lanes in the Durkee lot were cleared of brush and fallen trees. 

Franklin H. Charter 
Arno H. Perkins 
Emery Nelson 

Town Forest Committee 

65 



TREE WARDEN 



Our tree planting program was started in April and 75 trees were planted. Several different varieties 
were planted for the first time. We continue to plant most of our trees well back from the street. 

About 100 structurally weak or diseased trees were removed from the roadside this year. The recent 
drought and grade changes have weakened many of the older trees. 

Franklin H. Charter 



INSECT PEST CONTROL 



This year 53 trees infected with Dutch Elm Disease were removed. A foliage spray was applied for leaf 
eating insects in late June. Gypsy and Brown Tail Moths are no longer as large a problem as previously and 
the nanne of the department has been legally changed to the Department of Insect Pest Control. The control of 
eleven insects, two diseases and the eradication of Poison Ivy are our principal activities. 

Franklin H. Charter 
Superintendent 



ARCHIVES 



During the year the Committee has met several times and for the most part the work of this Committee 
has been of a routine nature - compiling records and papers. 

Also the past year this Comnnittee has received a great many letters, requesting information in regard to 
the history of the Town, the names and history of some of the older families that used to live here. 

The Committee is planning after the first of the year to do some more microfilming of the present Town 
records. 

Frederick S. Kennedy 
Joyce C. Woodhead 
David L. May 

Archives Committee 



CEMETERY 



Besides the routine maintenance of the cemeteries, several projects were completed this past year. 
Through the fine efforts of the Engineering Department, we were able to lay out roads and three new sections 
for graves and lots. There were some other projects that we could not complete due to the shortage of labor 
available; these we hope to do this coming year. 

For the past several years we have been able to obtain part time help from the Veteran's Hospital in Bed- 
ford, Mass. Now many large industries are beginning to hire these men, and this source of part-time help may 

66 



not be available in 1967. 
year round job today. 



It looks as if the days of hiring part-time help has past since every person wants a 



This past year there have been several cases of vandalism in the cemeteries - eggs thrown at expensive 
monuments (the stains cannot be removed), flags and flag standards removed or broken, windows and electric 
meters broken and other acts of vandalism committed. Perhaps the parties that committed these acts fail to 
realize that there is a heavy penalty under the law for anyone caught doing any vandalism in any cemetery. 

In view of these acts of vandalism the Commissioners have decided to close the cemetery gates at the 
close of the working day, to try to prevent any further damage. 

We have several projects planned for the coming year. We plan to make some improvements in the front 
part of Mt. Hope, to do some landscaping in the new part of this cemetery, and also to make some improvements 
in the North Acton cemetery. We also intend to continue the program of hot topping the roads in Woodlawn 
Cemetery. 

At this time the Commissioners would like to express their thanks and appreciation to the several depart- 
ments for their help and cooperation and also to all the employees of this department for their fine cooperation. 





The Chapel in Woodlawn Cemetery 



Site of the new Cemetery Department 
building in Woodlawn Cemetery. 



Harlan E. Tuttle 
Howard F. Jones 
Donald O. Nylander 

Cemetery Commissioners 



VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 



There have been 'four interments of United States war veterans in the Acton cemeteries during the year 
1966. The names of the veterans, the dates and place of burial are as follows: 



Guy E. Boodry 
Samuel Freeman 
James L. Dugan 
t^ Glenn C. Gould 



W.W. I 

Spanish American War 

W.W. II 

W.W. I 



April 26, 1966 

July 7, 1966 

May 7, 1966 

Oct. 31, 1966 



Woodlawn Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Mt. Hope Cemetery 



Veterans Flag Standards have been placed on the graves of these departed veterans. Last fall some teen- 
agers destroyed several of these standards on the graves of G.A.R. Veterans in Mt. Hope Cemetery. All of 
these standards have been replaced. 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy 



67 



VETERANS' MEMORIAL STUDY 



In accordance with the guidance and direction received at the September 27, 1966 meeting of the Town of 
Acton Board of Selectmen and the War Memorial Study Committee a meeting of the Acton War Memorial Study- 
Committee was held on January 4, 1967 at the Acton Town Hall. 

The purpose of the meeting was to prepare a final report of the Acton War Memorial Study Committee for 
presentation to the Acton Board of Selectmen on January 10, 1967. 

a. Agenda Item #1: Assemble/Evaluate Cost Data for the following alternative courses of action 

1. Stone Memorials (Normal Gilbert) 

2. War Memorial Scholarship (Arthur C. Sims) 

3. Tennis Courts (Myron M. Hnatio) 

Discussion: Alternative #1 - Stone Memorials 

Cassells Monument Co., Inc., of Waltham, Mass. submitted the following Cost Proposals: 

Proposal A: A vertical, double base memorial, height of 9' 2"; width 6' 8"; 
depth 2'6". Less sub -foundation. 
Cost: $2. 112. 00 

Proposal B: A vertical double base memorial, height of 8'4"; width 6'2"; 
depth 2'4". Less sub -foundation. 
Cost: $1, 975. 00 

Proposal C: A horizontal memorial, height 3'2"; width 8'; depth 1'6". 
Less sub -foundation. 
Cost: $1,266.00 

Proposal D: Monolith, height 5'; width 3'; depth 10". Less sub -foundation. 
Cost: $580. 00 

Luz Bros. Monument Co. of Lowell, Mass. submitted the following Cost Proposal: 

Proposal A: Rock of Ages Granite: height 32"; width 4'; depth 14". 

Acton Monument Co. of North Acton, Mass. submitted the following proposal: 

Proposal A: Monolith: height 5' 2"; width 4' 2"; depth 1' 10". Less sub - 
foundation. 
Cost: $990. 00 

Alternative #2 - Acton War Memorial Scholarship 

Several Massachusetts Banks and Trust Companies were contacted regarding a Trust 
Fund to provide an Annual Scholarship to be awarded to a deserving son or daughter 
of an Acton War Veteran. The following information was obtained: 

a. The minimum Trust Fund requirement is $50,000. At an average of 5% earnings 
per year this Trust Fund would yield $2,500. 

b. To yield a full year scholarship of $3,500 the requirement of a Trust Fund would 
be $70,000. 

Alternative #3 - Construct 2 Tennis Courts 

Warren Brothers Roads Company of Brockton, Mass. submitted the following Cost Proposals: 

Proposal A: Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public Works 
Specification Class I, Type I-l 

Size 108' X 120' 

Two sets Net Posts 

10' high Chain Link Fence 
Cost: $9,000.00 

Proposal B: Same as above with Warren Bros. Company Cork Warcolite 
Surface. 
Cost: $12,000.00 



68 



Evaluation of the proposed alternative courses of action produced the following recommendation: 

Alternative ffl. Erect a Stone Memorial to commemorate the Acton Veterans of All Wars. Erect the 
Acton War Memorial at the site of the Acton Town Forest. Redesignate the Acton Town Forest to be known as 
the Acton War Memorial Recreation Park. Transfer jurisdiction of the Acton War Memorial Recreation Park 
to the Acton Recreation Commission for further development. 

Alternative Site to be : Site of Present Temporary War Memorial at the Acton Town Hall, Acton Center. 

Myron M. Hnatio, Chairman 
Norman Gilbert 
Arthur C. Sims 

Veterans Memorial Study Committee 



VETERANS AGENT 



The year ending December 31, 1966 has seen a marked increase in both case load and assistance rendered 
veterans in obtaining various federal benefits. A total of thirteen cases were aided in 1966. This represents an 
increase of four cases over the previous year. Of these, seven were temporary cases and six are permanent 
cases. 

During the year it was necessary to request a transfer from the Reserve Fund the sum of $2,000 to meet 
extraordinary and unforeseen medical expenses. 

Legislation was passed during the year that had an immediate effect upon the case load, and will have a 
further effect in the ensuing years. Most noteworthy was the elimination of the former settlement requirements, 
whereby residence was substituted for settlement. Formerly, in order to gain a settlement, it was necessary 
for a recipient to have resided within the Town for five consecutive years. This requirement has now been elim- 
inated. 

On September 9, 1966 Chapter 793 of the Acts of 1966 was passed which further defined "Vietnam Veteran" 
within the Commonwealth. This act confers veterans status on any veteran who has served more than one hun- 
dred and eighty days on active duty in the Armed Forces of the United States between February first, nineteen 
hundred and fifty-five and the termination of the Vietnam campaign as declared by proper federal authority. 

The sum of $10,025.76 was expended for Veterans' Aid for the year ending December 31, 1966. 

I have requested a substantial increase in the 1967 budget which is attributed to an increased case load. 

Norman L. Roche 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 



For the year ending December 31, 1966, there were eight accidents reported from the following departments: 

Board of Health 1 

Tree and Moth Department 2 

Highway Department 2 

School Department 3 

Six required medical attention only, two required medical attention and lost some time but are in the 
process of being finalized. 

Theron A. Lowden 



69 



INSURANCE 




The year 1966 saw a general revision of the Insurance Program of the Town of Acton involving broadening 
of the Public Liability Insurance so that the operations of Town Departments are now covered as well as schedule 
of Town buildings. 

This additional Liability Insurance increased the cost of the Town Insurance budget by about $1,000. but 
we were almost able to compensate for this expenditure by putting the Fire Insurance Schedule out for bids and 
splitting it into two separate packages, one for the School Department and one for the other Town buildings, for 
in this way we were able to take advantage of the most advantageous combination of rates, so that the net effect 
of the increased liability protection was in the area of $200 or $300. 

Regardless of any skill that we may have in reducing our rates and shifting markets, the steady growth of 
the Town, in particular the school system, continues to force the budget up. The budget submitted in 1965 was 
$24,000. and in 1966, $30,500., which we did exceed due to special situations where part of the 1965 budget was 
spent in 1966. In 1967 we will see the budget jump again to $34,255. and almost the entire amount results from 
the increase in Blue Cross and Group Life Insurance on an increasing number of Town employees. The rest of 
the budget we have been able to hold almost on the same figure as in the past in spite of the fact that during 1967 
insurance on the new elementary school will be added to the schedule and this is included in the budget. 

I wish to acknowledge and thank the Town Treasurer, Executive Clerk and Finance Committee for their 
patience and cooperation during the re -alignment of the Town insurance. The accounting details have been most 
complex and they have been extremely patient in assisting us. 

Thomas Motley, Chairman 
Charles M. MacRae 
Raymond A. Gallant 
David P. Tinker 
The r on A. Lowden 

Town Insurance Committee 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 



Several encouraging developments occurred during 1966 in the industrial and commercial growth of Acton. 
A second building has been erected and occupied in Williamsburg Park on School Street. On Route 27 in North 
Acton, a building was built by Richard W. Jenney which is fully occupied and another building is underway adja- 
cent to this one. The Haartz property has been occupied and two buildings are available for rental. 

The Acton Laboratories Division of Bowmar Corporation was sold to Crescent Corporation and renamed 
Acton Environmental Testing Corporation, remaining in the same building on Route 27 in Acton Center. The 
other building on this property has been partially occupied by rentals. 



An industrial building on River Street in South Acton was destroyed by fire. 
Insulation Company and is being rebuilt. 



It was occupied by Acton 



Several comnaercial establishments have located here, primarily on Route 2A and in the West Acton area. 
One commercial building was erected in North Acton on Route 27 near Harris Street and is fully occupied. By 
vote of the last Town Meeting, our membership was increased to nine, and work is underway to plan commercial 
and business growth as well as industrial growth. Our recurrent problems of lack of water and the high price of 
industrial land, particularly for small buyers, have reappeared as in previous years. 

Stephen E. Lord, Chairman 
Frederick H. Bubier 
William P. McDonald 
Ralph C. Morse 
Frederick M. Haynes 
Edward W. Flannery 
Allen M. Christofferson 
Thomas J. Litle 
Richard J. O'Neil 

Industrial Development Commission 



70 



'■^y' 



■Ml 



BIRTHS 



Births recorded 199 

Marriages recorded 82 

Deaths recorded 57 

IMPORTANT REQUEST 

Please notify the Town Clerk immediately of any error or omission in the following list of Births. Errors 
not reported at once can be corrected only by sworn affidavit, as prescribed by the General Laws, and may 
cause you inconvenience which can be avoided by prompt attention. 



Date 



Place 



Jan. 


1 


Concord 


Jan. 


3 


Boston 


Jan. 


6 


Concord 


Jan. 


7 


Concord 


Jan. 


15 


Concord 


Jan. 


23 


Boston 


Jan. 


24 


Concord 


Jan. 


28 


Concord 


Jan. 


29 


Concord 


Jan. 


31 


Concord 


Feb. 


3 


Concord 


Feb. 


6 


Acton 


Feb. 


5 


Concord 


Feb. 


8 


Concord 


Feb. 


10 


Concord 


Feb. 


11 


Concord 


Feb. 


12 


Concord 


Feb. 


14 


Concord 


Feb. 


14 


Concord 


Feb. 


15 


Concord 


Feb. 


17 


Concord 


Feb. 


19 


Concord 


Feb. 


22 


Concord 


Feb. 


25 


Concord 


Feb. 


25 


Newton 


Mar. 


1 


Concord 


Mar. 


1 


Concord 


Mar. 


2 


Concord 


Mar. 


2 


Concord 


Mar. 


3 


Concord 


Mar. 


3 


Concord 


Mar. 


9 


Concord 


Mar. 


10 


Concord 


Mar. 


16 


Concord 


Mar. 


17 


Concord 


Mar. 


18 


Concord 


Mar. 


20 


Concord 


Mar. 


22 


Concord 


Mar. 


22 


Melrose 


Mar. 


25 


Concord 


Mar. 


25 


Worcester 


Mar. 


27 


Framingham 


Mar. 


30 


Woburn 


Mar. 


30 


Woburn 


Mar. 


31 


Concord 


Apr. 


2 


Concord 


Apr. 


5 


Concord 


Apr. 


5 


Concord 


Apr. 


5 


Lowell 



BIRTHS REGISTERED IN 1966 

Name of Child 

Geddes, John Joseph, IV 
Mahoney, 
Jacobsen, Scott 
Brandon, Alan Richard 
Kennaugh, Eric David 
Dilworth, Peter Charles 
MacLeod, Tammy Lynne 
Deckert, Christine Lee 
Thompson, Terence Ross 
Worthley, Craig Thomas 

Roberts, Jeffrey Scott 
Barringer, Holli 
Berrigan, Brenda Michele 
Renaccio, Marybeth 
Marcewicz, Mark Joseph 
Bonk, Laura Maria 
Rounds, Daniel Paul 
Sals giver, Carolyn Haines 
Steiner, Roberta Lyn 
Kelley, Amy Colette 
Hart, Robert Allen 
Laird, Molly Russell 
Magurn, Arthur Augustine, IV 
Gazan, Richard Stanford, Jr. 
Hodges, Sarah Procter 

Landry, John Steven 
O'Neill, Sean Andrew 
Krason, Daniel Henry 
Phillips, Robert Kevin 
Duren, Paul Christopher 
Flynn, Kathleen Mary 
Prentiss, Timothy Wade 
Gray, Amy Kathleen 
Lawrence, Michael Patrick 
Paakkonen, Glen John 
Dillon, Michelle Anne 
Harris, Wendie Anne 
Bongiorno, Laura Diane 
Gobbeo, Kenneth Alan 
Edwardsen, Brian Howal 
Roder, Mark Thomas 
Philbin, Kevin Michael 
Scire, Kimberly 
Scire, Wayne 
York, Edward Leighton, II 

Wineholt, Keith Andrew 
Goff, David Alan 
Granberg, Brian 
Moscato, Virginia Ann 



Name of Parents 

John J., Ill and Helen M. Riley 
John J. and Joan B. Kelley 
Ronald G. and Justine M. Hollywood 
Robert J. and Erna A. Homfeld 
William T. and Julie A. Krum 
Donald C. and Carolyn D. Weinreb 
John E. and Donna J. Martin 
Richard R. and Florence I. Bridges 
Francis J. and Marianne H. Johnson 
Thomas S. and Davida A. Stagner 

Alan R. and Paula A. Rusch 
Charles E. and Elinor A. Schulz 
Maurice P. and Gertrude H. Kenney 
Michael N. and Priscilla A. Manzo 
Joseph A. and Marilyn E. Nealey 
Basil A. and Linda M. Hardy 
Joseph O., Jr. and Maureen A. Treacy 
John P. and Carol B. Haines 
Robert A. and Carol M. Persall 
Francis J. and Geraldine Perry 
Thomas M. and Janice E. House 
Lindsay R. and Mary A. Nordquist 
Arthur A. Ill and Judith E. Hume 
Richard S. and Rosemarie Ohanesian 
Frederick J., Jr. and Sheila M. Hertslet 

Charles J. and Carole L. Croft 
Joseph R. and Jean S. Graves 
Henry C. and Irene L. Paradis 
Charles R. and Catherine L. Sullivan 
Irving S., Ill and Caroline V. Kangas 
Martin J. and Joan A. Oko 
Harold O., Jr. and Dorothy V. Rahberg 
Robert L. and Grace M. Ammendolia 
Albert J. and Patricia E. Reilly 
Gene H. and Linda M. Gunn 
Norman M. and Diane M. Schnair 
James H. and Elizabeth A. LeDuke 
Anthony J. and Diane T. DiMare 
Anthony R. and Shirley A. lodice 
Sanford C. and Donna A. Semple 
John and Beverly Cox 
William E. and Jane E. Nash 
Richard J. and Faith A. Jollymore 
Richard J. and Faith A. Jollymore 
Edward L. and Marcia B. Reardon 

Robert L. and Judy B. Smith 
Kenneth A. and Cristel E. Noe 
Eric and Cheryl T. Hammond 
Richard and Virginia Madden 



71 



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wi^:^jiss!^ 



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U •* -„ 

1 y 



■Vi. 









fS-v; fV';;r.<j 



i'i 



Apr. 


6 


Concord 


Apr. 


8 


Concord 


Apr. 


9 


Concord 


Apr. 


10 


Concord 


Apr. 


10 


Concord 


Apr. 


11 


Concord 


Apr. 


11 


Cambridge 


Apr. 


12 


Concord 


Apr. 


12 


Boston 


Apr. 


13 


Concord 


Apr. 


14 


Concord 


Apr. 


14 


Boston 


Apr. 


18 


Concord 


Apr. 


20 


Concord 


Apr. 


22 


Concord 


Apr. 


24 


Arlington 


Apr. 


30 


Arlington 


Apr. 


30 


Concord 


May 


5 


Concord 


May 


8 


Concord 


May 


9 


Concord 


May 


14 


Concord 


May 


15 


Medford 


May 


16 


Concord 


May 


17 


Concord 


May 


18 


Norwood 


May 


19 


Concord 


May 


22 


Cambridge 


May 


25 


Concord 


May 


26 


Concord 


May 


31 


Cambridge 


June 


1 


Concord 


June 


8 


Concord 


June 


10 


Cambridge 


June 


11 


Concord 


June 


12 


Concord 


June 


13 


Concord 


June 


13 


Acton 


June 


13 


Concord 


June 


19 


Concord 


June 


21 


Concord 


June 


21 


Concord 


June 


22 


Concord 


June 


24 


Concord 


June 


24 


Concord 


June 


26 


Concord 


June 


29 


Concord 


July 


1 


Concord 


July 


4 


Concord 


July 


7 


Concord 


July 


12 


Concord 


July 


13 


Concord 


July 


13 


Concord 


July 


14 


Concord 


July 


15 


Waltham 


July 


19 


Boston 


July 


20 


Concord 


July 


21 


Concord 


July 


25 


Concord 


July 


27 


Lynn 


July 


28 


Concord 


July 


30 


Concord 


Aug. 


2 


Concord 


Aug. 


4 


Concord 


Aug. 


6 


Concord 


Aug. 


7 


Marlborough 


Aug. 


7 


Concord 


Aug. 


10 


Concord 


Aug. 


11 


Concord 



Winnett, Nancy Catherine 
Wilkins, Kimberley Anne 
Bourgeois, Patricia Joan 
Tuffin, Daniel Leonard 
Tuffin, Michael Claude 
Hopkins, Matthew Francis 
March, Daniel 
Davison, Ann Marie 
Lowden, Peter Charles 
BigelQw, Thomas Edward 
Kehoe, Stephen 
Malster, John Lindsay 
Landry, Kevin Michael 
Totas, Kenneth John 
Huettner, Stephen Joseph 
Singleton, Alexander David 
Gately, Lauren Dorothy 
Gratz, Marjorie 

Grigas, David Matthew 
Bernstein, Deborah Lynn 
Hirano, Scott Masayoshi 
Cell, Courtney Ann 
Conquest, Jeffrey Michael 
Ross, Steven Dana 
Phipps, Lisa Jane 
Barry, Kathleen Louise 
Cronin, Peter Joseph 
Dewire, Edward Francis 
Wespiser, William John 
Hirt, Pamela Leigh 
Maher, Christina 

Boisvert, Benjamin Alan 
Hebert, Joseph David 
Plummer, Suzanne Priscilla 
Dykema, Richard John 
Bernard, Karen Jean 
Blackwell, Deanna Marie 
Carter, Calvin Spaulding 
Spann, Jessica Lee 
McDonough, Denis e Irene 
Engelbrecht, Maureen Ellen 
Smith, Douglas Leigh 
Olsen, Erik Christopher 
Arms, David Clesson, Jr. 
MacLeod, Sharon Arlene 
Gregory, Lauri Marie 
Babineau, John Jay 

Lowell, Susan Dawn 
Quadri, Maria Gale 
Butler, Mark Andrew 
Morehouse, Kenneth Anders 
Bryant, Richard Turberville 
Leone, Nicholas Vincent 
Ryan, Rebecca-Marie 
Boisvert, Michael Roger 
Pozzo, William Francis 
Furney, Paul David 
Lennon, Arwyn Elaine 
Case, Sara Tinker 
Trocki, Lisa Ann Marie 
Hildreth, Elisabeth Marie 
Nelson, Lisa Ann 

Finnimore, Ian Paul 
Hopkins, Harold Patrick 
Flerra, Sharon Ann 
Hupfer, Kraig William 
Lazaro, Bruce Scott 
Nelson, Dawn Geraldine 
Shaw, Clifford Daniel 



Roderick H. and Carol S. Young 
Nason L., Jr. and Valerie S. Scott 
Charles J. and Joyce V. Dunn 
Wilson B. and Janice M. Goeke 
Wilson B. and Janice M. Goeke 
Richard C. and Eleanor M. McHugh 
Frederick G. and Ellin P. Barry 
David S. and Joan A. Parmenter 
David and Patricia West 
Robert E., Jr. and Janet K. Stelting 
Ambrose V. and Sophie Sporrer 
Robert L. and Joan H. Cameron 
Richard A. and Janet J. French 
Joseph K. and Patricia A. Marshall 
Robert E. and Virginia M. Cejka 
Peter A. and Kathleen J. Dolfe 
William J. and Dorothy C. Perachi 
William C. and Reda M. Greenberg 

Peter W. and Shirley M. Noyes 
Joseph H. and Paula G. Miller 
David Y. and Sandra E. Sparks 
Mario J. and Lorraine C. Talamona 
James H. and Deborah Thompson 
Howard P. and Barbara M. Lewis 
Robert L. and Ruby O. Sundeen 
Kevin F. and Marilyn L. Mulcairns 
Peter J. and Helen E. Scollins 
Edward F. and Janet M. Murphy 
Robert J. and Lucille M. Laramee 
Robert P. and Mary E. Smith 
Gerard P. and Judith C. Hansen 

Roland and Paula A. Pietsch 
Paul L. and Margaret T. Sexton 
John C. and Beverly L. Brown 
Laverne D. and Diane H. Lindley 
Paul R. and Beverly D. Botelho 
Dennis M. and Donna M. Nichols 
Robert M. and Christine I. Spaulding 
Adril C. and Phyllis M. Bissonn-.,'tte 
William H. and Mary E. Mahoney 
Arthur F. and Barbara M. Roberts 
Donald L. and Lee B. Winkley 
Kenneth A. and Carolyn C. Casey 
David C. and Antoinette M. Fucci 
Robert P. and Janet K. Priest 
John V. and Joan F. Priest 
Emile A., Jr. and Diane B. Burnham 

Charles L. and Alice M. Goodfield 
Mario and Carolyn H. Klauber 
Horace B. and Laura H. Stapel 
Charles A. and Gertrude M. Hartmanni 
Michael and Jill M. Turberville 
Gerald M. and Corinne M. Romley 
Robert M., Sr. and Maureen H. Jones 
Norman P. and Louise Littlefield 
Richard W. and Annie L. Slipp 
David L. and Alice M. Parlee 
Donald J. J. and Lucy E. Griffiths 
Frank T. and Mary E. Lehto 
Robert J. and Edwina C. Garabedian 
Donald R. and Elisabeth L. Miller 
Stanley E. and Cynthia A. Nelson 

John R. and Jane Bulling 
Harold M. D. and Ellen C. Gallagher 
Paul L. and Eudora A. Troupe 
Karl W. and Janet E. MacLean 
Barry C. and Lynda L. Jeanson 
Joseph W. and Francine Corey 
Clifford P. and Elizabeth M. Douglas 



72 



A LONG RANGE CONSERVATION PLAN FOR ACTON 



At the Town Meeting in December 1966, the Town voted to join the Met^-opolitan Area Planning District. 
As a part of the requirements for membership, the Conservation Commission is required to submit a Conserva- 
tion Plan for the Town. We have also been informied by the Conservation Services Branch of the Department of 
Natural Resources that after July 1967, no applications for Self Help Conservation funds will be honored if the 
local Conservation Commission has not filed such a plan with the Department. 

Since the founding of the Conservation Commission in 1960, it has been continuously developing such a 
Conservation Plan for Acton. We have recently completed our detailed plan and have produced a map which 
describes that plan. That map is reproduced on the center fold of this Town Report. It should be realized that 
this plan is a long-range plan, and as such is subject to modification and revision almost constantly as the many 
interconnected economic forces at play in the Town make themselves felt. Reasons for modification could include: 

1. previously unidentified lands of conservation value being offered for sale, 

2. designated lands being developed for some non-compatible use (housing, schools, industry, etc.), 

3. owners unwillingness to sell designated land to the Town, 

4. inability to reach a mutually acceptable price for purchase, 

5. unwillingness of the Town to approve a prospective purchase, 

6. lack of funds to purchase lands. 

Naturally there are many other reasons why certain phases of this plan could not be implemented; however, 
it is our hope that the ideas expressed through the plan could be carried out if not on the specific areas designated, 
then on some alternate area. These areas and appropriate alternatives are not unlimited however, so there is a 
certain degree of urgency associated with these ideas. 

This plan represents a compilation of ideas from: The Master Plan, The Natural Resources Inventory, and 
Planning Board studies, and the Commission itself. We hope the plan receives your approval and active support 
throughout the many years necessary to bring such an admittedly large-scale, long-range plan to successful 
implementation. 

Certain aspects of the Plan are described below: 

1.0 West Acton 

1.1 Fort Pond Brook Wetlands Area - this was the area defined in the 
Planning Board Study in 1965. 

1.2 Fairgrounds (Mass. Ave. opposite Pumping Station) - potential 
development into swimraing, picnicing area. 

1.3 Flagg Hill Area - potential development into neighborhood playground. 

1.4 Grassy Pond Area - multiple use area - water impoundment wildlife 
sanctuary (section D-8, Natural Resources Inventory). 

2.0 South Acton 

2.1 Main Street - water impoundment area (section D-12, Natural 
Resources Inventory). 

2.2 High Street - multiple use area - water imipoundment, active 
recreation (section D-14, Natural Resources Inventory). 

2.3 Country Club Road to Parker Street - wildlife sanctuary, passive 
recreational area. 

2.4 Standpipe Hill - potential site for municipal ski slope, active and 
passive recreation area. 

2.5 Laws Brook Road - multiple use area - water impoundment, passive 
recreation (section D-16, Natural Resources Inventory). 

3.0 North Acton 

3.1 Wills Hole - expansion of Town Forest area, preservation of 
geologically important quaking bog, passive recreation, access 
way from Henley Road to Town Forest. 

3.2 Spring Hill Road - passive recreation, game preserve. 

3.3 Strawberry Hill to Nashoba Brook - potential site for future 
municipal golf course. 



m 



BOROUGH 




2.'A ''•''o>V,<i 



CORD 




EXISTING 
n PROPOSED 



CONSERVATION MAP 
TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 

JANUARY, 1967 



SCALE IN FEET 



Aug. 


15 


Concord 


Aug. 


16 


Concord 


Aug. 


17 


Concord 


Aug. 


17 


Fitchburg 


Aug. 


19 


Concord 


Aug. 


19 


Boston 


Aug. 


21 


Concord 


Aug. 


21 


Waltham 


Aug. 


23 


Newburyport 


Aug. 


23 


Concord 


Aug. 


23 


Concord 


Aug. 


23 


Concord 


Aug. 


24 


Concord 


Aug. 


26 


Concord 


Aug. 


26 


Concord 


Aug. 


26 


Concord 


Aug. 


28 


Concord 


Aug. 


31 


Lowell 


Aug. 


31 


Concord 


Sept. 


1 


Concord 


Sept. 


3 


Concord 


Sept. 


3 


Concord 


Sept. 


12 


Concord 


Sept. 


13 


Winchester 


Sept. 


17 


Winchester 


Sept. 


19 


Worcester 


Sept. 


20 


Concord 


Sept. 


24 


Concord 


Sept. 


25 


Concord 


Sept. 


28 


Concord 


Oct. 


2 


Concord 


Oct. 


3 


Concord 


Oct. 


4 


Concord 


Oct. 


4 


New London, N.H 


Oct. 


9 


Concord 


Oct. 


12 


Concord 


Oct. 


12 


Concord 


Oct. 


12 


Boston 


Oct. 


15 


Boston 


Oct. 


17 


Boston 


Oct. 


19 


Concord 


Oct. 


21 


Winchester 


Oct. 


26 


Concord 


Oct. 


26 


Concord 


Oct. 


27 


Concord 


Oct. 


29 


Boston 


Oct. 


29 


Concord 


Oct. 


29 


Concord 


Oct. 


30 


Concord 


Nov. 


4 


Concord 


Nov. 


4 


Concord 


Nov. 


6 


Concord 


Nov. 


7 


Concord 


Nov. 


8 


Concord 


Nov. 


11 


Concord 


Nov. 


11 


Concord 


Nov. 


12 


Concord 


Nov. 


15 


Concord 


Nov. 


16 


Concord 


Nov. 


16 


Concord 


Nov. 


17 


Concord 


Nov. 


19 


Cambridge 


Nov. 


21 


Concord 


Nov. 


22 


Concord 


Dec. 


1 


Concord 


Dec. 


3 


Concord 


Dec. 


5 


Concord 


Dec. 


7 


Concord 


Dec. 


8 


Concord 



Morse, Julie Ann 
Naramore, Thomas Burton 
Paul, Thomas Cantzon 
Williamson, David Muir 
Horton, Katherine Mae 
Howell, David Jeffrey- 
Douglas, Katherine 
Gianetto, John Thomas 
Richardson, Aimee Kendall 
Killian, Peter Alan 
O'Donoghue, Kerry Elizabeth 
Vinciguerra, Gina Mary 
Donovan, Candia Florence 
Krussman, Rodger Gustavus 
McShane, Patricia Jean 
Perkins, Melissa Gaye 
Vanderwart, Stacy Barrett 
Herling, Margaret Anne 
Vrablik, Kevin Allen 

Ladley, Bruce Edward 
Mattison, Nicole Hale 
Mayer, Brian James 
Muscato, Sheila Ann 
Gavin, Ann Helen 
Alex, Joseph Baker 
Williams, David Howard 
Cook, Christopher Francis 
Hannon, Patricia Ann 
Chick, John Bradley HI 
Evans, Karl Wayne 

Claggett, Peter William 
Carpenter, Christopher Jon 
Clark, Katherine Elizabeth 
LaPierre, Theodore David 
Bernier, Douglas Eugene 
Burnett, Jennifer Ann 
Murray, Charles Alfred 
Nelson, Craig Emory 
Shutt, Susan Elizabeth 
Beaupre, Pamela Jane 
McFarlane, Alison 
Johnson, Adria Leigh 
Morton, Anette Marie 
Browne, Christine Elizabeth 
Spies, Andrew Dawn 
Mahoney, Timothy James 
Meleedy, Kevin Michael 
Morey, Diana 
Kemper, Kristen Lynne 

Holm, Ronald Allen 
Martin, Lisa Mary 
Frost, Gordon Scott 
Lavallee, 

Flannery, Jeanette Linda 
Jolley, Kimberly 
Orio, Nicholas Damian 
Mallard, Michael James 
Adams, Lynn Alice 
Grancey, Christa Jane 
Hay, Brandon Cary 
Mutty, Jennifer Le 
Leary, Maura Lee 
Juergens, Eric Malcolm 
Dentino, Danielle 

Gruen, Pamela Jean 
McAllister, Robert Neil, Jr. 
Crowley, Margaret Theresa 
Seward, Christine 
Veenstra, Norman Albert 



Joseph N. 
Francis P. 
Edward J. 



Frederick C. and Janet F. Gentsch 
John B. and Marcia J. McGuire 
Henry C. and Pearl J. Hagins 
Robert J. and Joan C. Pearson 
David F. and Bette L. Hartshorn 
Richard H. and Barbara Huni 
Donald and Margaret Hale 
Edmund A. and Barbara A. Fagundes 
John E. and Kathy D. Random 
John D. and Priscilla E. Boggs 
Henry J. and Barbara A. Haas 
Stephen M. P. and Linda M. A. Calabria 
Francis and Florence K. Pendleton 
Colwyn S. and Marilyn J. Sturges 
Charles L. and Jean D. Lindvall 
William S. C. and Nancy C. Gibbs 
Herman and Joyce N. Orton 
Edward R. and Barbara A. Payne 
Edward A. and Carol A. Kinzie 

Edward M., Jr. and Joan F. Fullonton 
Roger H. and Karleen L. Kakes 
Joseph C. and Anna M. Brady 

and Mary S. Flynn 
and Carlene A. Dunkleberger 

and Susan J. Chapin 
Cecil and Selina Whenlock 
Donald S. and Sandra A. Hickey 
George A. and Martha J. Hoffman 
John B., Jr. and Barbara A. Berg 
Ronald W. and Sandra L. Storer 

William E. and Carle D. Maier 
Philip W. and Ann M. Williams 
Richard G. and Mary E. St. Pierre 
Theodore L. and Evelyn G. Wasson 
Richard E. and Nancy M. Kimball 
Richard P. and Deanna G. Young 
Alfred F. and Nancy L. Small 
Roy A. and Valerie Piggott 
Richard T. and Robin L. Mara 
Peter M. and Karen E. Richter 
Bruce W. and Sarah J. Day 
Richard M. and Beverly A. Jakeway 
William C. and Linda L. Allen 
James D. and Kathleen A. Hill 
Peter J. and Heidrun M. Stoll 
David F. and Phyllis A. Scott 
Francis J. and Barbara A. Boutin 
Samuel W. and Constance L. Byl 
John F. and Jacqueline L. Myers 

Allen and Rhoda B. Phinnemore 
William E. and Barbara M. Hartwell 
Clarence G. and Diana P. McKinstry 
Robert L. and Sandra J. Murphy 
Edward W. and Cecelia J. Cooke 
Curtiss E. and Katy L. Womack 
Carl D. and Claudette I. Arcand 
Robert S., Sr. and Edna A. Nichols 
Donald R. and Betty A. Ruddock 
William J. and Nancy J. Evans 
Robert A. and Betty J. Thompson 
Lewis D. and Jessie W. Knippel 
Edward M. and Carol A. Foley 
Ronald C. and Carol A. LeShane 
Frank B. and Jacquelyn Davis 

Paul J. and Brenda A. Bailey 
Robert N. and Helen Ingram 
Charles L. and Rachel M. Brzezinsky 
Charles M. and Beverly J. Holmes 
Norman R. and Albertine Wihlelm 



73 



Dec. 


9 


Framingham 


Dec. 


10 


Concord 


Dec. 


12 


Concord 


Dec. 


13 


Concord 


Dec. 


14 


Concord 


Dec. 


15 


Concord 


Dec. 


15 


Concord 


Dec. 


15 


Concord 


Dec. 


16 


Concord 


Dec. 


16 


Concord 


Dec. 


20 


Concord 


Dec. 


29 


Concord 



Gray, Kristin Leanne 
Bobbins, Bert Loring 
Paquette, Lucile Ann 
Wylie, Katharine Lee 
Random, Deborah Dianne 
Houde, Karen Jean 
Jacque, Mark Mitchell 
Keating, Elizabeth Ann 
Doyle, Shawn Wylie 
Hedlund, Matthew John 
Tannuzzo, Nicolas 
Holmes, Kenneth Patrick 



Jeffrey E. and Marsha Belanger 
Edgar L., Jr. and Mildred F. Loring 
George A. and Naomi L. Ashley 
John H. and Barbara L. Barnes 
David A. and Barbara G. Preston 
Kenneth E. and Barbara J. Hodgman 
Andrew J. and Gertrude M. Eisler 
Joseph W. and Lisebeth A. Culhane 
John J., Ill and Dorothy M. Pugsley 
Carl L and Susan A. Weber 
Raymond J. and Barbara Krysieniel 
John L. and Joan C. Mclnnis 



DOG LICENSES 



ALL DOG LICENSES EXPIRE MARCH 31, 19 6 7. 

DOGS MUST BE LICENSED ON OR BEFORE 
APRIL 1ST OR THE OWNERS OR KEEPERS 
THEREOF ARE LIABLE TO A FINE. 

THE LAW APPLIES TO ALL DOGS THREE 
MONTHS OLD OR OVER, REGARDLESS OF 
TIME OF YEAR OWNERSHIP IS ACQUIRED. 

NO TAX BILLS ARE SENT TO OWNERS OF 
DOGS. 



REPORT OF DOG LICENSES 
ISSUED IN 1966 



888 Licenses 

112 Licenses 

4 Licenses 

5 Licenses 

2 Licenses 

51 Duplicate Tags . . . 

Paid to Town Treasurer. 



2. 


00 


$1, 


776. 


00 


5. 


00 




560. 


00 


10. 


00 




40. 


00 


25. 


00 




125. 


00 


50. 


00 




100. 


00 




25 




12. 


75 




$2, 


613. 


75 



DOG OFFICER 



I herewith submit my report for Dog Officer for the year ending 1966. 

Calls and complaints handled 219 

Stray dogs picked up 31 

Dogs returned to owner 25 

Dogs disposed of 6 

Carl W . Flint 



74 



TOWN ELECTION 



March 7, 1966 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Whole number of votes cast 409 403 767 1579 

MODERATOR, One year 

John W. Putnam ■ • 371 

Blanks 38 

TOWN CLERK, One year 

Charles M. MacRae 378 

Blanks 31 

SELECTMAN, Three years 

John H. Loring 263 

Irving H. Gravin 141 

Blanks 5 

ASSESSOR, Three years 

JohnE. Dunphy, Jr 188 

John J. Flannery 187 

Blanks 34 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE, Three years 

Ivar Peterson 381 

Blanks 28 

TREASURER and COLLECTOR, One year 

Wm. Henry Soar 381 

Blanks : 28 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE, Three years 

Albert W. Koch 323 

Margaret A. Garlow 181 

James S. Winston . 93 

Roy J. Zabierek 142 

Blanks 79 

CONSTABLES, One year 

Chauncey R. Fenton, Jr 370 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy 360 

Blanks 906 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONER, Three years 

Harlan E. Tuttle 379 

Blanks 30 

BOARD OF HEALTH, Three years 

George W. Moulton 364 

Blanks 45 

BOARD OF HEALTH, Two years (To fill vacancy) 

John S. Golden 3 62 

Blanks 47 

BOARD OF HEALTH, One year (To fill vacancy) 

J. Huston Westover 378 

Blanks 31 

TRUSTEE OF MEMORIAL LIBRARY. Three years 

James L. Parker 370 

Blanks 39 

TRUSTEE OF MEMORIAL LIBRARY, Two years (To fill vacancy) 

Margaret Richter 3 69 

Blanks 40 



75 



356 

47 


694 
73 


1421 
158 


362 

41 


714 
53 


1454 
125 


228 

166 

9 


459 

290 

18 


950 

597 

32 


164 

209 

30 


452 

271 

44 


804 
667 
108 


352 

51 


691 
76 


1424 
155 


363 

40 


703 
64 


1447 
132 


267 

146 
127 
141 
125 


528 
218 
231 
372 
185 


1118 
545 
451 
655 
389 


357 
340 
915 


687 
673 

1708 


1414 
1373 
3529 


365 
38 


713 
54 


1457 
122 


351 
52 


683 
84 


1398 
181 


348 
55 


681 
86 


1391 
188 


365 
38 


699 
68 


1442 
137 


348 
55 


677 
90 


1395 
184 


347 
56 


687 
80 


1403 
176 



PLANNING BOARD, Five years 

Charles E. Orcutt, Jr 312 

Timothy McCrudden 72 

Blanks 25 

TREE WARDEN, One year 

Franklin H. Charter 3 84 

Blanks 25 

QUESTION: "Shall the town vote to accept the provisions of 
section one hundred eight G of chapter forty-one 
of the General Laws whereby, if accepted, the 
minimum annual compensation of each regular 
police officer in the police department of the 
Town of Acton shall be not less than Five thou- 
sand, five hundred dollars for the first year of 
service, six thousand dollars for the second 
year of service, and six thousand, three hun- 
dred dollars for the third and each succeeding 
year of service?" 

Yes 234 

No 147 

Blanks 28 



292 
94 

17 



365 
38 



540 

161 

66 



708 
59 



1144 
327 
108 



1457 
122 



253 


432 


919 


127 


287 


561 


23 


48 


99 



A true copy. Attest: 



CHARLES M. MacRAE 
Town Clerk 



TOWN EMPLOYEES INSURANCE COMMITTEE 



The Committee is recommending the acceptance of Section IIB of Chapter 32B which will extend benefits 
to reitred employees that retired prior to October 1, 1961. 

David W. Scribner 
Viola Foley 
Carolyn Douglas 
Arno Perkins 
Stewart F. Kennedy 

Town Employees Insurance Advisory Committee 



76 



TOWN MEETINGS - 1966 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 14, 1966 



Article 4: BYLAWS 

MOTION: To amend Section 7 of the Town Bylaws, entitled "Personnel Bylaw for Wage and Salary Determination 
and Administration", by increasing by an approximate 3% the figures in Schedule A, Schedule B and Schedule C, 
to be effective April 1, 1966; provided that if any figure thus increased is lower than a compensation rate figure 
required by Section 108G of Chapter forty-one of the General Laws, the figure required by said Section 108G 
shall be substituted; a copy of the revised figures to be submitted by the Personnel Board to the Town Clerk at 
its earliest convenience. 

MOTION: To strike out 3% and insert 9.7%. 

Moderator appointed the following tellers: Dana B. Hinckley, Harold W. Flood, Elizabeth H. Boardman, Edith 
D. Stowell, Justin J. Hartman, Charles D. MacPherson, Thomas N. Rogers, Bert J. Schafer. 



Total votes: 494 
MOTION LOST. 



Yes - 234 



No - 260 



VOTED: To strike out 3% and insert 9.6%. 

VOTED: To amend Section 7 of the Town Bylaws, entitled "Personnel Bylaw for Wage and Salary Determination 
and Administration", by increasing by an approximate 9.6% the figures in Schedule A, Schedule B and Schedule C, 
to be effective April 1, 1966; provided that if any figure thus increased is lower than a compensation rate figure 
required by Section 108G of Chapter forty-one of the General Laws, the figure required by said Section 108G 
shall be substituted; a copy of the revised figures to be submitted by the Personnel Board to the Town Clerk at 
its earliest convenience. 



ELECTED 
ELECTED 
ELECTED 
ELECTED 
ELECTED 



Article 1. 

Eleanor P. Wilson trustee of the Elizabeth White Fund for three years. 

H. Stuart MacGregor trustee of the West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund for three years. 

Clarence A. Frost trustee of the Acton Firemen's Relief Fund for three years. 

Clark C. McElvein trustee of the Goodnow Fund for three years. 

Percival W. Wood trustee of the Citizen's Library Association of West Acton for three years. 



VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: 
1966 be as follows: 



That the compensation of Elected Officers of the Town of Acton for the calendar year 



Moderator. . . $20. 00 per each night per meeting 

Board of Selectmen: 

Chairman $ 750.00 

Clerk 650. 00 

Member 650. 00 

Town Treasurer and Collector 7,270.00 

Town Clerk 2, 305. 00 

Board of Assessors: 

Chairman 1,600.00 

Clerk 1, 200. 00 

Member 1, 200. 00 



Board of Public Welfare: 

Chairman $150.00 

Member 100. 00 

Member 100. 00 



Board of Health: 
Chairman . 
Member. . 
Member. . 



150.00 
100. 00 
100. 00 



Tree Warden: At the rate of $2.70 per hour from 
January 1, 1966 to March 31, 1966 
and $2.90 per four from April 1, 
1966 to December 31, 1966, plus 
$.75 per hour for the use of his truck. 



Article 2: REPORTS 

VOTED: To accept the several reports of the Town Officers and Boards. 

^ Article 3: WATER DISTRICT STUDY REPORT 

fc^VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following - 

^B^ Report of the Committee to Study the Transfer of the Acton Water District to the Town of Acton 

Article 17 of the Acton Town Warrant for the 1965 Annual Meeting says in part "to see if the Town will vote 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint a committee of five to study the transfer of the Acton Water Dis- 
trict to the Town of Acton - and to report to the next Annual Town Meeting". 



77 



In view of the ambiguity of this directive, your committee has felt that its proper fields of investigation and 
discussion should be the following: 1) the necessary legal steps required to implement a transfer, 2) the proba- 
ble time required to complete such a move, should the Town decide to proceed, 3) our comments as to the 
advantages of initiating transfer proceedings, 4) the merits of continuance of the Acton Water District as now 
operating, 5) the effect of any change on Town finances, 6) methods of resolving wage differentials between 
Water District employees and those of the Town, should transfer be decided upon, and 7) Committee recommen- 
dations. 

Item 1: The legal steps would be the following. The Selectmen would initiate the drafting of an act of the State 
Legislature to permit the Town to vote on a proposed transfer. Acton's representative would be requested to 
present such an act to the Legislature for approval. 

This would emipower the Town to assume the assets and liabilities of the Water District, and to integrate 
it into the Town government, presumably as a separate departnnent. Suitable provision would be made for the 
disposition of existing Water District contracts. 

If approved by the Legislature, an appropriate article should be inserted by the Selectmen in the Warrant 
for the next Annual Town Meeting, or any subsequent Annual Town Meeting within a specified number of years. 

Inasmuch as the boundaries of the Water District and the Town are now coincident, and the same voting 
lists are used by the District and the Town, no meeting of the Water District would be required to take action 
on the foregoing, the action of the Town Meeting being determining. 

Item 2: The time required to implement a transfer would be as follows. Any such act should be in the hands of 
Acton's Representatives in time to be filed with the Legislature early in December, for action during the session 
of the following year. 

Should this act be approved, the aforementioned article could be included in the Warrant for the Annual 
Town Meeting the ensuing year. 

Thus if a decision to proceed with the transfer is taken by the Selectmen during 1966, it would be presented 
to the Legislature for action during 1967, and could then be acted upon by the Town at the 1968 Annual Town 
Meeting. 

The Town can, however, try to obtain legislation at any time when the General Court is in session. While 
the success of the effort depends upon the Legislature's willingness to consider a late filed bill, it might be pos- 
sible to obtain an act in 1966. 

It would also be possible, should the Town wish to accelerate the process of taking over the District, to 
accept an act at a special town meeting. In view of the importance of this matter to the Town, your Committee 
would be reluctant to see action taken at a special meeting. 

In the event that the proposed Home Rule amendment to our constitution is passed, the procedures for tak- 
ing over the District may be different. We understand that the question of approving the amendment will be on 
the November 1966 ballot. If the Home Rule amendment is adopted, the Legislature may have power to enact 
special legislation authorizing a merger of the Town and the District, after receiving a petition for such legisla- 
tion which had been approved at a town meeting. 

Item 3: In the view of your Committee, the most cogent reason for taking early action on a transfer, has to do 
with the admittedly larger voter representation at Town Meetings, as compared to meetings of the District. 
While it can be argued that the Water District meetings are no less open to all voters, it is nevertheless true 
that Water District Warrants are acted upon by relatively few of the Town's voters. 

One inference that may be drawn here is that the voters would prefer to have all the vital Town business 
presented to them in one package, to be acted on at the regular Town Meeting. 

In addition, it may fairly be said that matters acted upon by a well attended Town Meeting are more likely 
to be representative of the will of the voters than are matters acted upon by a small proportion of voters, regard- 
less of the factors which influence attendance at meetings. 

Although it is our understanding that equipment owned by the Water District is at times made available to 
Town Departments, it seems possible that more efficient use of such might be made if the District should become 
a part of a future Town Department of Public Works. 

Item 4: Factors which we feel would tend to favor continued separation of the Water District from the Town are 
these. Although we have not felt called upon to make a detailed financial analysis of the operations of the District, 
this Committee feels that it has been run in an efficient and business-like manner. 

As far as we are able to determine, the District has rendered satisfactory and courteous service to water 
users in the Town for many years, and continues to do so at the present time. 

Although the use of water has been restricted during the past three years, it is evident that much of the 
reason for this has been the prevailing drought which has effected New England as well as other parts of the 



78 



country. Certainly Acton's restrictions have been far less severe than those of many eastern Massachusetts 
communities. 

We believe that the Water District has been historically, a "tightly knit" operation of which the Commis- 
sioners and employees have been justifiably proud. It is quite possible that such a separate organization may be 
more of an asset, than would be the same or a similar group integrated into the over-all Town services. 

On the oft cited question of the lack of voter representation at the District meetings, there is no way of 
knowing for certain that this is not due to a confidence on the part of the citizenry, in the voting group which 
decides District business, and in the Water Commissioners themselves. 

Item 5: In the event that it is deemed advisable to absorb the Water District into the Town, the budget for a new 
Water Department would appear as an item in the Town Warrant under the usual article to "raise and appropri- 
ate" funds for general government. 

For the year 1965 the General Government budget for the Town was approximately $2,196,000.00. For the 
same year the Water District budget was about $132,000.00, or very nearly 6% of the Town budget. If this ratio 
remained unchanged after integration of the Water District into the Town, the annual General Government bud- 
get requests would increase by this percentage. 

It is to be noted however, that revenues and receipts accruing to the Town from the sale of water, would, 
if the rates remained unchanged with relation to costs, reimburse the Town 100%. 

The debts for which the District is liable at the time of a merger would be assumed by the Town, but the 
assumption of these debts would have no effect on the Town's legal ability to borrow money for other purposes. 
The Town would then do whatever borrowing might be necessary for its water system. 

Item 6: It is believed by your Committee that any wage differentials existing between the District and the Town, 
could in the event of a consolidation of thw two, be resolved in two ways. 

First, where jobs of directly comparable rating exist, the present Water District rate, if lower, could be 
increased to match the Town rate. Should the present vVater District rate be higher, any annual or step in- 
creases could be held in abeyance until the Town rate had caught up. 

Secondly, in cases where the Town does not now have classifications comparable to those of the Water Dis- 
trict, the Personnel Board would normally be expected to establish these, with wage rates appropriate to the 
responsibilities and the work involved. 

In the event that Water District rates should not coincide with the new Town rates, adjustments could be 
made as noted above. 

Item 7: It is the consensus of your Committee that the Town of Acton should take steps at sometime in the fore- 
seeable future to take over the Acton Water District. 

We do however, feel that such a move should be deferred until there is a clearly demonstrated need for 
making this change. We do not believe that this need has been shown to be an immediate one. 

In closing we would like to suggest that the citizens of the Town give careful consideration to questions 
touched on in this report and to such other questions as may arise in the future, before proceeding with the 
consolidation. 

Our Town Government is presently expanding at a rapid rate. Whether or not the best interests of Acton 
residents would be served by accelerating this expansion is the measure which should be used in arriving at a 
decision. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louis Flerra Donald Loring 

E. S. Hamilton John Maes 

February 25, 1966 Dana Hinckley, Chairman 

VOTED: To adjourn at 10:30 P. M., after completion of the article under discussion, to Monday, March 21, 1966 
at 7:30 P. M. 

VOTED: To take up Article 3 9. 

Article 39: LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Trustees of the Acton Memorial Library to apply for and to accept any 
federal or state aid in connection with the construction of an addition to the Library which was authorized by a 
vote of the Town passed June 8, 1964, and to ratify and confirm any application or contract for such aid hereto- 
fore made. 



79 



Article 5: UNIFORMS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept Section 6K of Chapter 40 of the General Laws which reads as follows: 

"Municipalities Authorized to Purchase Uniforms for Certain Public Health Nurses. A city or town which 
accepts this section may appropriate money for the purchase of uniforms for public health nurses employed by 
its board of health." 

Article 6: BYLAWS 

VOTED: To amend Section 7 of the Town Bylaws, entitled "Personnel Bylaw for Wage and Salary Determination 
and Administration", by removing in its entirety Section 9 (a) Non -Occupational Sick Leave and inserting "Sec- 
tion 9 (a) Non -Occupational Sick Leave -- All regular full time employees shall be credited with one (1) day of 
sick leave upon the completion of each month of service (or major fraction of a month) until the June 1 following 
the date of employment. The number of days credited as of June 1 of each year shall be available for use, if 
necessary, during the twelve (12) month period ending the following May 31. Sick leave not used in the year 
credited may be allowed to accumulate and be available for use, if necessary, during the twelve (12) month 
period ending the following May 31. This sick leave credit shall not exceed a maximum of twenty-four (24) days. 
For each day accumulated at the start of a single, continuous, prolonged illness a regular full time employee will 
receive three (3) days sick leave, if necessary, on recommendation of the department head, with a written state- 
ment from the employee's doctor of the nature of the illness and the probable duration thereof, and with the 
approval of the Personnel Board. Sick leave may be used only for illness or injury to the employee himself, and 
only while in the employ of the Town. No sick leave accumulations may be considered as a basis for payment 
upon termination of employment. In order to be eligible to be granted sick leave, the employee must notify his 
superior of his incapacity on the first day of absence, stating the nature of the sickness or injury, time expected 
to be incapacitated and when he expects to return to work. The supervisor is expected to check on such absences 
and to check with the doctor, and to obtain the doctor's certificate if in his judgment the situation demands such 
certification". 

Adjourned at 10:30 P. M. 

Monday, March 21, 1966, Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:30 P. M. 

Article 7: BYLAWS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend Section 7 of the Town Bylaws, entitled "Personnel Bylaw for Wage and Sal- 
ary Determination and Administration", by inserting in Schedule Bl "S-7 803 Engineering Assistant". 

Article 8: BYLAWS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend Section 7 of the Town Bylaws, entitled "Personnel Bylaw for Wage and Sal- 
ary Determination and Administration", by removing from Schedule CI "S-3 4206 Librarian (West Acton) (P.T.)" 
and inserting in Schedule CI "S-5 4206 Librarian (West Acton) (P.T.)" . 

Article 9: BYLAWS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend Section 7 of the Town Bylaws, entitled "Personnel Bylaw for Wage and Sal- 
ary Determination and Administration", by removing from Schedule Bl "J-4 3 906 Dump Laborer (Highways)" 
and inserting in Schedule Bl "J-5 3906 Dump Laborer (Highways)". 

Article 10: BUDGET 

VOTED: To amend Item #19 by striking out $2,650.00 and inserting $3,650.00, the additional $1,000.00 to be 
used to publish a list of property valuations. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 1966, recommended by the 
Finance Committee, to defray the expenses of the Town as indicated with each numbered item to be considered 
a separate appropriation: 

General Government 



Moderator: 

1. Salary 

2. Expenses 

Finance Committee: 

3. Expenses 

Selectmen: 

4. Salaries 

5. Expenses 

6. Capital Outlay 

7. Legal Services 



$ 160.00 
25.00 



200.00 



2,050.00 
3,600.00 

6,000.00 



Selectmen: (cont'd.) 

8. Legal Service Expenses 

9. Appraisals 

Town Office Clerical Staff: 

10. Salaries 

Engineering Department: 

11. Salaries & Wages 

12. Expenses 



$ 500.00 
1,000.00 



34,932.00 



14,794.00 
2,850.00 



80 



General Government (cont'd.) 



Protection of Persons and Property (cont'd.) 



Town Accountant: 

13. Salary 

14. Expenses 

Town Treasurer & Collector 

15. Salary 

16. Expenses 

17. Capital Outlay 

Town Assessors: 

18. Salaries 

19. Expenses 

20. Capital Outlay 

Town Clerk: 

21. Salary 

22. Expenses 

23. 1965 State Census 

Elections and Registration: 

24. Salaries k Wages 

25. Expenses 

Planning Board: 

26. Expenses 

Personnel Board: 

27. Expenses 

Board of Appeals: 

28. Expenses 

Industrial Development Commission: 

29. Expenses 

Conservation Commission: 

30. Expenses 

Archives Committee: 

31. Expenses 

Public Ceremonies & Celebrations 
Committee: 

32. Expenses 

Buildings & Grounds: 

33. Salaries & Wages 

34. Expenses 

35. Capital Outlay 

Town Report Committee: 

36. Expenses 



Moth Department: 



2, 


441. 


00 


45, Wages 




270. 


00 


46. Expenses 
Town Forest Committee: 


n 


268. 


00 


47. Maintenance 


3, 


200. 


00 






175. 


00 


Tree Department: 

48. Wages 

49. Expenses 


4, 


000. 


00 




3. 


650. 


00 


Wire Inspector: 




450. 


00 


50. Wages and Travel 

51. Expenses 


2, 


306. 


00 


Inspector of Gas Piping h 




500. 


00 


52. Wages 



828. 00 

000. 00 



1, 500. 00 

1, 300. 00 

25. 00 

250. 00 

200. 00 

25. 00 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT $123, 190. 00 
Protection of Persons and Property 



Police Department: 

37. Salaries & Wages 

38. Expenses 

39. Capital Outlay 

Fire Department: 

40. Salaries & Wages 

41. Expenses 

42. Capital Outlay 

Sealer of Weights & Measures: 

43. Salary and Travel 

44. Expenses 



13, 



89, 
36, 

1. 



500. 00 
500. 00 



483. 00 
375. 00 
410. 00 



53. Expenses 

Building Inspector &; Agent for 
Enforcement of Zoning Bylaws: 

54. Salary & Wages 

55. Expenses 

Dog Officer: 

56. Wages and Travel 

57. Expenses 

Building Committee: 

58. Expenses 

Civil Defense: 

59. Expenses 

TOTAL PROTECTION OF 
PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

HIGHWAYS 

60. Salary 

61. Expenses 

62. Street Lighting 

63. Capital Outlay 



1, 


000. 


00 


TOTAL HIGHWAYS 


8, 


861. 


00 


HEALTH & Si 


7, 


060. 


00 




2, 


300. 


00 


Health and Sanitation: 

64. Salaries 

65. Expenses 


2. 


470. 


00 


66. Garbage Collection 



390. 00 
65. 00 



Inspector of Animals: 

67. Wages 

68. Expenses 

Plumbing Inspector: 

69. Wages 

TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 



CHARITIES 

District &t Local Welfare: 

70. Administration Salaries 

71. Public Assistance 

TOTAL CHARITIES 



$ 3, 915. 00 
2, 000. 00 



100. 00 



3, 610. 00 
1. 900. 00 



2, 200. 00 
25. 00 



1, 500. 00 



7, 295. 00 
1, 150. 00 



558. 00 
50. 00 



50. 00 



400. 00 



$254, 476. 00 



$ 60, 265. 00 

93, 065. 00 

16, 500. 00 

4. 165. 00 

$173, 995. 00 



13, 717. 00 
12, 135. 00 
21. 750. 00 



160. 00 
30. 00 



2. 500. 00 
$ 50, 292. 00 



$ 200. 00 
50, OOP. 00 

$ 50, 200. 00 



81 



VETERANS AID 



INSURANCE 



Veterans Services: 



72. 


Salary 


$ 1, 


915. 


00 


73. 


Expenses 




275. 


00 


74. 


Aid 


8, 


500. 


00 


TOTAL VETERANS AID 


$ 10, 


690. 


00 




EDUCATION 








Local 


Schools: 








75. 


Instruction 


$550, 


276. 


00 


76. 


Plant Operation & 










Maintenance 


39, 


452. 


00 


77. 


Transportation 


66, 


050. 


00 


78. 


Non-Instructional Services 


8, 


200. 


00 


79. 


Administration 


14, 


450. 


00 


80. 


Blanchard Auditorium 


10, 


500. 


00 


81. 


Capital Outlay 


3, 


673. 


00 


82. 


Contingency 


1, 


000. 


00 



Total Local Schools 



Regional Schools: 



$693, 601. 00 



83. 


Instruction 


$524, 


187. 


00 


84. 


Plant Operation & 










Maintenance 


70, 


030. 


00 


85. 


Transportation 


19, 


942. 


00 


86. 


Non-Instructional Services 


17. 


112. 


00 


87. 


Administration 


15, 


061. 


00 


88. 


Blanchard Auditorium 


5, 


757. 


00 


89. 


Capital Outlay 


3, 


205. 


00 


90. 


Athletic Fund 


7, 


303. 


00 


91. 


Contingency Fund 




902. 


00 



Total Regional Schools 



TOTAL EDUCATION 



LIBRARIES 



Memorial Library: 

92. Salary k Wages 

93. Expenses 

94. Books 

95. Capital Outlay 

West Acton Library: 

96. Salary & Wages 

97. Expenses 



TOTAL LIBRARIES 



RECREATION 



Playgrounds: 

98. Wages 

99. Expenses 
100. Capital Outlay 

TOTAL RECREATION 



CEMETERIES 



Cemeteries: 

101. Salaries & Wages 

102. Expenses 

103. Capital Outlay 

TOTAL CEMETERIES 



$663. 499. 00 
,1, 357, 100.00 



15, 836. 00 

5, 410. 00 

10, 000. 00 



1, 078. 00 
675. 00 

32, 999. 00 



4, 153. 00 
1, 350. 00 
1, 110. 00 

6. 613. 00 



21, 013. 00 

4, 270. 00 

830. 00 

26. 113. 00 



Insurance: 

104. Workmen's Compensation 

105. Surety Bond 

106. Fire Insurance for Town 

Buildings 

107. Boiler and Machinery 

108. Motor Vehicle Liability 

109. Money and Securities 

110. Group Health 

111. Fire Fighters Insurance 

112. Public Liability 

TOTAL INSURANCE 



5, 500. 00 
635. 00 

8, 775. 00 
800. 00 

3, 750. 00 

9, 500. 00 
390. 00 

1, 150. 00 



$ 30, 500. 00 



PENSIONS 

Pension Fund: 

113. Expense 

TOTAL PENSION 

MATURING DEBT AND 

Regional School: 

114. Maturing Debt 

115. Interest 

Julia McCarthy School: 

116. Maturing Debt 

117. Interest 

Julia McCarthy School Addition: 

118. Maturing Debt 

119. Interest 

Florence E. Merriam School: 

120. Maturing Debt 

121. Interest 

South Acton Fire Station: 

122. Maturing Debt 

123. Interest 

Chapters 81 & 90 Highways: 

124. Maturing Debt 

125. Interest 

New Elementary School Land: 

126. Maturing Debt 

127. Interest 

New Elementary School: 

128. Maturing Debt 

129. Interest 

Police Station: 

130. Maturing Debt 

131. Interest 

Library Addition: 

132. Maturing Debt 

133. Interest 

Anticipation of Revenue Notes: 

134. Interest 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT 
AND INTEREST 



$ 18.000.00 
$ 18, 000. 00 
INTEREST 



$ 16, 092. 05 
82, 996. 75 



15, 000. 00 
1. 900. 00 



10, 000. 00 
520. 00 



40, 000. 00 
17, 280. 00 



12, 000. 00 
300. 00 



23, 350. 00 
642. 13 



37, 000. 00 
25, 375. 00 



20, 000. 00 
2, 240. 00 



25, 000. 00 
6, 000. 00 



3. 500. 00 



$ 339, 196. 00 



GRAND TOTAL 



$2, 473, 364. 00 



82 



Special Articles 

Article 12. New Way (from High Street) $ 6,900.00 

Article 13. Sidewalks 2, 500. 00 

Article 16. Surplus Government Property 3, 000. 00 

Article 18. Snow Fighting Equipment . 17,800.00 

Article 21. Lease - Haartz Property 12,000.00 

Article 23. Cemetery Building 37,260.00 

Article 24. Elementary School (Elm St. #2) 30, 000. 00 

Article 26. Sewerage Study Committee 300. 00 

Article 27. M. B.T.A. 6,600.00 

Article 29. Replace Flag Pole, Repair Monument 890. 00 

Article 30. Fogging Generator 2,220.00 

Article 31. Board of Health - Walden Guidance Assn., Inc. 4, 000. 00 

Article 32. 2 Police Cruisers 4, 000. 00 

Article 33. Water Safety Program 3,870.00 

Article 34. Fence - Gardiner Playground 750. 00 

Article 35. Vocational Tuition 2, 000. 00 



TOTAL TO BE RAISED AND APPROPRIATED 
UNDER SPECIAL ARTICLES 



$134, 090. 00 



Transfers 



Article 14. 

Article 15. 

Article 24. 

Article 36. 

Article 36. 

Article 38. 



From 

Surplus Revenue 

Surplus Revenue 
Available Funds 
Overlay Surplus 
Free Cash 
Free Cash 



To 

Construction: Hosmer, 
Prospect & Charter 
Highways 

Elementary School 
Reserve Fund 
Reserve Fund 
Stabilization Fund 



$ 16, 444. 95 

44, 600. 00 

30, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 

5, 000. 00 

100. 000. 00 



TOTAL TRANSFERS 
GRAND TOTAL 



$206. 044. 95 



$2. 813, 498. 95 



Article 11; BORROW MONEY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen to bor- 
row money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning January 1, 1966 and 
to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year in accordance with Section 17, Chapter 44, General Laws. 

Article 12: CHAPTER 90 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $6,900.00 for Chapter 90 Construction on a new 
way running from High Street, approximately at the intersection of Adams Street, and extending in a southeast- 
erly direction to Powder Mill Road, and on Central Street from Richardson's Crossing 1275 feet in a southerly 
direction, said money to be used in conjunction with $6,900.00 to be allotted by the County and $13,800.00 to be 
allotted by the State. 

Article 13: SIDEWALKS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500.00, for the continuing construction of the 
trunk sidewalk system. 

Article 14: HIGHWAYS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from Surplus Revenue the sum of $16,444.95 for the purpose of new 
highway construction on Hosmer Street, Prospect Street and Charter Road in accordance with Chapter 679 of 
the Acts of 1965, provided that the payments from the State under said Chapter 679 shall be used to replace the 
funds appropriated and spent hereunder. 

Article 15: HIGHWAYS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate f^'om the Surplus Revenue Account the sum of $44,600.00, the amount 
of the State's and County's allotments for highways under Chapters 81 and 90; provided that the reimbursement 
be credited back to the Surplus Revenue Account. 



83 



Article 16. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000.00 to be used by the Board of Selectmen 
for the purchase and conditioning of surplus government property for the various Town Departments as the same 
becomes available. 

Article 17: HIGHWAY 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $32,000.00 
or any other sum, for the purchase of a new grader for the Highway Department, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 18: HIGHWAY 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $17,800.00, for the purchase of additional snow fighting equipment. 

Article 19: ARLINGTON STREET 

To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control of all or any part of the land 
on Arlington Street held by the School Committee for school purposes and acquired pursuant to action taken under 
Articles 7 and 8 of the Warrant for the 1962 Annual Town Meeting to the Board of Selectmen for another specific 
municipal purpose, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 

Article 20; BUILDING -LAND ACQUISITION STUDY 

VOTED: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint a Town Building-Land Acquisition Committee to study 
the space requirements of the various Departments, Boards, Commissions and Committees of the Town to eval- 
uate and anticipate the needs of the Town for buildings and land and to propose a co-ordinated program of 
acquisition, both general and specific, in order that there may be a planned growth of the physical -administrative 
facilities of the Town. 

Article 21: HAARTZ LAND 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $.12,000.00 to allow the Board of Selectmen to enter into a suitable 
lease of certain land with the building thereon, owned by Haartz Auto Fabric Co., situated on the northerly side 
of Hayward Road and on the westerly side of Route 2, to be used as a garage and shop for Town equipment and to 
provide office space for several Town Departments. 

Article 22: OFFICE SPACE 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $6,000.00, 
or any other sum, to provide additional office space at the Town Hall for several Town Departments, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 

Article 23: CEMETERY 

VOTED: To authorize the Town Building Committee to enter into contracts on behalf of the Town for construct- 
ing, equipping and furnishing a combination garage and office building for the Cemetery Department in that part 
of Acton called Acton Center, said building to be erected on land owned by said Town on Concord Road, Acton, 
Massachusetts, and to raise and appropriate the sum of $37,260.00 for said purpose. 

VOTED: To adjourn to Monday, March 28, 1966 at 7:30 P. M. 

Monday, March 28, 1966, Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:30 P. M. 

Article 24: ELM STREET SCHOOL 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $30,000.00 and appropriate from available funds 
an additional sum of $30,000.00, these monies to be expended by the Town Building Committee for the purpose of 
hiring an architect, for the purpose of making architectural working drawings for a contemplated elementary 
school to be located on Elm Street on land owned by the Town. 

Article 25: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint an administrative assistant and raise 
and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $6,000.00, or any other sum, for the salary 
for such administrative assistant, or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

84 



Article 26: SEWERAGE STUDY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the amount of $300.00 to be used by the Sewerage Study Com- 
mittee to defray its costs. 

Article 27: RAILROAD 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $6,600.00 to be used by the Board of Selectmen to continue the con- 
tract to provide railroad transportation services to the Town of Acton. 

Article 28: VETERANS MEMORIAL 

VOTED: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint a committee of three to study and make recommendations 
on a suitable memorial to the Veterans of the Town and report to the Town at the next Annual Town Meeting. 

Article 29: FLAG POLE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $890.00 for the replacement of the existing flag 
pole on the Isaac Davis Monument and for the repair of the stone cap on said monument. 

Article 30: FOGGING GENERATOR 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,220.00 for the purchase of a fogging generator 
with reraote control. 

Article 31: WALDEN CLINIC 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $4,000.00 to be expended under the direction of the Board of Health 
for providing co-operative or complementary facilities to the out-patient clinic of the Walden Guidance Associa- 
tion, Inc. established in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 123 of the General Laws, in co-operation with 
the Department of Mental Health and for providing payment for services rendered or to be rendered by such clinic, 
and will join with other communities in providing payment for services rendered or to be rendered by such clinic, 
under Clause 40C of Section 5 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws. 

Article 32: POLICE CRUISERS 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $4,000.00 for the purchase of two police cruisers and authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to trade in, sell, or otherwise dispose of the present cruisers. 

Article 33: WATER SAFETY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,870.00 for the support of the Water Safety Pro- 
gram which is jointly sponsored by the School Department, the Walden District Water Safety Council and the 
Acton Recreation Commission. 

Article 34: FENCE 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $750.00 for a fence around a part of the playground at Gardiner 
Field, West Acton. 

Article 35: VOCATIONAL TUITION 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 for the payment of vocational tuition and transportation 
according to the provisions of Chapter 74 of the General Laws. 

Article 3 6: RESERVE FUND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate $10,000.00 from Overlay Surplus and appropriate $5,000.00 from Free 
Cash, for a Reserve Fund, pursuant to the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6. 

Article 37: BUDGET 

To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and transfer a sum of money from Free Cash to be used by the 
Assessors in considering and fixing the tax rate for the current year, or take any other action relative thereto. 
(Inserted by Finance Committee.) 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 38: STABILIZATION FUND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate $100,000.00 from Free Cash for a Stabilization Fund, pursuant to the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 5B. 



85 



Article 40: CIVIL DEFENSE: 

To see if the Town will accept the provisions of the General Laws, Section IIB of the Civil Defense Act as in- 
serted by Chapter 401 of the Acts of 1956 relating to the indemnification of civil defense volunteers for liabilities 
arising out of the operation of municipal motor vehicles on municipal business, or take any other action relative 
thereto. (Inserted by Civil Defense Agency.) 

No action taken. 

Article 41: ZONING ■ 

To amend the protective zoning bylaw of the Town of Acton and the 'Zoning Map of the Town of Acton' by chang- 
ing from Residential (R 2) to General Business District B the following described area of land in that part of 
Acton called South Acton, located on the Westerly side of Main Street, bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the Westerly side of Main Street at the Maynard-Acton Town Line, thence running 

NORTHWESTERLY along the Westerly side line of said Main Street, two thousand one hundred sixty 

(2, 160) feet, more or less, to the Southerly side line of Pine Street, thence turning 
and running 

WESTERLY along the Southerly side line of Pine Street, and the projection thereof, five hundred 

sixty-one (561) feet, more or less, to land of the Boston & Maine Railroad, thence 
turning and running 

SOUTHEASTERLY by land of the Boston & Maine Railroad, two thousand two hundred forty-four (2,244) 
feet, more or less, to the point of beginning. 

Containing 13.3 acres, more or less. 

or take any other action relative thereto. (Inserted on petition signed by Joseph A. Nastasi and nineteen other 
residents.) 

VOTED: To take no action. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 10:20 P. M. 



A true copy. Attest: CHARLES M. MacRAE 

Town Clerk 



86 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, JUNE 6, 1966 



Article 1: CONSERVATION FUND 

VOTED: To appropriate from Free Cash the sum of $11,000.00 to be placed in the Conservation Fund. 

Article 2: CONSERVATION LAND 

To see if the Town will authorize the Conservation Commission to purchase, or otherwise acquire, on behalf of 
the Town for conservation purposes a parcel of land containing 22.76 acres located in North Acton and believed 
to belong to the Pope Road Land Trust, which parcel is shown as Lot 4 on a plan of the Spring Hill Tract, Acton, 
recorded with the Middlesex South Registry of Deeds (Book 10861, Page 50) and authorize the Treasurer to make 
payment therefor from the Conservation Fund, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take affirmative action provided that the seller also grants a right of access to the parcel which is 
sufficient in the opinion of the Conservation Commission to serve the purposes for which the land is to be acquired. 

Article 3: ZONING 

To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Acton, by adding the following subclause (i) to Article IV 
(B) (2): 

(i) Recreational uses (which are not permitted as of right as accessory uses), whether for profit or 
non-profit, as follows: 

1) Indoor or outdoor swimming facilities. 

2) Indoor or outdoor tennis facilities. 

3) Golf courses, but excluding the use of artificial lights, and excluding golf driving ranges, pitch 
and putt facilities and miniature golf. 

4) Riding stables. 

5) Indoor or outdoor skating facilities 

provided that prior to the hearing of the Board of Appeals on the requested special permit, written 
recommendations of the Recreation Commission and the Planning Board have been submitted with 
respect to the proposed use. 

In issuing any permit within this subsection (i), the Board of Appeals shall impose such safe- 
guards, conditions and limitations pertaining to the use in question as may, in the reasonable opinion 
of the members of said Board, be necessary or advisable to prevent such permitted use from being 
either detrimental or injurious to the neighborhood or to the value of any property within the neigh- 
borhood, or to prevent such permitted use from substantially detracting from the residential appear- 
ance of the neighborhood. 

Any such permitted use may be limited to a specified period of time and may, at the expiration 
of said period, be extended for a further specified period, after notice and a public hearing. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

MOTION: To take affirmative action. 

VOTED: To amend original motion by adding the word "ice" after "outdoor" in Item 5. 

Original MOTION, as amended, LOST. 

Article 4: BYLAW 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Building Bylaw by adding to Section 4 the following: 

B. After construction of the foundation or slab, a plot plan, prepared by a registered land surveyor, 
certifying the location of the foundation or slab shall be submitted to the Building Inspector prior 
to the continuation of any construction. The plot plan shall show offsets, to the nearest foot, to all 
property lines and street lines. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

MOTION: To take favorable action. 



^ 



87 



i/ 



MOTION LOST. 

VOTED: To take up Article 8. 

Article 8: SEWERAGE STUDY 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the special report of the Sewerage Study Committee, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

SEWERAGE STUDY COMMITTEE FINAL REPORT 
JUNE 1966 

Introduction 

The Sewerage Study Committee was authorized by Article 30 of the 1964 Annual Town Meeting. The motion 
to create a five -man Sewerage Study Committee, one member to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen, two 
members by the Board of Health, and two members by the Planning Board; said committee to undertake studies 
on the needs for sewerage projects as assigned by the Town or the Board of Selectmen was voted after a motion 
from the floor to change the appointments was defeated. The initial appointments were Paul R. Nyquist (by 
Board of Selectmen), Bruce D. Smith, Robert J. Ellis (by Board of Health), Alton B. Avery and H. Raymond 
Durling, Jr. (by Planning Board). Mr. Avery and Mr. Smith resigned because of the press of other business 
and were replaced by Dr. James S. Winston and Mr. E. Patrick, respectively. 

The reader of this report is going to see two words used many times and they should be defined for clarity. 
Sewage is the contents of a sewer or drain consisting of refuse liquids or matter being carried off by sewers. 
On the other hand, sewerage is the act or process of removal of sewage and surface water by sewers such as a 
system of sewers in a city or town. 

The Need 

The Town of Acton has maintained an orderly expansion as the population of the Town has grown from 
3,510 in the year 1950 to over 7,238 in 1960. The population has increased to over 10,000 in the past five years 
and estimates for the year 1970 consider the population to be at least 13,000 persons. 

The major growth in population is occurring in the areas South and West of Mass. Highway Route 2, fanning 
out from the population centers of West Acton and South Acton. This area is otherwise defined as the Fort Pond 
Drainage Area and continuing house construction surrounding the Fort Pond Brook is converting the area into a 
densely populated urban area. 

According to a recent Planning Board study, over 72% of the Town population is located in the Fort Pond 
Drainage Area. About 50± or half of the Town population is located in West Acton on approximately 3,267 acres 
or 24.4% of the total Town land area. At present the bulk of new house construction is being done in this area. 

The Fort Pond Drainage Area is presently being developed in accordance with the zoning bylaws. The need 
for the construction of a sewerage system in this area was defined in the master plan but, unfortunately, the area 
has been largely developed before the more stringent intensity regulations recommended in the master plan were 
adopted. There are, and have been, problems with household sewage disposal systems in this area, and every 
indication suggests that there will be a steady increase. 

What are the sewage disposal problems in the Fort Pond Drainage Area and the Town of Acton? 

1. Owners of some older homes do not have sufficient land area to construct adequate household sewage 
disposal systems. Many of the older homes have been converted to multiple family dwellings which further 
taxes their overage sewage disposal systems. In 1957, representatives of the State Health Department performed 
dye tests on certain homes in South Acton, particularly on River Street and School Street. Of the 24 houses 
tested, 15 reflected a direct dye route from the plumbing fixture to Fort Pond Brook. 

2. Several of the new homes are occupied by large families (6-10 children), and in some instances more 
than one of the children may be in diapers. These conditions compound an already connplex problem. Owners 

of some newer homes on 20,000 square feet lots have expanded household sewerage disposal systems to the extent 
that the total available land within the property lines has been used. Extreme soil conditions, such as ledge or 
swamp, may further restrict relocation or expansion of the present inadequate systems. 

3. Of the failures in household sewage disposal systems, for which repair permits were issued in the year 
1960 to 1963 inclusive, 78% were in the Fort Pond Drainage Area. In 1964, 50%, and in 1965 60%, of the house- 
hold disposal system repairs were in the West Acton-Fort Pond Brook area. 

4. All failures reported, occurred in those areas not recommended for sub -surface sewage disposal by the 
recent soils survey. According to the results of this survey, only 15.1% of the land area of the Town of Acton 

is suitable (See Attachment I). 

5. The pollution of Fort Pond Brook is caused by inadequately treated household sewage, or in several 
cases, absolutely no treatment at all. 



6. School construction and other municipal buildings cannot be located where needed, but must be built 
where land is adequate for sewage disposal, and then there are excessive costs for individual unit waste disposal 
systems. 

WHEN are the problems in household sewage disposal systems going to need relief by a Town sewerage 
system? 

1. The average life of a household sewage disposal system is considered to be from 10 to 15 years. 

2. Failures in household systems will increase as more individual systems are constructed; soils will 
become saturated and unable to receive additional waste water. This condition is especially prevalent in the 
spring season of the year. 

3. Failures in household sewage disposal systemis, for which repair permits were issued, have increased 
each year since 1960. In 1963, 40 pernaits were issued representing a 90% increase over 1962. The continued 
drouth is evidenced by the decreasing permits for repair -- 28 in 1964, 18 in 1965, and 6 so far in 1966. 

4. All failures are not reported, but at the rate reflected in the records, the minimum number expected 
in 1970 would be 140. 

5. A high percentage of the failures in household sewage disposal systems, by the year 1970, will be 
beyond repair or relocation. A town sewage disposal system will be necessary to serve the Fort Pond Drainage 
Area. 

Where does an enforcement agency now begin to correct the situation? 

Is the direct pollution without space for expansion a greater or lesser degree of violation of Health Board 
standards than the faulty leach area which exudes raw sewage on the ground? 

Does the enforcement agency inspect for raw sewage adjacent to a leach area after three continuous 
extreme drouth years or during a year of normal rainfall? 

What liability does the Town of Acton have and what public image will emerge when adequate health stan- 
dards are strictly enforced on a resident of 6 months living in a 6 year old house whose leach area is obviously 
deficient? 

The schools have not been designed and/or built in the most desirable locations because of unavailability of 
suitable land. One tract of land now sits idle on Arlington Street which has cost the Town $39,250.00. The two 
schools just completed have disposal systems which cost the Town a total of $30,000.00. Further, there is a 
major repair required on the elementary school's waste disposal system estimated to cost upward of $15,000.00. 
The maintenance required on the high school system in the form of frequent pumping is becoming alarmingly 
expensive. 

The Committee felt more details and statistics were necessary to support this study effort. After several 
months of deliberation and discussion with various Town committees and officials, a questionnaire was carefully 
compiled which considered the comments gleaned from the several meetings. At this time the Committee extends 
its appreciation to those members of the Board of Health and the League of Women Voters who gave their time in 
assisting to formulate the questions that were used. It was desired to assimilate data from a concise group of 
questions which could be easily responded to by the homeowner without occupying his valuable time in study and 
research. These questions had to be specific in subject and general in nature so that all answers would have the 
same weight independent of the area of town or whether the husband or wife replied. 

When all of the details of composing, formatting, and printing were accomplished, the questionnaires were 
bundled and taken to the post offices on 4 June 1965. The normal voter mailing requires approximately 3,000 
units; however, the "printer" shorted our request so we could send only 2,739. The shortages were distributed 
among the three post offices. 

The returns were heavy and exceeded the returns normally anticipated from this type of poll or question- 
naire. Eight hundred ninety-three (893) responses were received which reflects a 32.6% return. It further is 
interesting to note that of these responses, 373 took time to write a note or comment. The response to each 
particular question follows: 

YES NO 

1. Do you believe that the presence of raw sewage presents 

a danger to the health of Actonians? 646 189 

2. Has a member of your family had hepatitis while living 

in Acton? 22 859 

3. Have you seen or smelled evidence of sewage on the surface 

of the ground in your neighborhood? 452 420 



89 



427 


247 


304 


247 


168 


325 



YES NO 

4. Do you know of any septic system failures, such as: 

Overflow at leach field 
Backed-up into house 
Evidence in a stream 

5. What type of sewage system do you have at your residence: 

Cesspool 226 

Septic tank 695 

Other 15 

6. How often do you have it cleaned? 

1 year 117 

2 years 222 

3 years 162 
More 251 

7. Do you believe that there is a problem in proper sewage 

disposal in Acton? 564 228 

8. Remarks: 

It should be noted that no attempt is made to correlate totals of any specific questions with the total returns 
because several persons did not complete the questionnaire in every detail. 

In analyzing the remarks, the committee grouped or categorized the statements so as to try to provide a 
meaningful statistical summary. The individuals who wrote remarks may find it difficult to understand into 
which group their comments were counted. In reviewing such a volume of comments the analysis decision was 
many times difficult to make. 

a. Concern about: 

(1) Population growth 19 

(2) Soil conditions in Acton 6 

(3) Unrestrained building of houses 4 

(4) Sewage problems 52 

(5) Stream pollution 15 

(6) Water shortage 6 

(7) Cost of sewerage 18 

b. Critical about: 

(1) Town government 36 

(2) Installation of septic systems 15 

(3) The questionnaire 22 

(4) A sewerage system for Acton 14 

c. Interest in: 

(1) Sewerage for Acton as soon as possible 92 

(2) Sewerage for Acton eventually 11 

(3) Limitation of building of houses 3 

The need for a sewerage system for the Town of Acton was summarized for attachment to the Application 
for Advance for Public Works Planning (CFA-401): "There exists today a sewage disposal problem in the Fort 
Pond Brook drainage basin, particularly in South and West Acton. During the past few years the local Board of 
Health has received numerous complaints of malfunctioning septic tank systems in the area. Evidences of sani- 
tary sewage pollution have also been observed in Fort Pond Brook at certain times of the year. 

It is expected that development will continue in these areas. It appears that the only permanent solution to 
the existing problem is a public sewerage system. Such a system would not only eliminate present pollution of 
Fort Pond Brook originating in Acton but would also avoid future pollution by providing sewer service for new 
areas in the basin as they are developed. 

Some minor pollution is also in evidence in Nashoba Brook but not of the same magnitude as Fort Pond 
Brook. 

The water supply system of the Town of Acton is adequate to operate the proposed sewerage system." 

Committee Actions 

Article 3 1 of the 1964 Annual Town Meeting defined or authorized action of the committee by voting to 
authorize the Sewerage Study Committee to make application to the United States of America under the terms of 
Public Law 560, 83rd Congress of the United States, as amended, for an advance of funds not to exceed $30,000.00 
and to expand the same for surveys, preliminary plans, cost estimates and reports on a town sewerage system in 



90 



all its various phases with the understanding that the Town will reimburse the United States, at no interest, for 
that part of the cost proportioned to a particular sewerage project when the construction of that project is sub- 
sequently voted by the Town, said plans and reports to be rendered by an engineer selected and employed by the 
Sewerage Study Committee, said funds or so much thereof that may be required and advanced from the United 
States to be received by and administered by the Town Treasurer under the direction of the Sewerage Study 
Committee. 

In order for the Committee to prepare this application, the Information for Applicants (CFA-400) was 
scrutinized and the following pertinent points noted: 

"The Housing and Home Finance Administrator is authorized by the Congress to make interest-free, 
repayable advances of funds to States, municipalities and other local public agencies to aid in financing the cost 
of plan preparation for specific public works projects. The primary purpose of the program is through this 
assistance to encourage municipalities and other public agencies to maintain at all times a current and adequate 
reserve of properly planned public works which can readily be placed under construction. 

The Act specifically provides that - 

(1) The making of an advance will not in any way commit the Federal Government to appropriate funds 
to assist in financing the construction of any public work so planned. 

(2) Advances will be repaid without interest by the applicant when construction is started. 

(3) If a public agency starts construction of only a portion of a planned public work, it will repay such 
proportionate amount of the advance as the Housing and Home Finance Administrator may determine 
to be equitable. 

(4) If an advance is not repaid promptly upon the start of construction, interest at the rate of four per 
centum per annum will be charged." 

The Application for Advance for Public Works Planning (C FA -401) clearly defines the Town's obligation 
under this application. 

"The applicant requests the United States of America to advance $30,000.00 under Public Law 560, 83rd 
Congress, as amended by P. L. 345, 84th Congress, to aid in financing the cost of plan preparation for the 
public work project described in Item 4. 

The applicant represents that it will make every possible effort to have available, when needed, sufficient 
funds to defray the cost of constructing such public works; that the data in support of this application for an 
advance are true, correct, and complete; that the filing of this application has been duly authorized by its 
governing body; that the undersigned officer has been duly authorized by formal action of said governing body 
to file this application for and in behalf of the applicant, to provide to the United States such additional informa- 
tion and documents as may be required and otherwise to act as the authorized representative of the applicant in 
connection with this application; and that a certified copy of the instrument evidencing such authorization is 
hereby made a part of this application." 

The Agreement for Public Works Plan Preparation (CFA-420) was initiated by Housing and Home Finance 
Agency on 17 June 1965 and signed by the Chairman of the Selectmen on 10 August 1965. The Town's obligation 
to repay was defined. 

"11. The advance shall be repaid promptly upon the start of construction of the public work contemplated 
in the planning report. Construction shall be considered as undertaken or started when the first construction 
contract is awarded or the applicant begins construction with its own forces. If construction of only a portion 
of the planned work is undertaken, repayment is required of such proportionate amount of the advance related 
to the work as the Administrator determines to be equitable. 

12. In the event the applicant should, for any reason, fail to repay promptly the advance in full in accord- 
ance with its obligation under this Agreement, whether such obligation shall arise by operation of law or under 
the said Agreement, such unpaid sum shall bear interest at the rate of four per centum per annum from the date 
of the Government's demand to the applicant for the repayment to the date of payment thereof by the applicant." 

As a preliminary step to selection of a consulting engineer to conduct the detailed sewerage report, eleven 
(11) engineering firms were interviewed. Out of these interviews, four (4) Boston organizations were selected 
as warranting a detailed plant or office survey. The firm of Metcalf and Eddy was finally selected. However, a 
contract could not be consumated until allocation of Federal funds under Public Law 560, 83rd Congress, as 
amended by P. L. 345, 84th Congress, was granted. Following the notice of advance of funds 17 June 1965, the 
firm of Metcalf and Eddy was awarded a contract in the amount of $16,000 for the performance of an engineering 
survey. An aerial mapping service submitted a proposal to perform Photogrammetric services necessary to 
product topographic maps of the Town of Acton as required for the engineering study. The proposal indicated 
that the services would be provided for in excess of $11,000. Research on the part of a committee member re- 
vealed that aerial photographs of Acton were available from a Federal Government Agency. The photographs 
were secured, and a professional cartographic firm (Crudale and Bemis) was retained to produce the required 
topographic maps at less than half the cost contained in the original proposal. Further, the topographic maps 

91 



being produced are fully coordinated with the Assessor's Atlas prepared by the Town Engineer. The total con- 
tracted obligation of the Town for the Sewerage Study is now $21,500, whereas the advance of funds from the 
Federal Government was in the amount of $30,000. 

The Federal and State financial assistance applicable to construction of a sewerage system are included 
in three laws or proposed laws: 

P. L. 660 30% up to $1,200,000 for treatment plant, effluent outfall, pumping 

station, and intercepting sewers. 

P. L. 89-117 50% of basic sewer system beyond P. L. 660. The definition of a 

basic sewer system, as presented by H.U.D. New York City, does 
not come up to our expectations; however, town counsel is looking 
into this further. We applied for funds under this law by letter 
application in September of 1965, and solicited congressional sup- 
port which was acknowledged. 

Mass. House 3426 Is being acted upon now and will offer another 30% of construction 
costs from State funds. 

The consulting engineer has prepared a detailed preliminary project design report which is considered 
an attachment to this report. The summary is reprinted herein: 

As a result of our investigations, we present the following conclusions and recommendations: 

1. There are no public sewerage facilities in Acton. All properties depend on private systems for dis- 
posal of sewage consisting of either cesspools, septic tank -leaching field systems, or direct connec- 
tions from septic tanks to a watercourse or storm drain. 

2. Subsoil surveys conducted by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service indicate that only about 15 percent of 
area of the Town has soil suitable for disposal of sewage effluent by absorption into the ground. The 
closeness to the ground surface of hardpan, ledge, or groundwater hinder the operation of many pri- 
vate systems. Malfunctioning systems are being continually reported to the Town Board of Health. 

3. The population of Acton is increasing at a very rapid rate, having grown from 3,510 in 1950 to 10,188 
in 1965. 

4. The combination of poor subsoil conditions and rapidly increasing population must inevitably lead to 
the construction of a public sewerage system as the only economical method to maintain good sanitary 
conditions and protect the public health in the town. 

5. We recommend the construction of a single sewage treatment plant located near the intersection of 
Route 2 and School Street just west of the Acton-Concord town line. 

6. We recommend that the sewage treatment plant be of the extended-aeration activated-sludge type and 
be capable of initially handling an average rate of flow of 1.0 mgd. (million gallons per day). Suffi- 
cient area should be acquired to enable plant expansion to an ultimate capacity of about 5.0 mgd. 

7. In order to avoid nuisance conditions in Fort Pond Brook and Warners Pond in Concord, the State 
Health Department will require that the treatment plant effluent be discharged directly to the Assabet 
River and that it be chlorinated throughout the year. 

8. To convey effluent to the Assabet River will require a pressure sewer about 1.2 miles long in the 
present Route 2 right-of-way. Approval from the State Highway Department will be required for this 
installation. 

9. A sewer collection system will be required to collect and convey sewage to the treatment site. The 
backbone of this system would consist of the Fort Pond Brook and Nashoba Brook Intercepting Sewers. 
Each of these sewers would be located generally along the valley generally near the stream and in 
streets where feasible and economical. 

10. The Fort Pond Brook Interceptor would terminate at a pump station near the intersection of School 
Street and Laws Brook Road. 

11. Similarly, the Nashoba Brook Interceptor would terminate at a pump station located near the inter- 
section of Route 2 and the Acton -Concord town line. 

12. At each pump station the sewage would be pumped through a force main to the treatment plant. 

13. In order to avoid excessive initial expenditures, we recommend that the sewerage system be built in 
phases. 



92 



14. As the greatest present need for sewerage is in the Fort Pond Brook district, we recommend that 
sewer construction be concentrated in this district and that the Nashoba Brook Interceptor and Pump 
Station be deferred from the early construction program. 

15. We recommend that the two smaller sewer drainage districts, the Assabet River and Spencer Brook 
districts, be served by small pump stations and force mains which will convey the sewage from each 
district into the adjacent larger district. 

16. Phase I, the start of the sewer construction program is estimated to cost about $3,103,000 and would 
require four years to design and construct. Included in this phase would be the effluent outfall, the 
treatment plant, the Fort Pond Brook Pump Station and force main, the Fort Pond Brook Interceptor 
Sewer as far west as Stow Street in South Acton, and lateral sewers. We stimate that this project 
would be eligible for about $842,000 in Federal grants. 

17. Phase II of the program is estimated to cost about $2,460,000 and would be completed by the ninth 
year, assuming design for Phase II were started soon after the beginning of the fourth year of Phase 
I. Included in this phase would be the extension of the Fort Pond Interceptor westerly to near Arling- 
ton Street in West Acton, the Kelley Corner Main Sewer westerly to the school complex at Charter 
Road and lateral sewers. We estimate that this project would be eligible for about $758,000 in Feder- 
al grants. 

18. Phase III of the program is estimated to cost about $831,000, and would be completed by the end of the 
eleventh year, assuming design started early in the ninth year of the program. Included would be the 
extension of the Fort Pond Brook Intercepting Sewer to a point in Central Street, the Indian Village 
Main Sewer, a part of the Grassy Pond Main Sewer, and lateral sewers. We estimate that this pro- 
ject would be eligible for about $192,000 in Federal grants. 

19. Phase IV of the program is estimated to cost about $931,000 and would be completed by the thirteenth 
year, again assuming that design started soon after the beginning of the eleventh year of the program. 
Included would be the Flagg Hill Main Sewer, the Guggins Brook Main Sewer, and lateral sewers. We 
estimate this project would be eligible for about $249,000 in Federal grants. 

20. Phase V, VI, and VII would cost about $1,468,000 and would complete sewering most of the presently 
developed areas in the Fort Pond Brook Sewer District. These projects could be completed by the 
nineteenth year. 

21. Phase VIII would cost about $990,000 and would be the beginning of sewers for the Nashoba Brook 
Sewer District. It would be completed by the end of the twenty-second year. Included would be the 
Nashoba Brook Pump Station and force main, the Nashoba Brook Intercepting Sewer northwesterly to 
Concord Road and lateral sewers in the Bobbins Park area. 

22. Later phases of the sewerage project would be developed in the future as the need arises. 

23. To finance the initial Phase I construction, we recommend a general obligation bond issue to equal 
the estimated cost for Phase I of $3,103,000, less the amount of Federal grants available. The bond 
issue would be amortized from general taxation. We estimate that about $2.03 would be added to the 
tax rate. 

24. We recommend that the construction of those remaining parts of the system that benefit the entire 
town either directly or indirectly, be similarly financed from a combination of Federal grants and 
General Obligation Bonds amortized from general taxation. 

25. To finance the construction of street and lateral sewers, we recommend the establishment of a system 
of betterment assessments wherein a part of the cost would be financed through direct assessment on 
properties abutting the sewers, a part through General Obligation Bonds amortized by general taxation, 
and a part from Federal grants for those sewers eligible. 

26. We recommend that individual building sewers (house connections) be paid for by each property owner. 

27. To finance the cost of maintenance and operation of the sewerage system, we recommend the estab- 
lishment of a system of sewer service charges. Charges for residential properties could be based on 
a flat-rate charge per dwelling unit. Charges for commercial, industrial, and all other non-residen- 
tial properties should be based on metered water consumption. Deficits in the early years of the pro- 
gram would of necessity have to be financed from general taxation. 

28. The determination of the actual amount of both betterment and service charges should be the subject 
of further detailed study. 

29. We estimate sewer betterment charges at about $7.00 per front foot. 

30. We estimate the annual sewer service charge at around $30.00 per dwelling unit. For commercial, 
industrial, and other non -residential properties, we estimate sewer service charges of 80 to 90 
per cent of water billings. 



93 



31. In order for Acton to proceed with the sewerage program, three courses of action are possible: 

a. Apply for another interest-free final planning loan from the Federal Government to pay 
for preparation of final engineering plans and specifications for Phase I. 

b. Appropriate town funds for final engineering and contract for such services. 

c. Authorize a bond issue for both the engineering and construction of Phase I. 

The decision should be made at a town meeting by vote, after presentation of articles for a warrant 
and applicable data, costs, plans, etc., by the Sewerage Study Committee. 

If the Town decides to take no action on this report and stand still for a period of time, perhaps 10 years, 
the estimated costs would total $5,459,000, without Federal aid or assistance and the Town would still not have 
a total solution to their sewerage disposal problem. 

2,600 homes in Acton, 80% or 2,080 homes in Fort Pond Brook Drainage Area 

Replacing each of 2,080 systems in 10 years at $1200 $2, 496, 000 

Pumping these 2,080 systems every 2 years at $25 208, 000 

150 new systems, 80% = 120 x $600 x 10 years 720, 000 

Pumping these systems every 2 years 48, 000 

Town purchase of impossible-to-repair systems - 20 houses at $17,000 340, 000 

Tax loss 96. 000 

$3, 908, 000 

Increased construction costs 5%/year x 10 years 1. 551. 000 



$5, 459, 000 



RECOMMENDATIONS 



1. The SSC recommends that the plan for the acquisition of a public sewerage system for the Town of 
Acton, as described in the Report of the SSC upon Proposed Sewerage System for the Town of Acton as prepared 
by Metcalf and Eddy be quickly and diligently implemented in the Town of Acton. 

2. The SSC further recommends that the appropriately designated Boards and Committees of the Town 
consider the below listed recommendations for incorporation into their planning for the Town. 

a. The Planning Board should initiate 2 acre zoning to the right of Route 2 westbound. Multiple 
family dwellings should be limited until sewerage is available. 

b. The Personnel Board, Health Board, and Board of Selectmen should provide adequate manpower 
to stringently enforce existing regulations on new building and repairs of existing septic systems. 

c. The Board of Selectmen should consider the cost and effect of condemning property to alleviate 
long standing and incorrectable malfunctioning septic systems. 

d. The Board of Health should prepare a detailed information brochure on the operation and main- 
tenance of septic systems to be distributed annually to residents (e. g., "Septic Tank Care" published by 
the U. S. Health, Education, and Welfare and a report on detergents prepared by the New Hampshire 
Fish and Game Department). 

e. The Town should establish a Department of Public Works which would direct all activities of the 
Engineering Department, Sewerage Department (design, construction and operation). Street Department, 
and a Water Department following the integration into the Town organization. 

We acknowledge with sincere appreciation the cooperation and assistance of the Board of Selectmen and 
all other Town boards and committees who have furnished information, advice and cooperation. 

Paul R. Nyquist, Chairman 
James S. Winston, Secretary 
H. Raymond Durling, Jr. 
Robert J. Ellis 
Ed Patrick 



Attach. 



DATA from "Soils and Their Interpretations 
for Various Land Uses" by U. S. Soil Conservation 



Area Percent 



1. Slight Limitation - Soils are suitable for intensive use and sewage 
disposal systems should perform satisfactorily. Single family 
homes on lots of j acre or less. 1, 522 11. 7 



94 



Area 



Percent 



2. Moderate Limitation - Soils are usually suitable for intensive 
use, but may require extra site preparation. Sandy or gravelly 
materials. No water-restricting layers within 4 feet of the 
surface. 

3. Severe Limitation - Suited for occasional use where homes are 
not closely spaced. Increased installation costs where limita- 
tions can be overcome. 

3H Well drained soils on slopes of less than 8%. Hardpan layer 
at 30-60 in. in 50% of soils. 

3S Well drained slopes, 8-15% 

3W Moderately well drained, fluctuating water table up to 2 ft. with- 
in surface 

4. Very Severe Limitation - Seldom suitable for sewage disposal 
systems. 

4H Well and moderately drained hardpan within 30 in. of surface. 

4R Shallow soils underlain by bedrock. 

4S Well drained or droughtly soils, slopes 15-35% 

4W Poorly drained, high ground water up to surface 7 or more 
months per year. 

X Unclassified 



438 



1, 699 
576 

277 



3.4 



13. 1 
4. 5 

2. 1 



3, 202 


24.6 


1,348 


10. 4 


414 


3.2 


2, 774 


21. 3 


744 


5.7 



12. 994 



100. 



Table 10 
FINANCIAL ANALYSIS 



YEAR 



1st 



2nd 



3rd 



6th 



7th 



8th 



•MOUNT OF MONEV REQ'D FOR 
CONSTRUCTION 

LESS FEDERAL GRANT 

BOND ISSUE REQUIRED 

INTEREST ON BONDS 4^ 
TOTAL BONO MATURITIES 
OPERATION ( MAINTENANCE 
TOTAL ANNUAL COST 



ASSESSMENTS LEVIED • )7.00 
PER FRONT FOOT 



$ 210,000 ) 1,794,000 ) 700,000 $ 512,000 ) >t92.0OO $ 482.000 t 462,000 ) 456.000 ) 491.000 $ 400.000 



210,000 



» — 



342,000 


310.000 


190,000 


160,000 


170,000 


170.000 


110,000 


128,000 


100.000 


1,452,000 


390,000 


321,000 


312.000 


312,000 


312.000 


346,000 


363,000 


300,000 


8,400 


66.200 


79,600 


69.400 


107,900 


116,400 


125,900 


135,100 


141,800 


7,000 


55,400 


66,400 


79,100 


69,500 


99,900 


110,300 


121,900 


133,700 


— 


1.0,000 


20,000 


30,000 


40,000 


50,000 


51.000 


52.000 


53.000 



131,600 



237,400 



266,300 



» - 



114,000 



60,000 



66,000 



66.000 



309,000 



328,500 



TOTAL RECEIPTS FROM ASSESS- 
MENTS INCLUDING INTEREST 

TOTAL RECEIPTS FROM SEWR 
RENTAL t )30.00 PER DWELLING 
PLUS ADDITIONAL FOR MERCANTILE 

TOTAL RECEIPTS 



5,700 



7,200 



ANNUAL DEFICIT 
VALUATION OF TOWN 
TAX RATE EFFECT 



12,900 



14,090 



12,500 



26,590 



20,020 



( — ) 15,400 ) 131,600 155,600 171,910 

♦65,000,000 $69,000,000 $72,600,000 $76,500,000 $80,SOO,000 

nmfimm mpmm mwim> m/mAw t,wMiM 

$0.22 $1.81 $2.03 ♦2-1'' 

- m-rp m-f^ hwpi muh 



36,020 



25,210 



20,000 



45,210 



54,510 



201.360 221,090 232,690 

$811,000,000 $87,500,000 $91,500,000 

mimim mimi-m mi^mm 

$2.U0 $2.53 $2,511 

mf4^ mm mm 



29,500 



65,480 



243,520 



35 ,-^00 



76 , 740 



251,760 



$95,000,000 $99,000,000 

mm-flf¥> mm-pfip 

$2.55 $2,511 

m-fip m-pf 



95 



SUGGESTED METHOD FOR SEWER ASSESSMENTS 
(may be paid over 20 years) 



100 €' 

Conn. - 

so e 




S' 



3; 



ZOO' 



7777777T, 



iOOff 00 i 

Cona. - 

70 9 '" 



III 



SO 



Ccnncost y^TTTTTT, 
bij owner / / 

Hot/sf connected i)^ opproi^o/ 
of Sewer Comm. 



\ 

to 

'90 



*tH 



Assess /ongesf stde, 
a/>o/e /OO' on remoioing 
s/de - use one ha^f curve 
/4a'e " - 
Connection = 

„ so-e 00-- 



Mini/nurrj assess/Tjent^ 
Connection ' 



Connection 



S0_ 



TTTTTTTT) 



'/^/,,,// 



y777-m 



UjuA 



T' 






'<3 eo- 



1 



3 ct¥cr a^ ophon 
of otY/Jcr for 
3 f/r per/0€/ 

f25 



for fi//i/re ji 
connecf-ton^ 



I 



PUBLIC STREET 



^ a.oo' 

' l/n<^ey^€/opff</ Sk^ornp^ / Grief • 



,A, 



^1 



1.1 



A 



/Issessmenf dOO'^ o" «'' — 

^aspend assessment unti/ /oncf /s improved 
and deve/oped- then remoye suspension 
and app/i/ assessment. Po not /t^ote) -^ 



r 



Article 8: SEWERAGE STUDY (cont'd.) 
MOTION: To accept the special report of the Sewerage Study Committee. 
VOTED: To amend the motion and substitute a motion that the Town: 

1. Receive the special report of the Sewerage Study Committee as a status report without commitment as 
to the recommendations made. 

2. Instruct the Sewerage Study Committee to coordinate the evaluation by other concerned town boards of 
the implications of the proposed sewerage project. 

3. Instruct other concerned town boards to consider any questions within their jurisdictions pertinent to 
the sewerage study and to make appropriate recommendations. 

4. Instruct all concerned town boards to report to the town not later than the next annual town meeting. 
VOTED: That the town: 

1. Receive the special report of the Sewerage Study Committee as a status report without commitment as 
to the recommendations made. 

2. Instruct the Sewerage Study Committee to coordinate the evaluation by other concerned town boards of 
the implications of the proposed sewerage project. 

3. Instruct other concerned town boards to consider any questions within their jurisdictions pertinent to 
the sewerage study and to make appropriate recommendations. 

4. Instruct all concerned town boards to report to the town not later than the next annual town meeting. 

Article 5: BYLAW 

To see if the Town will adopt the following Bylaw: No person, except an officer of the law in the performance of 
his duties, shall enter upon the premises of another person or upon any public property with intent of peeping in 
a window of any home or other building or of spying in any manner upon any person. 

Any person violating the provisions of this Bylaw may, upon conviction of such violation, be fined not more than 
$20.00 for each offense. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

MOTION: To take affirmative action. 



96 



VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To insert the words "Unless authorized by the owner or tenant," 

VOTED: To adopt the following Bylaw: 

Unless authorized by the owner or tenant, no person, except an officer of the law in the performance of his dut- 
ies, shall enter upon the premises of another person or upon any public property with intent of peeping in a 
window of any home or other building or of spying in any manner upon any person. 

Any person violating the provisions of this bylaw may, upon conviction of such violation, be fined not more than 
$20.00 for each offense. 

Article 6: HEALTH INSURANCE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from Free Cash the sum of $1,500.00 to be expended for health services 
contracted for by the Board of Health in furtherance of the purposes of the Health Insurance for the Aged Act. 

Article 7. INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: That the membership of the Industrial Development Commission established under 
Article 35 of the March 1961 Annual Town Meeting be increased to nine members. 

Article 9: SEWERAGE COMMITTEE 

To see if the Town will vote to create a five -man Sewerage Committee to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen, 
said committee to undertake the supervision of the design and construction of a sewerage system and recommend 
to the Board of Selectmen upon completion of an operational plan for the sewerage system, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 10: SEWERAGE 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the sum of $170,000.00, or any other sum, the same to be used for 
construction plans and specifications, cost estimates, and related contract bid documents for the initial phase of 
the sewerage project of the Town, said documents to be rendered by an engineer selected and employed by the 
Sewerage Committee, or any other Committee, said funds or so much thereof that may be required, to be 
received by and administered by the Town Treasurer under the direction of the Sewerage Committee, or any 
other Committee, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 

Article 11: SEWERAGE 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Sewerage Study Committee, or any other Committee, to make 
application to the United States of America under the terms of Public Law 560, 83rd Congress of the United 
States, as amended, for funds not to exceed $170,000.00, and to expend the same for construction plans and 
specifications, cost estimates, and related contract bid documents for the initial phase of the sewerage project 
of the Town, said documents to be rendered by an engineer selected and employed by the Sewerage Committee, 
or any other Committee, said funds or so much thereof that may be required, and advanced from the United 
States to be received by and administered by the Town Treasurer under the direction of the Sewerage Committee, 
or any other Committee, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 

Article 12: SEWERAGE 

To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of $2,375,000.00, for the purpose of constructing a sewerage system 
and sewerage treatment facilities and authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
said sum under the authority of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause 15, and to issue at one time or 
from time to time notes or bonds of the Town therefor, payable according to the applicable provisions of said 
Chapter 44, each such issue of notes or bonds to be paid in not more than 30 years from its date or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 

Article 13: SEWERAGE 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Sewerage Committee, or any other Committee, to make application 
to the United States of America under the provisions of Public Law 660 of the 84th Congress, as amended, for 
the maximum available grant to assist in meeting the construction cost of said system, including the cost of the 
treatment plant, lift stations and main interceptor sewers, said funds, if and when received, to be administered 
by the Town Treasurer under the direction of the Sewerage Committee, or any other Committee, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 

97 



Article 14: SEWERAGE 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Sewerage Committee, or any other Committee, to make application 
to the United States of America under the Provisions of Public Law 89-117, 89th Congress, as amended, for the 
maximum grant of funds to assist in meeting that portion of the construction cost of public sewer facilities of the 
Town which is not covered by said public Law 660, 84th Congress, said funds, if and when received, to be admin- 
istered by the Town Treasurer under the direction of the Sewerage Committee, or any other Committee, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 15: SEWERAGE LAND 

To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the Great and General Court for passage of 
an act which will permit the Town to purchase, or otherwise acquire, for sewerage disposal purposes all or any 
portion of a parcel of land situated on the southerly side of Route 2 and on the southeasterly side of School Street 
and containing approximately 50 acres, which belongs to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for use by the 
Department of Correction (Concord Reformatory), and which is bounded and described as follows: 

Southeasterly by the Acton-Concord Town line; 
Southwesterly by land of Lexington Sand & Gravel Co., Inc. 

(Plat H4, Parcel 126 on the Town Atlas); 
Southeasterly by said Parcel 126; 
Southwesterly by land of Lexington Sand k Gravel Co., Inc. 

(Plat H4, Parcel 114 on the Town Atlas) and of 

Allen M. & Anne R. Christofferson (Plat H4, Parcel 76 

on the Town Atlas); 
Northwesterly by School Street; and 
Northerly by Route 2. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 10:52 P. M. 

A true copy. Attest: CHARLES M. MacRAE 

Town Clerk 



98 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, DECEMBER 5, 1966 



Article 1: BYLAW 

VOTED: To amend the Building Bylaw of the Town of Acton by inserting the following in Section 11 after the 
second sentence: 

"All drop or flush girts under first floor on one and two story buildings shall be 4" x 6" laid on edge." 

Article 2: BYLAW 

VOTED: To amend the Building Bylaw of the Town of Acton by inserting the following at the end of Section 11: 

"B; Every builder or owner shall provide a safe hand rail and supporting banister or other protective 
device for every stairway having a total rise of 30 inches or more, which is used by the occupants. 

Every builder or owner shall provide wall or protective railing at least 36 inches high for every 
porch, balcony or similar place which is more than 30 inches above ground and is used by the 
occupants." 

Article 3. 

MOTION: To take no action. 

Article 4: FREE CASH 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from Free Cash the amount of $4,526.33 to be used for the 1966 Pension 
Fund allotment. 

Article 5: SCHOOLS 

MOTION: To amend the Agreement for a Regional School District of the Towns of Acton and Boxborough so as 
to provide for the inclusion in said Regional School District of all public schools in said towns and as more par- 
ticularly set forth in the proposal, namely, 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO AGREEMENT 

FOR 

REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

FOR 

TOWNS OF ACTON AND BOXBOROUGH 

Amendment No. 4. 

1. Amend paragraph B of Section 1 by deleting the said paragraph in its entirety and substituting 
the following new paragraph: 

"B. Election to membership on the committee shall take place in the respective 
member towns in the same manner as election to membership on a local 
school committee." 

2. Amend Section 2 in said Agreement by deleting the entire section and substituting the following 
new section: 

"SECTION 2. TYPE OF REGIONAL SCHOOLS 
The regional district schools shall include all public schools through grade 12." 

3. Amend paragraph A of Section 3 by deleting the said paragraph in its entirety and substituting 
the following new paragraph: 

"(A) Residents of the member towns may attend the regional district schools under the 
same regulations as would apply to a comparable local school." 

4. Amend Section 4 of said Agreement by deleting the entire Section and substituting the following 
new Section 4: 

"SECTION 4. . . LOCATION OF THE REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL AND LEASE OF 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



99 



i 



(A) All district schools shall be located within the geographical limits of the district. 
The regional district schools for grades 7 through 12, inclusive, shall be located in 
the town of Acton. There shall be one or more elementary schools located in the 
town of Boxborough and in the town of Acton. 

(B) The town of Acton is hereby authorized to lease to the regional school district 
the following elementary school buildings and the land appurtenant thereto and used 
in conjunction therewith: 

1. McCarthy School 

2. Towne School 

3. Merriam School 

4. The existing Elm Street School 

5. The Elm Street School now in process of construction. 

(C) The town of Boxborough is hereby authorized to lease to the regional school 
district the Blanchard Memorial Elementary School building and the land appurtenant 
thereto and used in conjunction therewith. 

(D) Each of the leases authorized in this section 4 shall be for a term of 20 years and 
the term shall commence on the date when the Committee assumes jurisdiction over the 
elementary school grades (except the lease of the second Elm Street School, the term 
of which shall commence on the date the school is complete and ready for occupancy, 
and shall expire on the same date as the other leases). Neither the town of Acton nor 
the town of Boxborough shall receive any rental under any such lease. Each said lease 
shall also contain: (i) a provision for the extension thereof for an additional term not 

in excess of 20 years at the option of the Committee, (ii) provisions authorizing the 
regional school district to insure, repair, improve, alter, reconstruct or remodel any 
of the leased buildings, and (iii) such other terms as may be determined by the Select- 
men of the respective towns and the Committee, who shall execute the leases for said 
towns and the regional school district, respectively." 

Amend paragraph B of Section 5 by deleting the entire paragraph and substituting the followin| 
new paragraph: 

"(B) Construction costs shall include all expenses in the nature of capital outlay such 
as the cost of acquiring land, the cost of constructing, reconstructing, and adding to 
buildings, and the cost of remodeling or making extraordinary repairs to a school 
building or buildings, including without limitation the cost of the original equipment 
and furnishings for such buildings or additions, plans, architects' and consultants' 
fees, grading and other costs incidental to placing school buildings or additions and 
related premises in operating condition and for the construction of sewerage systems 
and sewage treatment and disposal facilities or for the purchase or use of such sys- 
tem with the member towns. Construction costs shall also include payment of prin- 
cipal of and interest on bonds, notes or other obligations issued by the regional 
school district to finance construction costs." 

Amend paragraph D of Section 5 by deleting the entire paragraph and substituting the following 
new paragraph: 

"(D) Construction costs shall be apportioned annually in December for the ensuing 
calendar year. 

Construction costs for such year which are attributable to the payment of interest 
on and principal of the debt of the regional school district which is outstanding at 
the time this amendment becomes effective shall continue to be apportioned among 
the member towns as follows: 

Acton 95% 

Boxborough. . . . 5% 

Any other construction costs for such year shall be apportioned among the member 
towns as follows: Acton - 95%, Boxborough - 5%, except for any such year in which 
pupils resident in the Town of Boxborough on the preceding October 1 exceed nine 
(9) percent of the pupils in all the district schools resident in both member towns, 
and in each such year the percentage of such other construction costs so apportioned 
to the Town of Boxborough shall be increased and the percentage thereof so appor- 
tioned to the Town of Acton shall be decreased by the percent (computed to the 
nearest 1/lOth of 1 %) by which pupils resident in the Town of Boxborough in all of 
the district schools on the preceding October 1 exceed nine (9) percent of the pupils 
in said schools on that date resident in both member towns. Said other construction 
costs for such year in which there were no pupils enrolled in some or all of the dis- 
trict schools on the preceding October 1 shall be apportioned according to the per- 
centages in effect in the last preceding year in which there was an apportionment 
hereunder. 



100 



The construction costs apportioned in any year to each town shall be the sum of the 
costs apportioned in accordance with the foregoing provisions." 

7. Amend paragraph E of Section 6 by changing the words "regional district school" to 
"regional district schools" wherever the same appear and by deleting the word 
"seven" in the last sentence of said paragraph and substituting the word "kindergarten." 

8. Add a new Section 14 to said Agreement which reads as follows: 

"SECTION 14. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS' CONTRACTS 

Teachers serving in the elementary schools of the towns of Acton and Boxborough 
shall continue to serve in their respective schools after jurisdiction thereof has 
been assumed by the district which shall be responsible for the unexpired portions 
of the outstanding contracts between said teachers and the respective towns. Every 
said teacher serving at the discretion of a local school committee of said towns 
shall be elected by the regional district school committee to serve at its discretion." 

9. This fourth amendment shall become fully effective at midnight June 30, 1967, and the regional 
school district school committee shall thereupon assume jurisdiction of all public schools in the 
towns of Acton and Boxborough, provided, however, that the provisions of Section 11 of the 
Agreement shall be effective upon its acceptance by a majority of the voters present and voting 
in each of the member towns as provided in Section 7 of the Agreement. 

Moderator appointed the following tellers: Clyde J. Home, Alice J. Schafer, Warren W. Wheeler, Dewey E. 
Boatman, John F. McLaughlin, Beverlie B. Tuttle, Mary A. Sawyer, Russell E. Dow, Philip G. Watts. 

Total Vote - 438. Yes - 156. No - 282. 

Article 20: LIBRARY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept a gift under the will of Lydia F. Griffin of Gloucester. Massachusetts in 
memory of Arthur Davis in the amount of $500.00 to be used for the Acton Memorial Library. 

Article 21: LIBRARY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept a gift in the amount of $1,000.00 from the Blanchard Foundation of which the 
Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Co. is trustee to be used toward paying the cost of construction of the new library 
addition. 

Article 22: STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following street, or portions thereof, constructed under the requirements 
of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town 
Clerk: 

Spring Hill Road, in Spring Hill Tract Subdivision, 1930 feet ± from Pope Road in a northwesterly 
direction to the northwesterly sidelines of a 75 -foot radius cul-de-sac 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said plans. 

Article 23: STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following street, or portions thereof, constructed under the requirements 
of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town 
Clerk: 

Heritage Road, in Heritage Farms Subdivision, from School Street 1250 feet ± in a southwesterly 
direction to Station 12+50 including both sides of the double entrance road 

including the takings or acceptance of easennents for drainage or other purposes where shown on said plans. 

Article 24. 

MOTION: To take no action. 

Article 25: STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following street, or portions thereof, constructed under the requirements 
of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town 
Clerk: 

Capt. Brown's Lane, in Minuteman Ridge Subdivision, from the easterly sideline of Joseph Reed 
Lane 1580 feet ± in a southeasterly direction to the previously accepted portion of this street at 

101 



Station 7 + 70 ± just north of the proposed Capt. Forbush Lane 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said plans. 

Article 26: STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following street, or portions thereof, constructed under the requirements 
of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town 
Clerk: 

Patriots Road, in Putnam Park Subdivision, from its southeasterly entrance at Newtown Road 
in a northeasterly direction 842 feet ± to Station 8 + 42.68 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said plans. 

Article 27. 

MOTION: To take no action. 

Article 28: STREETS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following streets, or portions thereof, constructed under the requirement 
of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town 
Clerk: 

Jefferson Drive, in Isaac Davis Park Subdivision, from the previously accepted section 

of Jefferson Drive 165 feet ± in a northeasterly direction to the westerly sideline of Musket 

Drive 

Musket Drive, in Isaac Davis Park Subdivision, from Station 8 + 56.59 at the westerly side- 
line of the proposed Fife and Drum Road 783 feet ± in a westerly direction to Station 16 + 39.88 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said plans. 

Article 2 9: STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following street, or portions thereof, constructed under the requirements 
of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town 
Clerk: 

Old Village Road, in Centre Village Subdivision, from Nagog Hill Road 3063 feet ± in an 
easterly direction to Station 30 + 84. This being the entire road, 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said plans. 

Article 30: STREETS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following streets, or portions thereof, constructed under the requirement 
of the Subdivision Control Law in the Stonehedge Section II Subdivision, and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen 
according to plans on file with the Town Clerk: 

Partridge Pond Road, from Taylor Road 1461 feet ± in a westerly direction to the westerly 
sideline of a 62. 5 -foot radius cul-de-sac 

Huckleberry Lane, from the previously accepted section of Huckleberry Lane, being the 
westerly sideline of a 62. 5 -foot radius cul-de-sac, 347.5 feet ± in a westerly direction to 
Station 8 + 68.48 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said plans. 

Article 31: STREETS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following streets, or portions thereof, constructed under the requirement 
of the Subdivision Control Law in Azalea Park Subdivision, and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to 
plans on file with the Town Clerk: 

Bayberry Road, from Pope Road 1558 feet ± in a southeasterly direction to the easterly 
sideline of a 62.5-foot radius cul-de-sac 

Myrtle Drive, from Bayberry Road 618 feet ± in a northeasterly direction to Station 6+18 

Magnolia Drive, from Bayberry Road 903 feet ± in a northeasterly direction to Station 9 + 3.61 



102 



Rose Court, from Magnolia Drive 3 92 feet ± in a northwesterly direction to the westerly- 
sideline of a 62. 5 -foot radius cul-de-sac 

Phlox Lane, from Myrtle Drive 919 feet ± in a southeasterly direction to Magnolia Drive 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said plans. 

Article 32: STREETS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following streets, or portions thereof, constructed under the requirements 
of the Subdivision Control Law in Evergreen Heights Subdivision, and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen accord- 
ing to plans on file with the Town Clerk: 

Evergreen Road, 1828 feet ± from Newtown Road in a northerly direction to Hammond Street 

Larch Road, from Evergreen Road 387 feet ± in an easterly direction to Station 4 + 10 ± 

Balsam Drive, from Larch Road 487 feet ± in a northerly direction to Station + 00 

Hickory Hill Trail, from Balsam Drive 95 feet ± in an easterly direction to Station 1 + 16 ± 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said plans. 

Article 6. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell or otherwise dispose of the house at 
11 Woodbury Lane, Acton. 

Article 7: BYLAWS 

VOTED: To amend Section 1 of the Bylaws of the Town of Acton by adding the following new Article: 

Article 8. No person shall make any indecent figure or write any indecent or obscene 
words upon any fence, building or structure in any public place, or upon any street, sidewalk 
or wall. 

Total Vote - 394. Yes - 210. No - 184. 

Article 8: BYLAWS 

MOTION: To amend Section 1 of the Bylaws of the Town of Acton by adding the following new Article: 

Article 9. No person, unless authorized, shall go from place to place within the Town 
taking orders for any goods, wares, or merchandise, nor shall any person go begging or 
soliciting alms on foot or from a vehicle, without having first recorded his name and address 
with the Chief of Police, and furnished such information as may be requested of him. The 
Chief of Police shall, thereupon, if satisfied with the honesty of the applicant, issue a permit 
for a period not exceeding one (1) month which must be shown on request, and shall state that 
said person has duly registered and is entitled to go from place to place within the Town for 
the purpose specified. 

No person unless otherwise properly licensed by the State or Selectmen, shall go from 
place to place in the Town selling or bartering or carrying for sale or barter, or exposing 
therefor, any goods, wares or merchandise. 

The Chief of Police may, however, authorize the Director of any worthy cause to 
solicit contributions within the Town without having each Solicitor under his direction 
registered. Religious organizations or charitable groups within the Town shall be exempt 
from this section. 

The penalty for violation of this bylaw shall be not more than $20.00 for each offense. 

VOTED: To strike out "place to place" wherever it appears and insert "house to house". 

MOTION: As amended was lost by unanimous vote. 

Article 9: EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

MOTION: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint an Executive Secretary in accordance with Section 23A 
of Chapter 41 of the General Laws, and to appropriate from available funds the sum of $4,000.00 for the said 
purpose. 

MOTION lost. 



103 



10:50 P. M. Voted to adjourn until 7:30 P. M. Monday, December 12, 1966 at Blanchard Auditorium. 

Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:30 P. M. on Monday, December 12, 1966. 

Article 10: BYLAWS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Bylaws of the Town of Acton by striking out the second paragraph under 
Unregistered Motor Vehicles and inserting a new paragraph as follows; 

Owners or persons having control of the land on which such storing, parking or placing 
of unregistered motor vehicles occurs shall, within five (5) days following receipt of a notice 
from the Selectmen, remove or enclose such vehicle. 

Article 11. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Selectmen on behalf of the Town to apply to the Metropolitan Area 
Planning Council to be included in the Metropolitan Area Planning District as provided in General Laws, Chapter 
6, Section 111, as amended by Chapter 588 of the Acts of 1966. 

Article 12: REGIONAL REFUSE DISPOSAL PLANNING COMMITTEE 

VOTED: To create a special unpaid committee to be known as the Acton Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Com- 
mittee, consisting of three persons to be appointed by the moderator, which committee shall do the following: 

1. Join in its discretion with a similar committee fronn any contiguous town or towns to form one 
or more regional refuse disposal planning boards to study the advisability of establishing a 
regional refuse disposal district, its organization, operation and control and to study also the 
advisability of selecting, constructing, maintaining and operating a refuse disposal facility; 

2. If the Town committee favors the establishment of a regional refuse disposal district, join 
in drawing up a proposed regional agreement; and 

3. In any event, report its findings to the Board of Selectmen; 

all as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Sections 44A-44K, as amended, and that the Town appropriate 
from Free Cash the sum of $200.00, for the purposes of meeting the expenses of any regional refuse disposal 
planning board. 

Article 13: BYLAW 

VOTED: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Acton and the Zoning Map of the Town of Acton 
as follows: 

By changing from residential R-1, (40,000 sq. ft.) to Residential R-3, (80,000 sq. ft.) with a 
minimum frontage of 200 feet the following described area of land in that part of Acton called 
East Acton, bounded and described as follows; 

Beginning at a point on the southeasterly sideline of Carlisle Road at the Acton-Carlisle 
Town Line, thence running; 

SOUTHERLY AND SOUTHEASTERLY by the Acton-Carlisle Town Line to the Concord- 
Acton Town Line, thence: 

SOUTHWESTERLY by said Concord-Acton Town Line to the existing General Business 
(B-1) Zone line northeasterly of Great Road, thence: 

NORTHWESTERLY AND NORTHERLY by said existing General Business (B-1) Zone 
to a point on the southerly sideline of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad right- 
of-way, thence: 

NORTHEASTERLY by said railroad right-of-way to the center line of Nashoba Brook, thence: 

NORTHEASTERLY AND NORTHERLY by the center line of Nashoba Brook to the south- 
easterly sideline of Carlisle Road, thence: 

NORTHEASTERLY by said sideline of Carlisle Road to the point of beginning 

and by adding to Section III A-1: 

c. Residence 3 (min. 80,000 sq. ft.) R -3 
and by adding to Section IV -B, the designation, R-3, after the words, "Residential and Agricul- 
tural Districts (R-1 and R-2)" 
and by adding to Section IV -B, 1, the designation, R-3, after the words, "In a Residential and 



104 



Minimum 


Yard 


Maximum 


Dimensions 


Height of 


Front 


Side 


Buildings 


Yard 


Yard 


Stories 


45' 


20' 




45' 


20' 



Agricultural District (R-1 and/or R-2)" 

and by adding the following to Section V-B, Intensity Regulation Schedule District and Uses 

Lot Area Frontage* 

(Sq. Ft.) 

R-3 All Residential 
and Agricultural 

Uses 80, 000 200' 

All Other Uses 80, 000 200' 

and by adding R-3 to Section V-B, Intensity Regulation Schedule District and Uses, under Minimum Lot 
Dimensions and * Exceptions thereto after the words: 

"2) If a lot fronts entirely on the outside of a curved road sideline of 300-foot radius or less, 
the minimum frontage will be 125 feet for R-2 and 150 feet for R-1." 

Total vote - 258. Yes - 241. No - 17. Needed to carry - 172. 

Article 14: BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Acton by adding to Section V-B, 
Intensity Regulation Schedule District and Uses, the following paragraphs: 

1. Continuous Frontage 

Frontage shall be measured in a continuous line along one street. 

2. Frontage Exception for Larger Lots 

Any lot in a R-1 District (40,000 sq. ft.) or R-2 District (20,000 sq. ft.) need not have the 
specified amount of street frontage provided that: 

a. The area of said lot is at least twice the minimum area required for district in which 
it is located; and 

b. The width of said lot, as measured by a line parallel to the street line or parallel to 
the tangent of the curve, through the dwelling site, equals or exceeds in annount the 
specified street frontage of the district in which the lot is located; and 

c. Said lot shall have a minimum street frontage of not less than 80, feet. 

Article 5. 

MOTION to reconsider Article 5. 

Total vote 263. Yes - 102. No - 161. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 15: BYLAW 

MOTION: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Acton, by adding to Article IV (B) the following 
section: 

3. The following non-profit recreational uses may be permitted by the Board of Appeals. 

a) Indoor or outdoor swimming facilities. 

b) Indoor or outdoor tennis facilities. 

c) Golf courses, but excluding the use of artificial lights, and excluding golf driving ranges, 
pitch and putt facilities and miniature golf. 

d) Playgrounds and ball fields. 

e) Outdoor ice skating facilities. 

In issuing any permit within this section, the Board of Appeals shall impose such safeguards, conditions 
and limitations pertaining to the use in question as may, in the reasonable opinion of the members of 
said Board, be necessary or advisable to prevent such permitted use from being either detrimental or 
injurious to the neighborhood or to the value of any property within the neighborhood, or to prevent such 
permitted use from substantially detracting from the residential appearance of the neighborhood. 

Any such permitted use may be limited to a specified period of time and may, at the expiration of said 
period, be extended for a further specified period, after notice and a public hearing. 

VOTED: To amend original motion by adding "Indoor or" to e. 

MOTION: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Acton, by adding to Article IV (B) the 
following section: 



105 



3. The following non-profit recreational uses may be permitted by the Board of Appeals. 

a) Indoor or outdoor swimming facilities. 

b) Indoor or outdoor tennis facilities. 

c) Golf courses, but excluding the use of artificial lights, and excluding golf driving 
ranges, pitch and putt facilities and miniature golf. 

d) Playgrounds and ball fields. 

e) Indoor or outdoor ice skating facilities. 

In issuing any permit within this section, the Board of Appeals shall impose such safeguards, condi- 
tions and limitations pertaining to the use in question as may, in the reasonable opinion of the members 
of said Board, be necessary or advisable to prevent such permitted use from being either detrimental or 
injurious to the neighborhood or to the value of any property within the neighborhood, or to prevent such 
permitted use from substantially detracting from the residential appearance of the neighborhood. 

Any such permitted use may be limited to a specified period of time and may, at the expiration of 
said period, be extended for a further specified period, after notice and a public hearing. 

Total Vote - 274. Yes - 174. No - 100. 2/3 needed - 182. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 16: BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Acton by deleting Section II-D 
relating to Signs and Advertising Devices and substituting thereto the following words: 

D. Signs and Advertising Devices 

1. Definitions 

a. SIGN: This word shall include any letter, word, symbol, drawing, picture, design, 
device, article or object that advertises, calls attention to or indicates any premises, 
person or activity, whatever the nature of the material and manner of composition 

or construction, when the same is placed out-of-doors. 

b. ERECTED: This word shall include the words attached, built, constructed, painted, 
affixed, reconstructed, altered, enlarged and moved. 

2. Rules of general application to all areas. 

Signs any part of which moves or flashes, all signs of the travelling light or animated 
type, and all beacons, noise-making and flashing devices are prohibited. All illumina- 
tion of signs must be so arranged as to prevent glare on to any portion of any public way 
or into any residential area. 

3. No signs or advertising devices of any sort or description may be erected in any location, 
except that: 

a. In Residential and Agricultural Districts the following are permitted. 

i. Signs pertaining to the lease, sale or use of a lot, or buildings provided that 
such signs are not larger than a total area of six (6) square feet. 

ii. Not more than one sign of two square feet, pertaining to the use to which a 
dwelling is put, having the name of the occupant, or the designation of any 
authorized occupation permitted in the district, or both. 

b. In a Business or Industrial District a business shall not have more than one sign 
affixed to each exterior wall of its place of business nor shall it have more than three 
signs in all to advertise the type of business, identify the premises, the occupation 
or trade carried on, or the principal product or service sold. For the purpose of 
this section, two similar signs, back to back, so as to face in opposite directions, 
shall be considered as one sign. 

i. Signs pertaining to the lease, sale or use of a lot or buildings provided that 

such signs are not larger than a total area of six (6) square feet are permitted. 

4. In Business and Industrial districts no signs shall be erected until approved by the Board, 
of Selectmen and licensed by it. Application for a license shall be accompanied by a 
detailed drawing, done to scale, showing the proposed sign together with the proposed 
scheme of colors. The license fee shall be $2.00. Prior to issuing a license for a sign, 
the Board of Selectmen shall give due consideration not only to the location, general 
appearance, hours of illumination, construction, maintenance and public safety, but 
also to determine conformity with the general architectural style prevalent in the area 

in which it is to be located. 

5. Each sign may be licensed for a specific period of time if the Board of Selectmen deems 
that this is in the best interests of the Town. 

6. Temporary signs may be erected as follows: 



106 



a. To warn against contagious disease; 

b. To warn against danger; 

c. To insure silence where serious illness exists; 

d. To allow signs larger than a total area of six (6) square feet pertaining to the 
lease, or sale, or use of a lot or buildings thereon. 

Such temporary signs shall be removed as the need ceases. No license fee shall be 
required for these temporary signs, but a permit must be secured from the Board of 
Selectmen. 

7. Nonconforming Signs: 

a. Any nonconforming sign legally erected prior to the adoption of this section, or 
any amendment thereof, may be continued to be maintained. Such a sign shall 
not be enlarged, reworded, re -designed or altered in any way unless it is brought 
into conformity. 

b. The exemption herein granted shall terminate with respect to any sign which 
(1) shall have been abandoned; (2) advertises or calls attention to any products, 
businesses or activities which are no longer carried on or sold, whether 
generally or at the particular premises, or (3) shall not have been repaired or 
properly maintained within sixty days after notice to that effect has been given 
by the Building Inspector. 

8. Exceptions: 

This section, or any amendment thereof, shall not apply to any church, or any 
building or land used for religious purposes, or educational purposes which are 
religious, sectarian, denominational, or public. 

Article 15. 

MOTION: To reconsider Article 15. 

Total vote - 271. Yes - 178. No - 93. 2/3 needed - 180. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 17: BYLAW 

MOTION: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Acton and the Zoning Map of the Town of Acton 
by changing from Residential {R-2) to Business (B-l) the following described area of land in that part of Acton, 
called West Acton, located on the Southerly side of Arlington Street, bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the Southerly side of Arlington Street at the centerline of Fort Pond 
Brook, thence running: 

SOUTHWESTERLY along Arlington Street to the existing Business (B-l) zone line thence 
turning and running 

SOUTHERLY along said Business (B-l) zone line to a point which is two hundred and fifty 
(250) feet northerly of Massachusetts Avenue at land of Arol J. Charbonneau, thence turning 
and running 

SOUTHEASTERLY along a line parallel to Massachusetts Avenue to Fort Pond Brook, 
thence turning and running 

NORTHERLY along the center line of Fort Pond Brook to the point of beginning. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 18: ELM STREET LAND 

VOTED: To transfer the care, custody, management and control from the School Committee to the Board of 
Selectmen approximately 5.2 acres of land on Elm Street for recreational purposes. The bounds of said land 
area 55 feet S50-38E on Elm Street beginning at Louis A. Flerra land, 200 feet S42-26W, 697 feet S7-26E, 
725 feet along centerline of Fort Pond Brook to Louis A. Flerra land and 715 feet N42-26E. 

Total Vote - 211. Yes - 183. No - 28. Needed 2/3 - 140. 

Article 19:. CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

VOTED: To appropriate from available funds, the sum of $5,000.00 to be used by the Town Building Committee 
in conjunction with funds appropriated under Article 23 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting of 1966 for 
constructing, equipping and furnishing a combination garage and office building for the Cemetery Department on 
land owned by the Town on Concord Road. 

107 



Article 27. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To reconsider Article 27. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following street, or portions thereof, constructed under the require- 
ments of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with 
the Town Clerk: 

Hatch Road, in Pineoaks Subdivision, from High Street 439 feet ± in a southwesterly 
direction to the southerly sideline of a 62.5-foot radius cul-de-sac 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said plans. 

Article 33. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To adopt the following resolution: 

"RESOLVED: that the proposed use of land abutting Route 2 and Wetherbee Street in the Town 
of Acton by the Youth Service Board of the Commonwealth for a Detention and Reception Center is 
contrary to the best interests of Acton, the region and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts inas- 
much as such a use would damage the stature of all of the towns in the area by giving them an 
excessive penal aspect, place the safety of their residents in further jeopardy, diminish land 
values in these towns and their tax base, and seriously impair the future residential growth of 
these towns; and that all appropriate town officials are instructed to take such action as is within 
their power to prevent such a use of this land." 

Meeting adjourned at 11: 10 P. M. 



A true copy. Attest: 



Charles M. MacRae 
Town Clerk 



108 



REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The reports which are submitted herewith represent a statement of the cash 
disbursements authorized during the year ended December 31, 1965, and a Balance 
Sheet of the Town of Acton as at December 31, 1966. 

The 1967 amortization of bonded indebtedness of the Town, and Acton's share 
of the Regional School District bond amortization are: 

Schools: 

Julia McCarthy Elementary School $ 15,000.00 

Julia McCarthy School Addition 10,000.00 

Florence Merriam Elementary School 40,000.00 

Elm Street Elementary School 40,000.00 

Regional School District 51, 261 .05 

Total Schools 156,261.05 

Police Station 20,000.00 

Acton Memorial Library Addition 25, 000.00 

Amortization of bonded indebtedness $201, 261 .05 

The accounts of the Treasurer, Collector and Manager of the School Cafeteria 
have been verified, and I have reviewed the various trust funds in the custody of 
the Treasurer and Trustees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT J. ERICKSON 
Town Accountant 

STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS AND CASH DISBURSEMENTS 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1966 



General Government: 
Moderator: 
Salary 
Expenses 

Finance Committee: 
Expenses 

Selectmen: 

Salaries 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 
Legal services 
Legal service expenses 
Appraisals 

Town Office Clerical Staff: 
Salaries 

Engineering Department: 
Salaries and wages 
Expenses 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 


Cash 
Disbursed 


Balance 


$ 160.00 
25.00 


$ 120.00 
3.00 


$ 


40.00 
22.00 


200.00 


31.00 




169.00 


2,050.00 


2,050.00 




- 


3,600.00 
600.00 

6,000.00 
500.00 

1,000.00 


3,600.00 
580.50 

6,000.00 
206.81 
312.00 




19.50 

293.19 

688.00 


34,932.00 


32,896.64 


2, 


,035.36 


14,7 94.00 
2,850.00 


8,378.74 
1,484.59 


6, 
1, 


,415.26 
,365.41 



109 



General Government - continued: 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 



Cash 
Disbursed 



Balance 



Accountant: 
Salary 
Expenses 

Treasurer - Collector: 
Salary 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 
Capital outlay 

Assessors: 

Salaries 
Expenses 
Capital outlay 

Clerk: 

Salary 
Expenses 

Elections and Registration: 
Salaries and wages 
Expenses 

Planning Board: 

Expenses 

Guarantee deposits - 

Available from 1965 
Cash received 1965 

Personnel Board: 
Expenses 

Board of Appeals: 

Expenses 

Guarantee deposits - 

Available from 1965 
Cash received 1966 

Industrial Development Commission: 
Expenses 



$ 2,441.00 


$ 2 


414.25 


$ 


26.75 


270.00 




255.39 




14.61 


7,268.00 


7 


268.00 




- 


3,200.00 


3 


200.00 




_ 


411.90 




409.99 




1.91 


175.00 




- 




175.00 


4,000.00 


4 


000.00 




_ 


3,650.00 


3 


372.71 




277.29 


450.00 




— 




450.00 


2,306.00 


2 


306.00 




_ 


500.00 




147.48 




352.52 


4,828.00 


3 


,364.76 


1 


,463.24 


3,000.00 


1 


958.55 


1 


,041.45 


1,500.00 




342.15 


1 


,157.85 


188.50 




86.25 




102.25 


250.00 




- 




250.00 


1,300.00 




546.30 




753.70 



25.00 



23.05 



1.95 



42.50 


42.50 


- 


180.00 


116.50 


63.50 


250.00 


_ 


250.00 



Conservation Commission: 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Transfer from Conservation Fund 



200.00 
147.40 



92.55 
147.40 



107.45 



Archives Committee: 
Expenses 

Public Ceremonies and 

Celebrations Committee: 
Expenses 

Buildings and Grounds: 
Salaries and wages 
Expenses 
Capital outlay 

Town Report Committee: 
Expenses 



25.00 



1,000.00 



8,861.00 
7,060.00 
2,300.00 



2,470.00 



18.50 



1,000.00 



7,560.79 
7,002.06 
2,279.03 



2,443.03 



6.50 



1,300.21 
57.94 
20.97 



26.97 



110 



Appr opr i ated 
or 
Available 



Cash 
Disbursed 



Balance 



General Government - continued: 

Total General Government: 
Appropriated 
Available from 1965 
Cash collected 1966 
Reserve fund transfer 
Transfer from Conservation Fund 



Protection of Persons and Property: 
Police Department: 

Salaries and wages 
Expenses 

Fire Department: 

Salaries and wages 

Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

Capital outlay 

Sealer of Weights and Measures: 
Salary and travel 
Expenses 

Moth Department: 
Wages 
Expenses 

Town Forest Committee: 
Maintenance 

Tree Department: 
Wages 
Expenses 

Wire Inspector: 

Wages and travel - 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 

Expenses 

Inspector of Gas Piping and Appliances: 
Wages - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

Building Inspector and Agent for 
Enforcement of Zoning By-Laws: 
Salary and wages 
Expenses 

Dog Officer: 

Wages and travel 
Expenses 

Building Committee: 
Expenses 

Civil Defense: 
Expenses 

Total Protection of Persons and Property: 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 



$123,190.00 


$104,677.38 


$18, 


,512.62 


231,00 


128.75 




102.25 


430.00 


116.50 




313.50 


1,011.90 


990.49 




21.41 


147.40 


147.40 
106,060.52 




- 


125.010.30 


18, 


,949.78 


88,500.00 


87,328.51 


1, 


,171.49 


13,500.00 


12,179.92 


1, 


,320.08 


89,483.00 


78,520.64 


10, 


,962.36 


36,375.00 


36,356.40 




18.60 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 




- 


1,410.00 


1,394.95 




15.05 


390.00 


390.00 




_ 


65.00 


37.95 




27.05 


3,915.00 


3,913.30 




1.70 


2,000.00 


1,971.40 




28.60 



100.00 



7,295.00 
1,150.00 



558.00 
50.00 



50.00 



400.00 



254,476.00 
5,100.00 

259,576.00 



84.64 



7,222.28 

935.81 



558.00 
50.00 



28.93 



292.46 



240,300.71 
4,738.90 

245,039.61 



15.36 



3,610.00 


3,598.63 


11.37 


1,900.00 


1,802.39 


97.61 



2,200.00 


2,200.00 


- 


800.00 


738.90 


61.10 


25.00 


- 


25.00 



1,500.00 


11,434.50 


65.50 


300.00 


- 


300.00 



72.72 
214.19 



21.07 



107.54 



14,175.29 
361.10 

14,536.39 



111 



Highways: 

General Highway Maintenance - 
Salaries 
Expenses 

Street lighting 

Capital outlay 

Total Highways : 

Appropriated 

Health and Sanitation: 

Health and sanitation: 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Garbage collection 

Inspector of Animals: 
Wages 
Expenses 

Plumbing Inspector: 
Wages - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

Total Health and Sanitation: 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 



Appropriated 






or 


Cash 




Available 


Disbursed 


Balance 


$ 60,265.00 


$ 50,048.42 


$10,216.58 


93,065.00 


92,992.51 


72.49 


16, 500.00 


15,824.39 


675.61 


4.165.00 


3,036.91 


1,128.09 


17 3,995.00 


161,902.23 


12,092.77 


13,717.00 


13,110.01 


606.99 


12,135.00 


11,428.11 


706.89 


21,750.00 


21,750.00 


- 


160.00 


160.00 


_ 


30.00 


30.00 


- 



2,500.00 
500,00 



50,292.00 
500.00 

50,792.00 



2,500.00 
398.00 



48,978.12 
398.00 

49,376.12 



102.00 



1,313.88 
102.00 

1,415.88 



Charities : 

Administration: 

Salary - Welfare Board - 
Appropriated 
Federal funds - 

Available from 1965 
Grants 1966 

Public Assistance: 
Appropriated 
Returned payments 

Welfare Board - Federal funds: 
Disability Assistance - 
Cash received 1966 



200.00 




200.00 


120.79 




120.79 


111.16 




29.21 


50,000.00 


50 


,000.00 


716.55 




716.55 



81.95 



1,194.44 



1,138.12 



56.32 



Old Age Assistance - 

Available from 1965 
Cash received 1966 
Lien recoveries 

Aid to Dependent Children 
Available from 1965 
Cash received 1966 



22,242.04 

15,576.65 

6,350.95 



1,819.59 
11,463.24 



22,242.04 
9,075.70 
6,350.95 



1,819.59 
11,163.24 



6,500.95 



300.00 



Medical Assistance - 

Available from 1965 
Cash received 1966 

Total Charities: 

Appropriated 

Returned payments 

Federal funds - 

Available-1965 
Received -1966 

Lien recoveries 



1,234.96 
^8,665.86 



50,200.00 
716.55 

25,417.38 

57,011.35 

6,350.95 

139.696.23 



1,234.96 
28,465.86 



50,200.00 
716.55 

25,417.38 

49,872.13 

6,350.95 

132,557.01 



200.00 



7,139.22 



7,139.22 



112 



Veterans' Aid: 

Veterans' service: 
Salary 
Expenses 
Aid - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

Total Veterans' Aid: 

Education: 

Appropriated: 

Instruction - 

Local 

Regional 
Plant operation and maintenance • 

Local 

Regional 
Transportation - 

Local 

Regional 
Non-instruction service - 

Local 

Regional 
Administration - 

Local 

Regional 
Blanchard Auditorium - 

Local - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

Regional 
Capital outlay - 

Local 

Regional 
Contingency fund - 

Local 

Regional 
Athletic fund - Regional 

School maintenance: 

Federal Public Law 815 - 
Available from 1965 
National Defense Public Law 864, 
Title V - 

Received 1966 
Federal Public Law 874 - 
Available from 1965 
Received 1966 
Transferred to 

Elm Street Cafeteria 

Cafeteria: 

Available from 1965 

Cash received 1966 

Transfer from Public Law 874 

Total Education: 

Appropriated - 

Local 

Regional 
Reserve fund transfer - local 
Federal funds - 

Available from 1965 

Received 1966 

Transfer 
Cafeteria 



Appropriated 

or 

Available 



1,915.00 $ 
275.00 

8,500.00 
2,000.00 



12,690.00 



530,276.00 
524,187.00 

59,452.00 
70,030.00 

66,050.00 
19,942.00 

8,200.00 
17,112.00 

14,450.00 
15,061.00 



10,500.00 

286.00 

5,757.00 

3,673.00 
3,205.00 

1,000.00 

902.00 

7,303.00 



819.68 



4,128.56 

32,447.05 
22,321.00 



11,170.96 

83,458.87 

(A) 3,000.00 



693,601.00 

663,499.00 

286.00 

33,266.73 
26,449.56 

.97,629.83 



Cash 
Disbursed 



1,915.00 
275.00 

8,500.00 
1,525.76 

12,215.76 



507,049.64 
524,187.00 

59,405.10 
70,030.00 

66,050.00 
19,942.00 

7,124.78 
17,112.00 

14,396.14 
15,061.00 



10,071.04 

286.00 

5,757.00 

2,792.89 
3,205.00 

902.91 

902.00 

7,303.00 



Balance 



557.37 

32,447.05 
10,224.30 



11,170.96 

78,084.53 

3,000.00 



667,792.50 

663,499.00 

286.00 

32,447.05 
10,781.67 

92,255.49 



1,514,732.12 1,467,061.71 



474.24 
474.24 

23,226.36 
46.90 

1,075.22 
53.86 

428.96 

880.11 
97.09 

819.68 

3,571.19 

12,096.70 
(A) (3,000.00) 

5,374.34 
25,808.50 



819.68 
15,667.89 
(3,000.00) 
5,374.34 

(3,000.00) 
47,670.41 



113 



Libraries: 

Memorial Library - 

Salaries and wages 

Expenses 

Books 

West Acton - Citizens' Library 
Salaries and wages 
Expenses 

Total Libraries: 

Recreation: 
Wages 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 
Capital outlay 

Total Recreation 

Cemeteries : 

Salaries and wages 
Expenses 
Capital outlay 

Funds : 

Perpetual Care - 

Available from 1965 

Transferred 1966 
Hosmer - 

Available from 1965 

Transferred 1966 
Blanchard - 

Available from 1965 
Wetherbee - 

Available from 1965 

Transferred 1966 
Robbins - 

Available from 1965 
Appleyard - 

Available from 1965 

Transferred 1966 
Whitney - 

Available from 1965 
Hoit & Scott - 

Available from 1965 
Raymond - 

Available from 1965 
Knowlton - 

Available from 1965 
Davis - 

Available from 1965 
Watson - 

Available from 1965 
Wells - 

Available from 1965 
Ames - 

Available from 1965 
O'Neil - 

Available from 1965 
Con ant - 

Available from 1965 

Total ■ Cemeteries : 

Appropriated 

Funds - 

Available from 1965 
Transferred 1966 



Appropriated 






or 


Cash 




Available 


Disbursed 


Balance 


$15,836.00 


$15,173.82 


$ 662.18 


5,410.00 


3,682.08 


1,727.92 


10,000.00 


9,893.25 


106.75 


1,078.00 


965.14 


112.86 


675.00 


673.79 


1.21 


32,999.00 


30,388.08 


2,610.92 


4,153.00 


4,144.62 


8.38 


1,350.00 


1,350.00 


_ 


130.00 


122.93 


7.07 


1,110.00 


1,109.53 


.47 


6,743.00 


6,727.08 


15.92 


21,013.00 


20,093.18 


919.82 


4,270.00 


4,000.18 


269.82 


830.00 


803.72 


26.28 



1, 


,051.25 


1,051.25 


- 


3, 


,950.00 


3,708.06 


241.94 




969.30 


969.30 


_ 


8, 


,106.25 


3,015.64 


5,090.61 




30.20 


21.04 


9.16 




16,12 


16.12 


_ 




100.00 


84.68 


15.32 




11.00 


4.50 


6.50 




3.50 


3.50 


_ 




50.00 


39.30 


10.70 




61.06 


27.50 


33.56 




54.46 


11.95 


42.51 




69.18 


14.05 


55.13 




75.13 


25.85 


49.28 




26.00 


18.30 


7.70 




66.66 


31.75 


34.91 




46.70 


16.70 


30.00 




19.86 


8.50 


11.36 




54.30 


8.55 


45.75 




23.95 


20.50 


3.45 


26, 


,113.00 


24,897.08 


1,215.92 


2, 


,578.67 


2,249.36 


329.31 


12, 


,206.25 


6,847.68 


5.358.57 


49, 


,897.92 


33,994.12 


6,903.80 



114 



Insurance: 

Workmen's compensation 

Surety bond 

Fire insurance on Town buildings 

Boiler and machinery 

Motor vehicle liability 

Group health: 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

Fire fighters ' insurance 

Teachers' liability-Corporal punishment: 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 

Total Insurance: 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 



Pensions: 

Expenses: 

Appropriated 
Special Town Meeting, 
12-5-66, Article #4 

Maturing Debt and Interest: 
Regional School: 

Maturing debt 
Interest 

Julia McCarthy Elementary School: 
Maturing debt 
Interest 

Julia McCarthy Addition: 
Maturing debt 
Interest 

Florence E. Merriam School: 
Maturing debt 
Interest 

South Acton Fire House: 
Maturing debt 
Interest 

Chapter 81 and 90 Highways: 
Maturing debt 
Interest 

Elementary School Land: 
Maturing debt 

Police Station: 

Maturing debt 
Interest 

Anticipation of revenue notes: 
Interest - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 



Appropr i ated 

or 

Available 

$ 5,500.00 

635.00 

8,775.00 
800.00 

3,750.00 



9,500.00 
800.00 

390.00 



1,150.00 
202.00 



30,500.00 
1,002.00 

31,502.00 



18,000.00 
4,526.33 



16,092.05 
82,996.75 



15,000.00 
1,900.00 



10,000.00 
520.00 



40,000.00 
17,280.00 



12,000.00 
300.00 



23,350.00 
642.13 



37,000.00 



20,000.00 
2,240.00 



3,500.00 
385.00 



Cash 
Disbursed 

$ 4,834,07 

586.00 

7,774.26 
775.57 

3,591.98 



9,500.00 
800.00 

387.75 



1,051.53 
202.00 



28,501.16 
1,002.00 

29,503.16 



18,000.00 
4.526.33 



16,092.05 
82,996.75 



15,000.00 
1,900.00 



10,000.00 
520.00 



40,000.00 
17,280.00 



12,000.00 
300.00 



23,350.00 
627.85 



37,000.00 



20,000.00 
2,240.00 



3,500.00 
385.00 



Balance 

$ 665.93 

49.00 

1,000.74 

24.43 

158.02 



2.25 



98.47 



1,998.84 



1,998.84 



14.28 



115 



Maturing Debt and Interest - continued: 

New Elementary School: 
Interest 

Library Addition: 
Principal 
Interest 

Total Maturing Debt and Interest: 
Maturing debt 
Interest - 

Appropr i ated 

Reserve fund transfer 



Special Articles: 



Appropriated 

or 

Available 



$ 25,375.00 



25,000.00 
6,000.00 



198,442.05 

140,753.88 
385.00 

339,580.93 



Cash 
Disbursed 



$ 25,375.00 



3,600.00 



173,442.05 

138,339.60 
385.00 

312,166.65 



Balance 



$25,000.00 
2,400.00 



25,000.00 
2,414.28 

27,414.28 



Town 




Meeting Artie 


Date 


No. 


1-20-64 


3 


3- 9-64 


24 


3- 9-64 


26 


3- 9-64 


32 


3-14-66 


26 


3- 8-65 


9 


3- 8-65 


22 


3- 8-65 


27 


3-14-66 


27 


3- 8-65 


28 


3- 8-65 


34 


6- 7-65 


4 


11-15-65 


2 


3-14-66 


15 


3-14-66 


16 


3-14-66 


18 


3-14-66 


21 


3-14-66 


29 


3-14-66 


30 


3-14-66 


31 


3-14-66 


33 


3-14-66 


34 


3-14-66 


35 


3-14-66 


38 


6- 6-66 


1 


6- 6-66 


2 


12- 6-66 


20 



le 



Purpose 
Assessors' Map 

Sprinkler System-Towne School 
Desks and chairs-Towne School 
Sewerage Study Committee 
Sewerage Study Committee 
Revaluation 
Town Hall Sprinkler 
M.B.T.A. 
M.B.T.A. 
Downey Property 
Cemetery Building Committee 
Mt. Hope Cemetery Fence 
Dump body 
Chapter 81 - 90 
Surplus Government Property 
Snow Fighting equipment 
Haartz Property 
Replace flag pole - Monument 
Fogging Generator 
Walden Clinic 
Water Safety Program 
Fence - Gardiner Playground 
Vocational tuition and 

transportation 
Stabilization Fund 
Transfer to Conservation Fund 
Conservation land 
Griffin bequest to Library 



Total Special Articles: 
Available from 1965 
Appropriated 1966 



Building Construction: 

Acton Memorial Library: 
Available from 1965 

Acton Memorial Library Fund transfer 
Bond issue 

Elm Street School #1: 

Available from 1965 

Elm Street School #2: 

Article 24, 3-14-66 



3,356.06 




336.10 


3, 


,019.96 


2,664.23 




102.84 


2, 


,561.39 


5,000.00 


5, 


,000.00 




- 


35.25 




35.25 




- 


300.00 




49.89 




250.11 


5,900.00 


4, 


,135.00 


1, 


,765.00 


5,273.63 




27.00 


5, 


,246.63 


1,750.00 


1, 


,750.00 




- 


6,600.00 


4, 


,331.64 


2, 


,268.36 


6,200.00 


1, 


,302.00 


4, 


,898.00 


395.80 




395.00 




.80 


22.00 




21.60 




.40 


2,200.00 


2, 


,025.00 




175.00 


44,600.00 


23, 


,900.00 


20, 


,700.00 


3,000.00 


1, 


,140.71 


1, 


,859.29 


17,800.00 


11, 


,069.10 


6, 


,730.90 


12,000.00 


8, 


,000.00 


4, 


,000.00 


890.00 




795.00 




95.00 


2,220.00 


2, 


,188.00 




32.00 


4,000.00 


4, 


,000.00 




- 


3,870.00 




70.00 


3, 


,800.00 


750.00 




749.50 




.50 


2,000.00 


1, 


,985.96 




14.04 


100,000.00 


100, 


,000.00 




- 


11,000.00 


11, 


,000.00 




- 


11,000.00 


11, 


,000.00 




- 


500.00 


15, 


500.00 
,129.79 




- 


32,796,97 


17, 


,667.18 


220,530.00 


180, 


,779.80 


39, 


,750.20 


253,326.97 - 


195, 


,909.59 


57, 


,417.38 


3,163.24 


3, 


,163.24 






2,418.01 


2, 


,418.01 




- 


200,000.00 


172, 


,896.64 


27, 


,103.36 


702,878.07 


614, 


,342.88 


88, 


,535.19 


60,000.00 


32, 


,936.00 


27, 


,064.00 



116 



Building Construction - continued: 
Cemetery Building: 

Article 23, 3-14-66 
Article 19, 12-5-66 

Chapter 90 Construction: 
Available from 1965 
Article 12, 3-8-65 (High Street) 
Article 12, 3-14-66 {High Street) 

Total Available 

Total Construction: 

Available from 1965 

Bond issue 

Acton Memorial Library Fund 

Transfer 
Appropriated 



Total Departmental Items: 
Appropriated - 1966 
Available from 1965 
Reserve fund transfers 
Federal and State Aid 
Bond issue 
Other 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 



37,260.00 
5,000.00 



52,500.00 
6,298.00 
6,900.00 

65,698.00 



764,839.31 
200,000.00 

2,418.01 
109,160.00 

1,076,417.32 



,807,580.26 

859,130.06 

10,414.90 

80,460.91 

200,000.00 

119,898.99 



Cash 
Disbursed 



2,232.28 



51,195.97 



668,702.09 
172,896.64 

2,418.01 
35,168.28 

879,185.02 



2,588,686.47 

744,074.42 

9,449.08 

60,653.80 

172,896.64 

108,852.58 



Other Cash Disbursements: 
Agency: 

S,tate assessment system 

State audit of municipal accounts 

State parks and reservations 

State motor vehicle excise bills 

Middlesex County tax 

Middlesex County Hospital assessment 

Middlesex County dog licenses 

Withheld Federal income taxes 

Withheld State income taxes 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield 

Middlesex County Retirement Assoc. 

Mass. Teachers' Retirement Fund 

Acton Teachers ' Insurance 

Acton Employees' life insurance 

Acton Teachers' Association 



407.52 

1,688.76 

7,286.96 

984.60 

63,764.12 

992.99 

2,335.75 

116,393.37 

15,357.59 

9,887.64 

17,138.70 

22,260.86 

1,348.85 

1,088.24 

2,530.00 



Balance 



$ 35,027.72 
5,000.00 



14,502.03 



96,137.22 
27,103.36 



73,991.72 
197,232.30 



218,893.79 

115,055.64 

965.82 

19,807.11 

27,103.36 

11,046.41 



$4,077,485.12 3,684,612.99 $392,872.13 



Trust: 

Charity 

Firemen's Relief Fund 

Trust fund income 

Acton High School Trust Fund 

Refunds: 

Taxes 

Unclaimed check issued 

Building permits 

Federal Grant - Sewerage Study 

Project #3281 
Premium on bond 
Anticipation of revenue notes 
Tax title foreclosure cost 
Investment in Certificate of Deposit 

Total cash paid in 1966 on order 
of Board of Selectmen, as shown 
in Town Treasurer's report 



1,615.00 

280.00 

18,225.56 

230.38 



35,355.64 

7.95 

141.50 



21,750.00 

3,598.00 

400,000.00 

25.00 

200,000.00 



$4,629,307.97 



I 



117 



Cash: 

Petty cash funds 
General funds 
Conservation fund 

Accounts receivable: 

Tax levies: 

1964-Personal property 

1965-Real estate 

Personal property 

1956-Real estate 

Personal property 

Total Property Taxes 

Street assessment and 
committed interest 

Motor vehicle excise - 
1963 
1964 
1965 
1966 

Tax titles 

Tax possessions 

Taxes in litigation 

Total Taxes 

Departmental : 

Recreation 
Citizens ' Library 
Planning Board 
Cemetery 
Highway 

Aid to highways : 

Commonwealth of Mass. 
Middlesex County 

Under-estimate of assessment: 

1956 Middlesex County tax 
1966 State Park 



ASSETS 



2,410.70 
3,045.20 

56,624.13 
8,620.83 



365.20 
2,421.66 
3,928.17 

41,243.01 

7,184.20 
305.80 



$ 70.00 

618,063.57 

28,025.93 



60.20 

5,455.90 

65,244.96 
70,761.06 

285.54 



47,958.04 

7,490.00 
153.38 





126,648.02 


77.50 




11.00 




50.00 




46.00 




891.64 


1,076.14 


91,400.00 




36,000.00 


127,400.00 



TOWN OF 
BALANCE 

DECEMBER 



$646,159.50 



12,315.76 
1,302.13 



255,124.16 



13,617.89 



Total Assets 



$914,901.55 



118 



ACTON 

SHEET 
31, 1966 



LIABILITIES AM) RESERVES 



Employees ' payroll deductions - 

See Schedule 1 $ 21,185.76 

Guarantee deposits: 

Board of Appeals $ 63.50 

Planning Board 352.25 415.75 

Unclaimed checks 501.95 

Trust fund income transfer balances 

unexpended - See Schedule 2 5,687.88 

Federal grants - See Schedule 3 20,626.79 

Revolving fund - School Dept. Cafeteria 5,374.34 

Unexpended appropriation balances - 

See Schedule 4 287,196.45 

Middlesex County dog license fees 124.00 

Conservation Fund 25,394.33 

Cemetery Land Fund 5,655.35 

Road Machinery Fund 8,384.47 

Tax title foreclosures 155.00 

Bond forfeitures 577.82 

Premiums on notes issued: 
Police Station 
Elm Street School 

Library receipts reserved for appropriations 
Reserve for petty cash funds 

Revenue reserved until collected: 

Street assessment and committed interest 

Motor vehicle excise 

Tax titles and possessions 

Taxes in litigation 

Departmental 

Aid to highways 

Overlays reserved for abatements of 
tax levies: 

1964 60.20 

1965 5,455.90 

1966 4,923.29 10,439.39 

Overlay surplus - rese&ve fund 12,540.48 

Surplus revenue 320,689. 59 

Total Liabilities and Reserves $914, 901. 55 



90.00 




.60 


90.60 




5,428.50 




70.00 


285.54 




47,958.04 




7,490.00 




153.38 




1,076.14 




127,400.00 


184,363.10 



I 



119 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
Apportioned Street Assessments Not Due $ 4 , 845 . 69 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



120 



LOANS AUTHORIZED - NOT ISSUED 
Elm Street Elementary School ' 75,000.00 



Net Funded on Fixed Debt 1,475,000.00 



TRUST ACCOUNTS 

Trust Funds - Cash and Securities: 

In Custody of the Town Treasurer 551,845.69 

In Custody of Trustees 3,465.44 

$ 555,311.13 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
Street Assessments and Betterment $ 4,845.69 



LOANS NOT AUTHORIZED - NOT ISSUED 
Elm Street Elementary School 75,000.00 

DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Inside Debt Limit: 

Florence A. Merriam Elementary School $110,000.00 
Julia McCarthy Elementary School 20,000.00 

Julia McCarthy School Addition 10,000.00 

Police Station 60,000.00 

Acton Memorial Library Addition 200,000.00 400,000.00 

Outside Debt Limit: 

Florence A. Merriam Elementary School 330,000.00 

Julia McCarthy Elementary School 60,000.00 

Elm Street Elementary School 685.000.00 1.075.000.00 

1.475,000.00 

TRUST ACCOUNTS 

In Custody of Town Treasurer - See Schedule 5 551,845.69 

In Custody of Trustees: 

Charlotte Goodnow 3,465.44 

$ 555,311.13 



121 



I 



BALANCE SHEET 
Supporting Schedules 
December 31, 1965 

Schedule 1 
Employees ' Payroll Deductions 



Federal income taxes 
Massachusetts income taxes 
Blue Cross - Blue Shield 
Middlesex County Retirement System 
Group Life Insurance 
Massachusetts Teachers' Retirement 
Teachers ' Insurance 



Schedule 2 
Trust Fund Income Balances 



$14,021,50 
1,801.02 
1,004.71 
1,763.22 

103.30 
2,390.26 

101.75 

$21,185.76 



Perpetual care 
Elbridge Robbins 
Susan Noyes Hosmer 
Arlette Appleyard 
Luke Blanchard 
J. Roland Wetherbee 
Georgia E. Whitney 
Hoitt and Scott 
Henry S . Raymond 
Frank Knowlton 
Robert I . Davis 
Sarah A. Watson 
Carrie F. Wells 
George T. Ames 
Mrs. Harry O'Neil 
A. B. Conant 



241.94 

6.50 

5,090.61 

10.70 

9.16 
15.32 
33.56 
42.51 
55.13 
49.28 

7.70 
34.91 
30.00 
11.36 
45.75 

3.45 



Schedule 3 
Federal Grants 



$ 5,687.88 



Welfare Administration: 

Old age assistance 

Aid to dependent children 

Disability assistance 

Medical assistance 
Old age assistance 
Medical assistance 
Aid to dependent children 
Disability assistance 

Total Welfare Federal Grants 

School Federal Grants: 
Public Law 815 
Public Law 864 - Title 5 
Public Law 874 



$ 14.75 




22.16 




21.72 




23.32 


$ 81.95 




6,500.95 




200.00 




300.00 




56.32 




7,139.22 


819.68 




3,571.19 




9,096.70 


13.487.57 




$20,626.79 



122 



Special Articles: 



Schedule 4 
Unexpended Appropriation Balances 



Town 




Meeting 


Article 


Date 


No. 


6-24-57 




6-24-57 




3-10-58 


39 


3- 9-58 


17 


3-14-60 


31 


12-12-60 


6 


3-12-62 


46 


3-12-62 


60 


3-12-62 


64 


3-11-63 


44 


3-11-63 


58 


1-20-64 


3 


1- 9-64 


14 


3- 9-64 


24 


6- 8-64 


3 


6- 8-64 


4 


10-19-64 


1 


3- 8-65 


9 


3- 8-65 


17 


3- 8-65 


22 


3- 8-65 


34 


3- 8-65 


38 


11-15-65 


2 


11-15-55 


5 


3-14-66 


14 


3-14-66 


15 


3-14-66 


16 


3-14-66 


18 


3-14-66 


21 


3-14-66 


26 


3-14-66 


27 


3-14-66 


30 


3-14-66 


32 


3-14-66 


33 


3-14-66 


34 


6- 6-66 


6 


12- 5-66 


12 



Purpose 

Civil Defense - gonset rigs 
Civil Defense - power unit 
Archives Committee 
Mount Hope Cemetery clearing 
Cemeteries layout 
Conservation Commission 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Hydrant - Pope Road 
Auxiliary Fire Department - 

raincoats and boots 
Compilation of Town By-Laws 
Civil Defense - gonset rigs 
Assessors ' Map 
Police Station Construction 
Sprinkler system - Towne School 
Accounting equipment 
Mount Hope Cemetery - oiling 
Flerra School Land 
Revaluation 

Water District Study Committee 
Town Hall sprinkler system 
Cemetery Building Committee 
Auxiliary Fire Department 
Dump body 

Stock pile top soil 

Construction - Hosmer, Prospect, Charter 
Chapter 81 - 90 maintenance 
Surplus Government Property 
Snow fighting equipment 
Lease - Haartz Property 
Sewerage Study Committee 
M. B. T. A. 
Fogging generator 
Police cruisers 
Water Safety Program 
Fence - Gardiner Playground 
Health Insurance - Aged 
Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Committee 

Total Special Articles 



Construction in Process: 
Chapter 90 

Julia McCarthy School Addition 
Elm Street Elementary School #1 
Elm Street Elementary School #2 
Library Addition 
Cemetery Building 
Sidewalks 



$14,502.03 
429.99 
88,535.19 
27,064.00 
27,103.36 
40,027.72 
5,000.00 



Balance 

625.00 
300.00 

1,000.00 
744.00 
200.00 
200.00 
199.50 

1,000.00 

435.00 

2,500.00 

475.00 

3,019.96 

46.33 

2,561.39 

61.05 

429.94 

1,000.00 

1,765.00 

100.00 

5,246.63 

.80 

13.45 

175.00 

600.00 

16,444.95 

20,700.00 

1,859.29 

6,730.90 

4,000.00 

250.11 

2,268.36 

32.00 

4,000.00 

3,800.00 

.50 

1,500.00 

250.00 

84,534.16 



202,662.29 



$287,196.45 



I 



123 



Schedule 5 
Trust Accounts in Custody of Town Treasurer 

Charity Funds: 

Elizabeth M, White $ 28,913.03 

Georgia E. Whitney 14,477.99 

Betsy M. Ball 17,510.59 

Varnum Tuttle Memorial 13,233.17 

Cemetery Funds: 

Arlette Appleyard 2,080.14 

Henry S. Raymond - Monument 1,319.43 

Henry S. Raymond - Care 2,851.55 

Hoit and Scott 748.00 

J. Roland Wetherbee 14,951.97 

Perpetual Care 139,843.61 

Luke Blanchard 2,943.66 

Frank C. Hayward 1,7 93.56 

Georgia E. Whitney 2,085.42 

Susan Noyes Hosmer 104,129.82 

Dr. Robert I. Davis 1,292.20 

Frank R. Knowlton 1,258.44 

George T. Ames 557.97 

Mrs. Harry O'Neil 421.96 

Sarah A. Watson 3,125.18 

Carrie F. Wells 3,880.68 

A. B. Conant Family 1,234.30 

Elbridge Jones Robbins 1,113.84 

Library and Educational Funds: 

Acton High School 5,015.85 

Wilde Memorial Library 35,803.75 

Georgia E. Whitney Memorial 19,849.75 

Conservation Fund: $28,025.93 

Less - amount included in 

general fund cash 28, 025 . 93 - 

Firemen's Relief Funds: 

Acton 14,108.38 

West Acton 1,277.14 

Stabilization Fund: 116,024.31 

$551,845.69 



124 



SUPPLEMENTARY FINANCIAL DATA 

The unexpended balances of the following Special Articles were closed 
out at the end of 1955 to Surplus Revenue: 

Town 
Meeting Article 
Date No. Description Balance 

5- 7-55 4 Mount Hope Cemetery Fence $ .40 

3-14-55 29 Replace Flag Pole - Repair Monument 95.00 

3-14-55 35 Vocational Tuition and Transportation 14.04 

109.44 



The Finance Committee approved the following transfers from the 
Reserve Fund during the year ended December 31, 1956: 

Appropriation $15,000.00 

Transfers: 

Date 
4-11-55 Fire Hydrant rental $ 50.00 

10-14-55 Fire Hydrant rental 3,950.00 $4,000.00 

5-18-65 Downey Property 500.00 
5-15-55 Legal services - 

Library bonds, etc. 411.90 

7- 7-56 Blanchard Auditorium-oil tank 285.00 

8- 5-55 Interest or anticipation of 

revenue loan 385.00 

9-14-56 Insurance premiums 202.00 

9-25-55 Recreation Commission 130.00 

10-10-65 Gas.Sc Plumbing Inspectors 800.00 

10-13-66 Veterans' Aid 2,000.00 

11- 1-55 Group Health 800.00 

12- 5-55 Wire Inspector 800.00 

12- 6-65 Board of Selectmen - expenses 500.00 11.014.90 

Balance Returned to Overlay Surplus $ 3,985.10 

As a result of fully consumed appropriations, the following 1966 

vendors' invoices remain unpaid as at December 31, 1955: 

New England Traffic Safety Lines $1,599.30 

Lowell Iron and Steel Co. 15.38 

Files Equipment Company 111.55 

G. Waldo Livermore 230.15 

C. N. Wood Co., Inc. 375.90 

Eastern Minerals, Inc. 1,089.08 

Hydraulics Co. 115.00 

Globe Rubber Works, Inc. 19.42 

Brockway Motor Trucks 6.00 

Becker Auto Supply Co. 1.84 

Field Machinery Co. 3.36 

International Harvester Company 7.58 

S. P. Andelman, Inc. 40.00 

Leo S. Cavelier, Inc. 2.64 

Plasticrete Boston Corporation 5.17 

Bursaw Gas & Oil 343.50 

The Center Store 9.97 

Baker Oil Company, Inc. 155.98 

$4,243.03 



125 



ASSESSORS 



The Board of Assessors wish to express their appreciation to all property owners in the Town of Acton for 
their cooperation during the revaluation program which has now been completed. We are pleased with the over- 
all program and feel that the number of inequities which existed have now been reduced to a minimum. 

This has been a very busy year for the Assessors and the capable clerical help in the Assessors office. Com- 
plete new records of all the taxable real estate and personal property in the Town of Acton have been set up and are 
now in full operation. Four thousand, four hundred and thirty-five parcels have been catalogued, priced, indexed 
and located on the Town Atlas. 

Meetings were held twice each week for the past four months, including evening and Saturday meetings, on 
matters relating to adjustments, abatements and other business in connection with the revaluation program. The 
Assessors attended approximately twenty State, County and Area meetings during the year and Dewey Boatman 
attended the Assessors School at the University of Massachusetts for the third consecutive year. 

As of January 1, 1967 there are approximately three hundred properties representing new construction, addi- 
tions and improvements to existing buildings which must be inspected, catalogued and priced prior to a determina- 
tion of the tax rate for 1967. 

Inasmuch as the actual cost to you in dollars as a taxpayer in Acton will more or less be determined by the 
appropriations voted at the Annual Town Meeting in March, we suggest that you attend the Finance Committee hear- 
ing, give thorough consideration to each article and then vote at Town Meeting. 



Taxes Assessed as Follows: 

Buildings Exclusive of Land 

Land 

Personal 

Total Valuation 

Valuation - January 1, 1965 

Increase in Valuation 

Rate of Taxation - $29.00 per $1000 
Real Estate 
Personal Property 
Total Taxes Assessed 

Amount of "Money Raised: 

State Parks and Reservations 
State Audit & Municipal Accounts 
State Assessment System 
Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
County Tax 

Tuberculosis Hospital Grant 
Town Grant 
Overlay 



;50, 232, 630. 00 

16, 348, 410. 00 

3. 728. 755. 00 



1, 930, 850. 16 
108. 133. 89 



5, 984. 83 

1, 688. 76 

407. 52 

984. 60 

54, 697. 04 

992. 99 

1, 924, 228. 31 

50. OOP. 00 



$70, 309, 795. 00 

18. 408. 058. 00 

$51, 901, 737. 00 



$ 2, 038, 984. 05 



$ 2, 038, 984. 05 



Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 

Number of Vehicles Assessed - 6536 
Commissioners Value of Motor Vehicles &: Trailers 



$ 5, 073, 525, 00 



Rate of Excise - $66.00 per $1000 
Total Excise 
Added Excise of 1965 

Number of Vehicles - Added Excise - 897 
Value of Vehicles - Added Excise 



309, 273.33 
20, 558. 50 

954, 650. 00 



Dewey E. Boatman 

Carl C. Flint 

John E. Dunphy, Jr. 

Board of Assessors 



126 



COLLECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 



Abatement Rescinded 
Payments to Treasurer 



Outstanding January 1, 1966 
Abatement Rescinded 

Payments to Treasurer 
Outstanding December 31, 1966 



Outstanding January 1, 1966 

Payments to Treasurer 
Transferred to Tax Titles 
Outstanding December 31, 1966 



Outstanding January 1, 1966 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 



Outstanding January 1, 1966 
Refunds 

Payments to Treasurer 
Transferred to Tax Titles 
Outstanding December 31, 1966 



Commitment per Warrant 
Refunds 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 



Commitment per Warrants 
Refunds 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Transferred to Tax Titles 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1963 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1964 



$ 


318. 20 
8. 60 


266. 60 
60. 20 



REAL ESTATE TAXES - 1964 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1965 



REAL ESTATE TAXES - 1965 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1966 



3, 008. 40 

469. 20 

3, 045. 20 



40, 


464. 


12 




243. 


93 


35, 


426. 


95 


2, 


870. 


40 


2. 


410. 


70 



108, 133. 89 
633. 53 



94, 


214. 


90 


5. 


931. 


69 


8, 


620. 


83 



REAL ESTATE TAXES - 1966 



1, 930, 850. 16 
24. 661. 25 

1, 854, 218. 63 

40, 941. 57 

3, 727. 08 

56, 624. 13 



MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1962 



Outstanding January 1, 1966 
Abatements Rescinded 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 



444. 28 
11. 90 



11. 90 
444. 28 




8. 30 
8. 30 



326. 80 



326. 80 



3, 376. 00 





3, 001. 90 
374. 10 



3.376.00 


65 




6, 522. 80 



6, 522. 80 



40, 708. 05 



40, 708. 05 



108, 767. 42 



108, 767. 42 



1, 955, 511. 41 



1, 955, 511. 41 



456. 18 



456. 18 



127 



I 



MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1963 

Outstanding January 1, 1966 

Abatements Rescinded 88. 28 2, 174. 81 



$ 2, 


086. 53 
88. 28 


1, 


88.28 
721. 33 
365. 20 



641. 


06 


3, 743. 


35 


2, 421. 


66 



Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 365. 20 2, 174. 81 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1964 

Outstanding January 1, 1966 6, 708. 64 

Abatements Rescinded 97. 43 6, 806. 07 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 2, 421. 6 6 6. 806. 07 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1965 

Outstanding January 1, 1966 30,863.34 

Commitments per Warrant 8, 082. 68 

Refunds 2. 646. 34 41,592.36 

Payments to Treasurer 32, 033. 47 

Abatements 5, 630. 72 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 3, 928. 17 41, 592. 36 

MOTOR VEHICLE AND TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1966 

Commitment per Warrants 309,273.33 

Refunds 7. 168. 58 316,441.91 

Payments to Treasurer 255, 917. 77 

Abatements 19, 281. 13 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 41, 243. 01 316. 441. 91 

FARM ANIMAL EXCISE - 1966 

Commitment per Warrant 144. 88 

Payments to Treasurer 144. 88 

STREET BETTERMENTS ADDED TO TAXES - 1965 

Outstanding January 1, 1966 84. 73 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatement 19. 12 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 65. 61 84. 73 

COMMITTED INTEREST - 1965 

Outstanding January 1, 1966 33. 91 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 7. 65 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 26. 26 33. 91 

STREET BETTERMENTS ADDED TO TAXES - 1966 

Commitment per Warrant 905. 36 

Apportionments in Full 344. 30 1, 249. 66 

Payments to Treasurer 1, 124. 72 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 124. 94 1. 249. 66 

COMMITTED INTEREST - 1966 

Commitment per Warrant 230. 03 

Payments to Treasurer 161. 30 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 68. 73 230. 03 



128 



INTEREST AND COSTS ON TAXES - EXCISE - ASSESSMENTS 

Collections 1966 $ $ 2, 152. 10 

Payments to Treasurer 2. 152. 10 

CERTIFICATES - MUNICIPAL LIENS 

Collections 1966 1,014.00 

Payments to Treasurer 1, 014. 00 

TAXES IN LITIGATION 

Transferred to Taxes in Litigation 

Real Estate Taxes 1961 23. 56 

Real Estate Taxes 1962 25. 42 

Real Estate Taxes 1963 33. 20 

Real Estate Taxes 1964 34. 40 

Real Estate Taxes 1965 36. 80 153.28 

Balance December 31, 1966 153. 28 

APPORTIONED STREET ASSESSMENTS 

Balance January 1, 1966 

Apportionments 344.30 6,729.55 

Payments to Treasurer in Advance 

Added to Taxes 1966 

Outstanding December 31, 1966 

Due 1967 to 1984 inclusive 5. 479. 89 6. 729. 55 

Wm. Henry Soar 
Town Collector 



NOT DUE 




6. 385. 


25 


344. 


30 


344. 


30 


905. 


36 


5.479. 


89 



TREASURER 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1966 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Cash Balance January 1, 1966 $ 400, 396. 82 

STATE AND COUNTY RECEIPTS 

State Treasurer 

Old Age Assistance, Federal $ 15, 556. 16 

Medical Aid to Aged, Federal 23,063.56 

Aid to Dependent Children, Federal 11,457.72 

Disability Assistance, Federal 1, 193. 74 

Medical Assistance, Federal 2, 528. 98 

Old Age Assistance, Adm., Federal 39. 35 

Medical Aid to Aged Adm., Federal 13. 32 

Aid to Dependent Children Adm., Federal 13. 81 

Disability Assistance Adm., Federal 3.71 

Medical Assistance Adm., Federal 16. 13 

Old Age Assistance 12, 106. 19 

Medical Aid to Aged 14,355.42 

Aid Dependent Children 12,322.37 

Disability Assistance 8, 702. 17 

Medical Assistance 6, 489. 68 

Old Age Assistance Adm. 54. 84 



129 



State Treasurer (cont'd.) 

Medical Aid to Aged Adm. 

Aid Dependent Children Adm 

Disability Assistance Adm. 

Medical Assistance Adm. 

Highways Chapter 90 

Highways Chapter 81 

Public Library 

Snow Removal 

Corporation Taxes 

School Aid Chapter 70 

School Aid Chapter 69 &t 71 

Meal Taxes 

State Income Taxes 

School Construction, 

School Construction, 

School Construction, 

School Construction, 

Veterans Service 

Vocational Education 

Transportation 

Loss of Taxes 

National Defense, P. L. 864-5 

Land Acquisition Project 1 

Valuation Basis, Chapter 660 

Library Construction, Federal 



McCarthy Addition 
McCarthy 
Merriam 
Elm Street #1 



29. 81 

17. 79 

2. 94 

2. 18 

1, 500. 00 

10, 316. 80 

1, 809. 50 

1, 035. 75 
8, 388. 87 

110. 893. 84 
7, 890. 40 

3, 417. 63 
19, 124. 93 

5, 714. 19 

5, 567. 89 

20, 057. 63 

18, 750. 00 

7, 074. 23 

624. 55 

40, 835. 00 

2, 393. 75 

4, 128. 56 
2, 250. 00 

98, 427. 00 
15, 750. 00 



$ 493,920.39 



County Treasurer 

Dog Licenses 
Highways 



DEPARTMENTAL RECEIPTS 



1, 270. 79 
1, 500. 00 



2, 770. 79 



Town Collector 

Personal Property Taxes - 1964 

Real Estate Taxes - 1964 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes - 1964 

Personal Property Taxes - 1965 

Real Estate Taxes - 1965 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes - 1965 

Personal Property Taxes - 1966 

Real Estate Taxes - 1966 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes - 1966 

Street Betterments 

Committed Interest 

Lien Certificates 

Care of Cemetery Lots 

Total Interest 

Personal Property Taxes - 1963 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes - 1963 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes - 1962 

Farm Animal Excise Taxes - 1966 

Town Clerk 

Sporting License Fees 
Dog License Fees 
Certificates - Vital 
Mortgage Fees 
Business Certificates 
Miscellaneous 
Dog Licenses 

Board of Assessors 

Maps 
Valuation Books 

Employee's Payroll Deductions 

Federal Withholding 
State Withholding 
County Retirement 





266. 60 


3, 


001. 90 




641. 06 


3. 


008. 40 


35, 


426. 95 


32. 


033.47 


94, 


214. 90 


1, 854, 


218. 63 


255, 


917.77 


1, 


124. 72 




161.30 


1, 


014. 00 




731. 50 


2, 


152. 10 




8. 30 




88.28 




11.90 




144. 88 




129. 45 




265. 50 




377.00 




845. 00 




38.00 




743. 50 


2, 


348. 25 




454. 05 




631. 00 


120, 


254. 43 


15, 


866. 83 


17, 


366. 35 



2, 284, 166. 66 



4. 746. 70 



1, 085. 05 



130 



Employee's Payroll Deductions (cont'd.) 

Teacher's Retirement 
Blue Cross 
Group Insurance 
School Insurance 
Teacher's Association 

School Department 

Miscellaneous 

Rental Fees 

Federal Grants - P. L. 874 

Lunch Account 

Rental Reimbursements 

Board of Selectmen 

Miscellaneous 
Licenses 
Wiring Permits 
Building Permits 
Sale of Fire Truck 

Cemetery Department 

Miscellaneous 
Chapel Fees 
Sale of Lots 
Burials 

Police Department 

Miscellaneous 
Pistol Permits 
Dealers Permits 
Bicycle Registrations 

Highway Department 

Machinery Account 

Fire Department 

Miscellaneous 

Permits 

Rental of Stations 

Board of Health 

Miscellaneous 
Sewerage Permits 
Nurse Services 
Plumbing Permits 
Gas Permits 

Miscellaneous Receipts 

Plaza Restaurant License 
Beef k Ale License 
Village Package Store License 
Notar's Package Store License 
Colonial Wine Shop License 
Mail Coach Restaurant License 
Nagog Grille License 
Recipients Old Age Assistance 
Recipients Medical Aid to Aged 
Recipients Aid Dependent Children 
Lockes Window Service Buildings 
Recipients General Relief 
Planning Board Hearings 
Employees Group Insurance 
Employees Blue Cross 
Board of Appeals Hearing 
West Acton Library Fines 
Memorial Library Fines 
Ella Campbell Property Rental 



$ 24, 


651. 


12 


9. 


384. 


64 




946. 


40 


1, 


450. 


60 


2, 


430. 


00 


1, 


080. 


15 


1, 


215. 


00 


22, 


321. 


00 


83, 


458. 


87 


11, 


522. 


61 




390. 


50 


1, 


379. 


00 


2, 


696. 


90 


7, 


859. 


50 




817. 


00 


1, 


, 163. 


40 




135. 


00 




900. 


00 


2, 


,355. 


00 




74. 


00 




172. 


00 




40. 


00 




172. 


50 



5. 874. 93 





159. 


00 




102. 


00 




626. 


00 




370. 


00 


1, 


510. 


00 


1, 


285. 


80 


2, 


904. 


50 


1, 


459. 


50 



$ 192,350.37 



750. 00 
1, 010. 00 
1, 500. 00 
1, 500. 00 

1, 500. 00 

2, 500. 00 
2, 500. 00 
4, 784. 60 

273. 65 
230. 35 
159. 00 
237. 25 
250. 00 
66. 56 
678. 57 
180. 00 
148. 87 
2, 361. 88 
600. 00 



119, 597. 63 



13, 142. 90 



4. 553. 40 



458. 50 



5, 874. 93 



887. 00 



7, 529. 80 



I 



131 



Miscellaneous Receipts (cont'd.) 

Concord District Court Fines 

Boston Mutual Life Ins., Group Insurance 

Arlington Trust Co., Certificate Deposit 

Arlington Trust Co., Interest on Deposit 

National Shawmut Bank, Certificate Deposit 

National Shawmut Bank, Interest on Deposit 

Conservation Fund, Article 18 - 1965 

Dog Officer, Sale of Dogs 

Treasurer, United States, Sewerage Study 

Christie & Thompson Highway Department 

Middlesex County National Bank, Library Bonds 

Middlesex County National Bank, Bond Premium 

Janet F. Turley, Munroe Tax Title 

Janet F. Turley, Interest Tax Title 

Estate of Lydia Griffin - Memorial Library 

Middlesex County National Bank - Interest 

Fire Companies, Firemen's Relief Fund 

Celebrations Committee - Miscellaneous 

Unclaimed Checks 

Auto Machine Service - Highway Department 

Time Incorporated, Memorial Library 

Water Supply District, Recreation 

Sealer of Weights k Measures Fees 

Arlington Trust Co., Note 453 

Nashoba Service Inc. Board of Health 

Town of Maynard - School Department 

H. G. Davis, Inc. - Highway Department 

Blue Cross -Blue Shield - Earned Premium 

Roland O. Livermore - Rental Town Hall 

Warren Publishing Co. - Selectmen 

Recreation Department - Miscellaneous 

Norman Roman Enterprise - Tax Title 

Norman Roman Enterprise - Interest Tax Title 

Town of Concord - Lieu of Taxes 

Hayden & Buchanan - Engineering Department 

Field & Cowles - Fire Insurance 

. 3rd District Court Fines 

"^Percival Wood - Apartment Rent 
Treasurer, United States - Civil Defense 



1, 087. 35 

217. 36 

300, 000. 00 

3, 589. 58 
700, 000. 00 

8, 048. 61 

4, 500. 00 

15. 00 
21, 750. 00 

46. 09 

200, 000. 00 

598. 00 

129. 37 

12. 63 

500. 00 

780. 00 

280. 00 

18. 80 

230. 14 

7. 81 

4. 30 

9. 44 

378. 80 

400, 000. 00 

2. 98 

37. 50 

30. 97 

3, 891. 00 

250. 00 

25. 67 

143. 70 

456. 45 

11. 85 

57. 42 

16. 50 
1, 241. 20 

150. 00 
120. 00 
178. 75 



$1, 670, 048. 00 



PERPETUAL CARE - WOODLAWN CEMETERY 



Robert E. Balmat 

Alfred Conrod 

Winthrop Warren 

Alice Whitcomb 

Allen Whitney 

Marian L. Piper 

Samuel Knowlton 

Fred L. Rayner 

Nellie B. Wilkes 

Alvin R. Piper 

Elizabeth Weyn 

Stella Bacharski 

Jessie Redmond 

Frederick and Joan Lindquist 



100. 00 
50. 00 
100. 00 
150. 00 
200. 00 
200. 00 
200. 00 
200. 00 
100. 00 
100. 00 
100. 00 
100. 00 
150. 00 
200. 00 



1, 950. 00 



PERPETUAL CARE - MT. HOPE CEMETERY 



Now ell & Brine 
Marion L. Beach 
Louis Christie, Jr. 
Rodney Kidder 
'■Howard Hall 
Estate Margaret Allsopp 
Adrian Dartee 



200. 00 
200. 00 

50. 00 
200. 00 
200. 00' 
100. 00 

50. 00 



1, 000. 00 



TRUST FUND INCOME 



Stabilization Fund 

Acton High School Library Fund 

Arlette Appleyard Cemetery Fund 



1, 562. 50 
205. 95 
113. 75 



132 



Trust Fund Income (cont'd.) 

Betsey M. Ball Fund 

Cemetery Fund 

A. B. Conant Cemetery Fund 

Conservation Fund 

Elbridge Jones Robbins Fund 

Elizabeth White Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Memorial Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Cemetery Fund 

Frank C. Hayward Cemetery Fund 

Hoit &c Scott Cemetery Fund 

Blanchard Monument Fund 

Blanchard Memorial Fund 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 

H. S. Raymond Monument Fund 

H. S. Raymond Cemetery Fund 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Cemetery Fund 

Varnum Tuttle Memorial Fund 

J. Roland Wetherbee Cemetery Fund 

Acton Memorial Library Building Fund 

Acton Memorial Library Fund 

Acton Memorial Library Tainter Fund 

Sarah Watson Cemetery Fund 

Frank Knowlton Cemetery Fund 

Acton Firemens Relief Fund 

George T. Ames Fund 

Robert Davis Cemetery Fund 

Harry O'Neil Cemetery Fund 

Carrie F. Wells Cemetery Fund 



425. 11 

4, 567. 22 

56. 88 

1, 386. 28 

56. 88 

1, 120. 17 

853. 13 

681. 87 

48. 76 

56. 88 

28. 44 
15. 86 
21. 96 
69. 03 

29. 10 
119. 83 

3, 694. 34 

568. 75 

473. 97 

56. 88 

862. 42 

508. 26 

103. 90 

44. 98 

383. 14 

19. 76 

44. 99 

15. 82 

135. 00 



$ 18,331.81 



TRANSFERS TO TOWN ACCOUNT 



Acton Memorial Library 

Elizabeth White Fund 

Arlette Appleyard Cemetery Fund 

J. Roland Wetherbee Cemetery Fund 

Cemetery Fund 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Cemetery Fund 

Conservation Fund 

High School Library Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Fund 



2, 418. 01 

850. 00 

50. 00 

100. 00 

1, 000. 00 

8, 000. 00 

11, 147. 40 

230. 38 

765. 00 



24, 560. 79 



Total Receipts for the Year 1966 
Cash Balance January 1, 1966 

Paid Selectmen's Orders for 1966 
Cash Balance December 31, 1966 



Year 

1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 



Schools 

$ 105, 000 
95, 000 
95, 000 
95, 000 
85, 000 
85, 000 
75, 000 
75, 000 
75, 000 
75, 000 
75, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 
35, 000 

$1, 215, 000 



OUTSTANDING NOTES AND BONDS 



Police Station 

$20, 000 
20, 000 
20, 000 



Library Addition 

$ 25, 000 
25, 000 
25, 000 
25, 000 
25, 000 
25, 000 
25, 000 
25, 000 



$4. 


846, 974. 
400, 396. 


72 
82 


$5, 
4, 


247, 371. 
629.307. 


54 
97 


$ 


618. 063. 


57 




Total 





$60, 000 



$200, 000 



$ 150, 000 

140, 000 

140. 000 

120, 000 

110, 000 

110, 000 

100, 000 

100, 000 

75, 000 

75, 000 

75. 000 

35, 000 

35. 000 

35. 000 

35, 000 

35. 000 

35, 000 

35. 000 

35. 000 

$1. 475. 000 



133 



ACTON HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 
Received to Fund in 1966 
Contributions 
Interest 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received for Perpetual Care 
Received Interest for 1966 

Cash on Hand 

Transfers to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



4, 000. GO 
987. 11 



ACTON FIREMENS RELIEF FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



$ 8,465.00 
4. 775. 92 

280. 00 
587. 46 



GEORGE T. AMES CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



465.49 
69. 13 



ARLETTE APPLE YARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



$ 2, 000. 00 
15. 00 



BETSEY M. BALL FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



10, 095. 26 
6. 638. 99 



CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



98, 647. 21 
33, 301. 55 

2, 950. 00 
5. 944. 85 

200. 00 
1. 000. 00 



4, 987. 24 
259. 12 

5, 246. 36 

5, 246. 36 



$ 13, 240. 92 

827. 46 

$ 14, 108. 38 

$ 14, 108. 38 



534. 62 

23. 35 

557. 97 

557. 97 



$ 2,015.00 

115. 14 

$ 2, 130. 14 

50. 00 
$ 2, 080. 14 

$ , 2, 130. 14 



16, 734. 25 
776. 34 

17, 510. 59 

17, 510. 59 



$131, 948. 76 



8, 894. 85 
$140, 843. 61 

1, 200. 00 

139. 843. 61 

$140, 843. 61 



134 



A.B. CONANT CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received to Fund Article 1 
Received Interest for 1966 

Transfers to Town Account 
On Deposit December 31, 1966 



$ 1, 000. 00 
167. 96 



CONSERVATION INVESTMENT FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



$ 30, 041. 73 
1. 170. 37 

11. 000. 00 
1. 461. 23 



DR. ROBERT I. DAVIS CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 



$ 1, 000. 00 
236. 18 



On Deposit December 31, 1966 

ELBRIDGE JONES ROBBINS k DESCENDENTS FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1966 
On Deposit December 31, 1966 



$ 1, 000. 00 
53. 54 



ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



$ 25, 000. 00 
3. 511. 28 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY MEMORIAL FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



$ 15, 000. 00 
3, 789. 49 



1, 167. 96 

66. 34 

1, 234. 30 

1, 234. 30 



$ 31, 212. 10 



12. 461. 23 
$ 43, 673. 33 

15, 647. 40 
$ 28. 025. 93 
$ 43, 673. 33 



1,236. 18 

56. 02 

1. 292. 20 

1, 292. 20 



1, 053. 54 

60. 30 

1, 113. 84 

1, 113. 84 



28, 511. 28 
1, 251. 75 



$ 


29, 
28, 


763. 

850. 
913. 


03 

00 
03 


$ 


29, 


763. 


03 



$ 


18, 
1, 


789. 
060. 


49 
26 


$ 


19. 
19. 


849. 
849. 


75 
75 



135 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

Paid Trustee's Orders for 1966 
On Deposit December 31, 1966 



$ 14, 073. 70 
456. 00 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



$ 1, 500. 00 
514. 94 



FRANK C. HAYWARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



$ 1, 000. 00 
699. 33 



HOIT & SCOTT CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



MRS. HARRY O'NEIL'S CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



372. 39 
31. 98 



FRANK R. KNOWLTON CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



$ 1, 000. 00 
204. 14 



LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



$ 2,419.24 
397. 27 



14, 529. 70 
713. 29 



$ 


15, 

14, 


242. 

765. 
477. 


99 

00 
99 


i. 


15, 


242. 


99 



2, 014. 94 

70. 48 

2, 085. 42 

2. 085. 42 



1, 699. 33 

94. 23 

1, 793. 56 

1, 793. 56 



$ 


500. 00 
208. 28 


$ 

$ 


708. 28 

39. 72 

748. 00 






^ 


748. 00 



404. 37 
17. 59 



421. 96 
421. 96 



1, 204. 14 

54. 30 

1, 258. 44 

1, 258. 44 



2, 816. 51 

127. 15 

2, 943. 66 

2, 943. 66 



136 



HENRY S. RAYMOND FUND 
MONUMENT PERPETUAL CARE 

Balance January 1, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



700. 00 
566. 18 



HENRY S. RAYMOND CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



2, 000. 00 
731. 72 



SUSAN NOYES HOSMER CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



$ 82, 238. 95 
25, 126. 89 



VARNUM TUTTLE MEMORIAL FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



$ 10, 000. 00 
2, 526. 33 



ROLAND WETHERBEE CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



$ 10, 000. 00 
4. 345. 67 



ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 
Bequest to Fund 

Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



$ 32, 890. 21 
3. 303. 06 

1, 528. 49 
500. 00 



1, 266. 18 

53. 25 

1, 319. 43 

1, 319. 43 



$ 


2, 


731. 
119. 


72 
83 


$ 


2, 
2, 


851. 
851. 


55 
55 



$107, 365. 84 

4. 763. 98 

$112, 129. 84 

8, 000. 00 
$104, 129. 82 
$112, 129. 82 



$ 


12, 


526. 
706. 


33 

84 


$ 


13, 
13, 


233. 
233. 


17 
17 



14, 345. 67 
706. 30 



$ 
$ 


15, 
14, 


051. 

100. 
951. 


97 

00 
97 


$_ 


15, 


051. 


97 



$ 36, 193. 27 

2, 028. 49 
$ 38, 221. 76 

2, 418. 01 

35, 803. 75 

$ 38, 221. 76 



137 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

Added - Article 38 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



Principal Fund 

Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1966 

On Deposit December 31, 1966 



SARAH A. WATSON CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



2, 500. 00 
499. 12 



WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



1, 223. 67 
53. 47 



STABILIZATION FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



; 13, 859. 85 

2, 164. 46 

100, 000. 00 



CARRIE F. WELLS CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1966 



3, 000. 00 
707. 60 



$ 2, 999. 12 

126. 06 

$ 3. 125. 18 

$ 3. 125. 18 



1, 277. 14 
1, 277. 14 



$ 13, 859. 85 



102. 164. 46 
ill6, 024. 31 

;116, 024. 31 



$ 


3, 


707. 
173. 


60 
08 


$ 
$ 


3, 
3, 


880. 
880. 


68 
68 



Wm. Henry Soar 
Town Treasurer 



138 



TOWN OFFICERS and APPOINTMENTS 



TOWN OFFICERS 

MODERATOR 
John W. Putnam 



SELECTMEN 



Warren F. Birch 
Mary K. Hadley 
• John H. Loring 



TOWN CLERK 
Charles M. MacRae 

TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 
Wm. Henry Soar 



ASSESSORS 



Carl C. Flint 
Dewey E. Boatman 
John E. Dunphy, Jr. 



TREE WARDEN 
Franklin H. Charter 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE 



Patience H. MacPherson 
Clinton S. Curtis 
Ivar Peterson 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



Howard F. Jones 
Donald O. Nylander 
Harlan E. Tuttle 



Term 
Expires 



1967 
1968 
1969 



1967 
1968 
1969 



1967 
1968 
1969 



1967 
1968 
1969 



CONSTABLES 
Chauncey R. Fenton, Jr. T. Frederick S. Kennedy , 



TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



Doris E. Peterson 
Margaret Richter 
James L. Parker 



1967 
1968 
1969 



LOCAL AND REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEES 



George E. Neagle 
Edwin Richter 
Parker Harrison, Jr. 
*Thomas E. Wetherbee 
Albert W. Koch 
Roy J. Zabierek 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

■ *J. Huston Westover 
*'' Daniel J. O'Connor 

John S. Golden 

George W. Moulton 

"■"Resigned -- **Replacing* 



1967 
1967 
1968 
1968 
1969 
1969 



1967 

1968 
1969 



PLANNING BOARD 



Ellen C. Bryant 
David P. Tinker 
Charles D. O'Neal, Jr. 
Charles E. Orcutt, Jr. 
Beatrice C. Perkins 



Term 
Expires 

1967 
1968 
1969 
1969 
1970 



TRUSTEES OF ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 

Helen B. Wood 1967 

Hazel P. Vose 1968 

■Eleanor P. Wilson 1969 

TRUSTEES OF WEST ACTON 
FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 



James B. Wilson 
Arno H. Perkins 
H. Stuart MacGregor 



1967 
1968 
1969 



TRUSTEES OF ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 



Lloyd W. Priest 
, T. Fredericks. Kennedy 
i Clarence A. Frost 



1967 
1968 
1969 



TRUSTEES OF GOODNOW FUND 



Thelma L. Boatman 1967 

James N. Gates 1968 

Clark C. McElvein 1969 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITIZENS LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION OF WEST ACTON 



'Barbara Nylander 
Edward F. Boyden 
Percival W. Wood 



1967 
1968 
1969 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN - 1966 

EXECUTIVE CLERK 
Virginia Milbery 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Frederick H. Bubier 
John A. Norris 
Paul H. Lesure 
'Porter G. Jenks 
'Robert H. Haeberle 
Charles C. Grandy 
William B. Allred 
Joseph R. O'Neill 
William L. Chipman 
Roger Crafts 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Hayward S. Houghton 
Herschel N. Hadley 
William C. Sawyer 



ASSOCIATES 



Milford B. 
Harold W. 



Bottomley 
Flood 



1967 
1967 
1967 
1968 

1968 
1968 
1969 
1969 
1969 



1967 
1968 
1969 



1967 
1969 



I 



139 



Term 
Expires 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 
Allen H. Nelson 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 



T. Leo McCarthy 
James B. Wilson 
John F. McGrail 
- Charles M. MacRae 



1967 
1968 
1969 
Ex-Officio 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Robert J. Erickson 

CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT 
(Permanent) 

'J H. Stuart MacGregor 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

Arno H. Perkins 
Emery D. Nelson 
Franklin H. Charter 

ELECTION OFFICERS 



1969 



1967 
1968 
1969 



Precinct I 



Warden 
Clerk 
Inspectors 
Deputy Warden 
Deputy Clerk 
Deputy Inspectors 



Irene F. 



Tellers 



McLaughlin 

Inga Frost 

Alice H. May, Margaret Schene 

John F. McLaughlin 

Helen R. Edwards 

Adelaide G. Cornwall, 

Muriel F. Miller 

Edna R. Custance, Frances L. Collins, 

Marion F. Driscoll, Frances Hirsch, 

Mona V. Melymuka, Olga Andersen 



Warden 

Clerk 

Inspectors 

Deputy Warden 

Deputy Clerk 

Deputy Inspectors 

Tellers 



Warden 
Clerk 
Inspectors 
Deputy Warden 
Deputy Clerk 
Deputy Inspectors 



Tellers 



Precinct II 

Margaret Larsen 

Bertha Carr Tucker 

Martha I. Lowden, Sophia Walsh 

Ellen G. Beck 

Phyllis M. Moyer 

Hazel P. Vose, Michael J. Walsh 

Elsie T. Winslow, Nancy Nastasi, 

Ruth R. Phelps, Helen M. Young, 

Margaret I. Cullinane, Irene Young 

Precinct III 

Barbara J. McPhee 
Phyllis K. Sprague 
Martin J. Duggan, Elsie M. Godfrey ■ 
Katherine E. Nedza* 
Stanley A. Nedza 
Genevieve L. Hatch, 
Elizabeth Charter 
Minnie C. Veasie, Elizabeth H. Gray, 
..Mary H. Prentice, Esther Perry, - 
Anna G. Mahar, Lydia R. Lesure 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
Carl W. Flint 

DOG OFFICER 
Carl W. Flint 



*Resigned -- **Replacing* 
***Civil Service 
xDeceased 



Term 
Expires 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

"^'^-''George K. Hayward 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



Martin C. 
Myron M'. 
Gladys K. 



Scanlan 
Hnatio 
Mason 
Margaret M. Coughlan 
Alfred F. Steinhauer 
William J. Phillips 
Charles W. Pappas 



1967 

1968 

1969 
1969 
1970 



INSPECTOR, GAS PIPING AND GAS APPLIANCES 
Joseph G. Perry 

DEPUTY INSPECTOR, GAS PIPING 
AND GAS APPLIANCES 

Edward F. Wright 

FENCE VIEWER 
X Allan R. Murray 

FIELD DRIVER 
William C. Kazokas 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Franklin H. Charter 

BURIAL AGENT 
Norman L. Roche 

^ VETERAN'S AGENT 

Norman L. Roche 

DIRECTOR OF VETERANS' SERVICES 
^ Norman L. Roche 

VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 

INSPECTOR OF WIRES 
Leslie F. Parke 

DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF WIRES 
Lawrence I. Tucker 

POLICE OFFICERS 

***Edward J. Collins, Jr., Chief 
***Chauncey R. Fenton, Jr., Sergeant 
***David W. Scribner, Sergeant 



***William J. Durkin, Jr. 
'***Norman L. Roche 
***Robert A. Bartlett 
***John V. Gregory 
***Robert S. Rhodes 
***Robert P. MacLeod 
***Bernard W. Harrison 
***William N. Hayes 
***Joseph P. Sansone 



Franklin H. Charter 

Ray L. Harris 

William S. Kendall, Jr. 

James P. Conheeney, Jr. 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy 

Allen H. Nelson 

Robert P. Beaudoin 

John E. MacLeod 

Kenneth E. Jewell 

Carl W. Flint 



KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 
Edward J. Collins, Jr. 



140 



Term 
Expires 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION AGENT 
Theron A. Lowden 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
John F. McLaughlin 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Robert F. Cuba 

PUBLIC WEIGHERS 



Charles F. Greenough 
Harold E. Whitney 
Ernest C. Greenough 

Paul M. 



Robert M. Greenough 
Arthur P. Genetti 
Alan C. Wagner 
Wagner, Jr. 



TOWN COUNSEL 
Herbert P. Wilkins 

TOWN ENGINEER 
(vacancy) 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Kenneth E. Jewell 

•EPUTY BUILDING INSPECTOR 
H. Stuart MacGregor 

ARCHIVES COMMITTEE 



David L. May 
^T. Frederick S. Kennedy 
Joyce C. Woodhead 



TOWN REPORT COMMITTEE 



Beverly W. Lydiard 
Gillette H. Noble 
Lynn C. Aldrich 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



Clyde J. Home 
*Donald L. Loring 
**David L. Anderson 
Lyman H. Goff, Jr. 
'"Wilbur J. Tolman 
**John L. Maes 
William H. Kemp 



1967 
1968 
1969 



1967 
1968 
1969 



1967 
1967 

1968 
1968 

1969 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 



''■"Paul M. MacPherson 
**Thomas J. Litle 
Richard J. O'Neil 
Frederick H. Bubier 
William P. McDonald 
Ralph C. Morse 
Frederick M. Haynes 
Stephen E. Lord 
Edward W. Flannery 
Allen M. Christofferson 



PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 



*Joseph S. Cobb 
'■""Robert E. Sweeney 

* Frank L. Arms 
**Richard L. Hodgman 



1967 

1967 
1968 
1968 
1969 
1969 
1970 
1970 
1971 



1967 



1968 



*Resigned 



'Replacing'" 



I 



Term 
Expires 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE (cont'd.) 



Arnold H. Mercier 
'"Norman Mcintosh 
"*Frank H. Weatherby 



PUBLIC CEREMONIES AND 
CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 



Russell Hayward 

Raymond A. Shamel 
'''Seymour A. DiMare 
'""'Clark C. McElvein 

Edward C. Warren 

Carl A. Hedin 
4 Percival W. Wood 



•J >■< 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



John A. Jeffries, Jr. 
William L. Kingman 
Richard H. Murphy 
Robert J. Ellis 
Chauncey W. Waldron, 
Samuel Sutcliffe 
Alice H. May 



Jr. 



1969 
1970 



1967 
1967 
1968 

1968 
1969 
1969 



1967 
1967 
1967 
1968 
1968 
1969 
1969 



STREET LIGHTING COMMITTEE 

Booth D. Jackson Joseph F. Bushell 

Leslie F. Parke 

TOWN EMPLOYEES INSURANCE 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



David W. Scribner 
Stewart Kennedy 



Carolyn Douglas 



Arno H. Perkins 
Viola M. Foley 



TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
Philip G. Watts Allen G. Moody 

BYLAW COMPILATION COMMITTEE 



Joan R. Gates 
Minetta D. Lee 
Gladys S. Wootton 



Lillian C. Hoey 

Carole S. Hill 

Edith D. Stowell 



WATER RESOURCES COMMITTEE 



J. Huston Westover 
Edwin H. Christofferson 
Charles D. O'Neal, Jr. 



T. Frederick S. Kennedy 

''■'Hubert R. Durling, Jr. 

William J. Phillips 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION 



Howard P. Hardin 
Julian J. D'Agostine, Jr. 
Robert H. Nylander 



Marion P. Hartshorn 
Mary M. Maes 
William C. Sawyer 



Perry C. Smith 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY HOUSING FOR THE AGED 

John E. Dunphy, Jr. Agnes E. Johnson 

Edward J. Bursaw Eileen F. Hale 

Patience H. MacPherson 

WALDEN DISTRICT WATER SAFETY COUNCIL 
William J. Phillips Anna Riberio 

ALTERNATE 
Lydia R. Lesure 



141 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY MODERATOR 
COMMITTEE ON TOWN ADMINISTRATION 



''Charles D. MacPherson 
''Chester H. Moody 
^'Walter B. Gates 



Beatrice C. Perkins 

Charles C. Grandy 

Clyde J. Home 



SIDEWALK STUDY COMMITTEE 



Margaret M. Coughlan 
John E. Dunphy, Jr. 



Irene M. Rhodes 
Francis J. Schell 



OTHER APPOINTMENTS 



SEWERAGE STUDY COMMITTEE 



Paul R. Nyquist 
•'Robert J. Ellis 
''K. Gordon Platine 



'■'Hubert R. Durling, Jr. 

*James S. Winston 

**Robert H. Gerhardt 



Edward N. Patrick 



TOWN BUILDING -LAND ACQUISITION COMMITTEE 

Dana B. Hinckley Edward W. Jones 

Alexander A. Morrissette 

VETERANS MEMORIAL STUDY COMMITTEE 

Norman R. Gilbert Arthur C. Sims 

Myron M. Hnatio 

REGIONAL REFUSE DISPOSAL 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Paul R. Nyquist Edward N. Patrick 

-■'Hubert R. Durling, Jr. 



*Resigned -- **Replacing* 



JURY LIST 



PRECINCT 1 

Robert E. Clapp, 4 Wheeler Lane, Salesman 

Paul C. Grosse, 11 Alcott Street, Electronic Engineer 

Franklin D. Moore, 3 Thoreau Road, Airline Pilot 

John W. Putnam, 352 Pope Road, Research Executive 

Richard W. Coburn, 852 Main Street, Retired 

Paul W. Greenough, 36 Newtown Road, Cost Accountant 

Albert W. Koch, 82 Alcott Street, Audiologist 

Aldo R. Miccioli, 6 Hawthorne Street, Electrical Engineer 

Charles E. Miller, Jr., 29 Minuteman Road, Machinist 

David W. Sigourney, 242 Great Road, Engineer 

Leonard Werst, 3 Whittier Drive, Elect. Engineer 

Edward L. York, 8 Green Wood Lane, Manager 

Arthur C. Arms, 4 Thoreau Road, Research Engineer 

John E. Barry, 8 Coughlin Street, Manufacturer 

Robert J. Brandon, 9 Flagg Road, Administrative Assistant 

Robert L. Caldwell, 5 Cross Street, Sales Engineer 

James M. Cook, 57 Hammond Street, Retired 

David S. Dayton, 4 Emerson Drive, Electrical Engineer 

Peter H. Flagg, 121 Great Road, Retailer 

Charles F. Greenough, 54 Brook Street, Foreman 

Wendell T. Hess, 49 Wood Lane, Metallurgical Engineer 

James H. Huff, 12 Green Wood Lane, Ordinance Specialist 

Richard C. Jamieson, 12 Bromfield Road, Systems Analyst 

Donald J. MacLennan, 97 Concord Road, Mechanical Engineer 

T. Leo McCarthy, 457 Great Road, Retired 

Harry B. Morse, 27 Minot Avenue, Adm. 

John M. O'Boyle, 51 Concord Road, Travel Agent 

Dale R. Pierson, 11 Evergreen Road, Chemist 

Edward G. Schwarm, 5 Alcott Street, Electrical Engineer 

Edward F. Troy, 7 Jefferson Drive, Product Manager 

George E. Waitt, 16 Henley Road, Paper Maker 

Francis A. Walsh, 7 Flagg Road, Supervisor 

Frank H. Weatherby, 272 Great Road, Bank Teller 

David A. Wells, 21 Henley Road, Engineer 



142 



PRECINCT 2 

Bruce D. Smith, 6 Ashwood Road, Engineer 

J. Edward Sibel, 266 High Street, Office Manager 

George Pederson, 16 Maple Street, Floor Installation 

Carl F. Beyer, 27 Oakwood Road, Technician 

Richard A. Lowden, 172 Main Street, Truck Driver 

Roger M. Huebsch, 16 Tuttle Drive, Dairy Manager 

Richard C. Janson, 21 Oakwood Road, Sales Representative 

William F. McMahon, 14 Central Street, Chauffeur 

Peter C. Mutty, 5 Pinewood Road, Engineer 

Rollen Redmond, 208 Parker Street, Manager 

Harry M. Bedigan, 87 Liberty Street, Social Worker 

John A. Bellamy, 30 Faulkner Hill Road, Treasurer 

Edward W. Berriman, 17 Independence Road, Treasurer 

Richard E. Blake, 37 Central Street, Technical Writer 

Richard A. Bodge, 4 Piper Lane, Librarian 

Harold W. Cobb, 30 Conant Street, Physicist 

John H. Costello, 21 Main Street, Scientific Aide 

John R. Ehrenfeld, 13 Brucewood Road, Chemical Engineer 

Robert J. Ellis, 10 Country Club Road, Engineer Management 

Harry W. Fagerquist, Jr., 8 Beverly Road, Advertising 

Frank G. Gilfeather, Jr., 7 Ashwood Road, Mechanical Engineer 

Herschel N. Hadley, 45 Martin Street, Math Statistician 

Marian E.H. Houghton, 266 School Street, Home 

Nina E. McLaren, 203 Main Street, Industrial Registered Nurse 

Frederick C. Morse, 11 Faulkner Hill Road, Contract - Admin. 

Marshall R. Myers, 9 Merriam Lane, Truck Driver 

Lionel Nadeau, 5 Old Colony Lane, Contract Specialist 

William E. Penniman, 42 Laws Brook Road, Production Control 

Hubert C. Perry, 96 Hosmer Street, General Radio 

Arthur E. Pruneau, 15 Chadwick Street, Engineer 

Alfred P. Ramos, 51 Main Street, Designer 

Thornton C. Schoch, 6 Doris Road, Budget Manager 

Adril C. Spann, 81 Main Street, Elec. Engr. 

Norman R. Veenstra, 22 High Street, Salesman 

PRECINCT 3 

John E. Dunphy, Jr., 3 Algonquin Road, Engineer 

AhtiE. Autio, 5 Joseph Reed Lane, Tech. Staff 

Clarence W. Benson, 315 Arlington Street, Salesman 

Edward M. Cady, 17 Nash Road, Finisher 

Edward A. Chambers, 3 Cherry Ridge Road, Engineer 

Albert C. Conrod, 102 Willow Street, Physicist 

Robert A. North, 84 Willow Street, Engineer 

Victor G. Pappas, 7 Betsy Ross Circle, Personnel 

Ralph K. Peterson, 11 Orchard Drive, Laboratory Technician 

Everett R. Proud, 8 Ethan Allen Drive, Engineer 

Paul I. Richardson, 103 Central Street, Custodian 

Richard M. Sawdo, 129 Willow Street, Research Staff 

Frank H. Tobin, Jr., 18 Juniper Ridge Road, Engineer 

Robert J. Trocki, 9 Spencer Road, Pharmacist 

Robert I. Durand, 138 Central Street, Machinist 

William D. Garland, 44 Flint Road, Accountant 

Paul F. Gibson, 30 Ethan Allen Drive, Engineering Manager 

Robert F. Guba, 3 76 Central Street, Test Engineer 

Kenneth R. Hardy, 132 Central Street, Atmospheric Physicist 

Mabel J. Jenks, 2 Joseph Reed Lane, Home & Asst. Treasurer 

William T. Kennaugh, 14 Agawam Road, Bank Clerk 

Ernest S. Kennedy, 174 Arlington Street, Truck Driver 

John E. McBreen, Jr., 4 Downey Road, Laborer 

Timothy McCrudden, 32 Elm Street, Computer Analyst 

Theodore M. Quist, 10 Cherry Ridge Road, Staff Member 

MarvynE. Siegal, 2 Black Horse Drive, Eng. Manager 

Ira D. Smith, 28 Agawam Road, Electronics Engineer 

Mary H. Smith, 97 Hayward Road, Home 

Stanley G. Sofka, 6 Elm Court, Maintenance Man 

Harold W. Storrs, 296 Central Street, Design Engineer 

Stanley R. Veasie, 253 Arlington Street, Machinist 

John G. von Jess, 100 Arlington Street, Systems Engineer 

Donald E. Westcott, 75 Charter Road, Food Technologist 

Francis J. Widmayer, 11 Duggan Road, Materials Manager 



143 



INDEX 



Page 

Accountant 109 

Animal Inspector 64 

Appeals, Board of 25 

Appointments 139 

Archives Committee 66 

Assessors 126 

Births 71 

Building Committee 25 

Building Inspector 27 

Cemetery Commission 66 

Civil Defense 15 

Collector 127 

Conservation Commission 5 

Conservation Map (See Center Fold) 

Dog Licenses 74 

Dog Officer 74 

Election 75 

Elizabeth White Fund 24 

Engineering Department 22 

Finance Committee (See Warrant Supplement) 

Fire Department 17 

Goodnow Fund 63 

Health, Board of 29 

Industrial Development Commission 70 

Insect Pest Control 66 

Insurance Committee 70 

Jury List 142 

Land Acquisition Committee 26 

Library Reports 59 

Officers 139 

Personnel Board , 13 

Planning Board 23 

Police Department 14 

Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee 61 

Recreation Commission 60 

Regional Refuse Disposal 64 

School Report 36 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 28 

Selectmen 12 

Sewerage Study Committee 35, 88 

Sidewalk Study Committee 22 

Street Light Committee 22 

Streets, Superintendent of 19 

Town Administration Study Committee 65 

Town Employees Insurance Advisory Conamittee 76 

Town Forest Committee 65 

Town Meeting Proceedings: 

March 14, 1966 77 

June 6, 1966 87 

December 5, 1966 99 

Treasurer's Report 129 

Tree Warden 66 

Veterans Agent 69 

Veterans' Graves Officer 67 

Veterans' Memorial Study Committee 68 

Water District Study Committee 77 

Welfare Board 34 

Wires Inspector 28 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 69 



144 



POLICE EMERGENCY 263-2911 

FIRE EMERGENCY 263-4321 

(Emergency Only) 

BE SURE TO GIVE YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS AS WELL AS THE NATURE OF YOUR EMERGENCY CLEARLY. 
DO NOT HANG UP UNTIL YOU ARE SURE THAT YOUR MESSAGE HAS BEEN UNDERSTOOD. 

Town Office - Call 263-2761 



FOR ANSWERS ON: 

Assessments 

Bills and Accounts, Taxes 

Birth, Death, Marriage Certificates 

Building 

Cemeteries 

Dog, Hunting, and Fishing Licenses 

Dog Problems 

Education Information 

Elections, Voting, and Registration 

Engineering 

Fire (routine) 

Garbage and Refuse, Health and Sanitation 

Highways and Streets 

Industrial Development 

Libi-ai-y 

Licenses 

Nurse (School) 

Nurse (Town) 

Oil Burner Permits 

Permits for Burning 

Plumbing Permits 

Recreation 

Schools: 



Veterans' Services 
Water Problems 
Welfare Questions 
Zoning 

Electrical Wiring 
Electrical Wiring Permits 



CALL THE 



TELEPHONE 



Board of Assessors 263-5012 

Treasurer and Collector 263-7018 

Town Clerk's Office 263-2761 

Building Inspector 263-7545 

Cemetery Superintendent 263-2240 or 263-4428 

Town Clerk's Office 263-2761 

Dog Officer 263-4342 

School Superintendent 263-5737 

Town Clerk's Office 263-2761 

Town Engineer's Office 263-7545 

Fire Department 263-4366 

Board of Health 263-4736 

Highway Department 263-5332 

Industrial Development Commission 263-4691 

Librarian 263-2232 

Selectmen or 263-2761 

Board of Health 263-4736 

School Nurse 263-7738 

Town Nurse. . 263-4736 

Fire Chief 263-4366 

Fire Department 263-4366 

Board of Health 263-4736 

Recreation Commission 263-7257 

Elm Street 263-2753 

Julia McCarthy 263-4982 

Marion L. Towne 263-2042 

Florence Merriam 263-2581 

Acton -Boxborough Regional Junior High 263-7716 

Acton -Boxborough Regional Senior High 263-7738 

Veterans' Agent 263-4757 

Water District (not part of Town of Acton) 263-5646 

Welfare Board (Office in Bedford - Call Collect) . . . 275-6668 

Selectmen 263-2761 

Wire Inspector 263-5555 

Office - 69 Haj^ard Road 263-4736 



MEETINGS 

Annual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Appeals Board 
Assessors 
Building Committee 
Conservation Commission 
Finance Committee 

Health Board 

Industrial Development Commission 

Library Trustees 

Planning Board 

Recreation Commission 

School Committee: 

Regional 

Local 
Selectmen 



DAY & TIME 

1st Monday in March 

2nd Monday in March 

Meet when necessary 

IstTues. ea. month, 9 a.m. 

1st and 3rd Wed. ea. month, 7:30 p.m. 

1st and 3rd Wed. ea. month, 8:00 p.m. 

Oct. thru Feb., Thurs. at 8p.m. 

Rest of year, Thurs. on call 
2nd and 4th Mon. ea. month, 7:45 p.m. 
1st Wed. ea. month, 8p.m.. 
1st Thurs. ea. month, 8p.m. 
2nd and 4t,h Mon. ea. month, 7:30p.m. 
2nd Tues. ea. month, 7:30 p.m. 

2nd Mon. ea. month, 7:30 p.m. 
3rd Mon. ea. month, 7:30p.m. 
Every Tues. at 7 p.m. 



PLACE 

Precinct Fire Stations 

Blanchard Auditorium 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Office at 69 Hayward Rd. 

Center Fire Station 

South Acton Fire Station 

Office at 69 Hayward Rd. 
Town Hall 
Memoi'ial Library 
Office at 69 Hayward f: 
Town Hall 

Libi-ary, ABRHS 

School Corn m. Rm. ABRHS 

Town Hall 



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OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Incorporated as a Town: July 3, 173 5 

Type of Government: Town Meeting-Selectmen 

Location: Eastern Massachusetts, Middlesex i.,ouniy, Doraerea on 

the east by Carlisle and Concord, on the west by Box- 
borough, on the north by Westford and Littleton, on the 
south by Sudbury, and on the southwest by Stow and 
Maynard. 



Name: . 



Acton as the name of our Town has several possible 
derivations: the old Saxon word Ac -tun meaning oak 
settlement or hamlet in the oaks, the Town of Acton, 
England, the Acton family of England, a member of 
which supposedly offered a bell for the first meeting 
house in 1735. 



Elevation at Town Hall: 268' above mean sea level. 

Land Area: Approximately 20 square miles. 

Population: Yea r Persons 

2136 
3510 
4681 
7238 
10188 



Density 

106 per sq. mi. 

175 
233 
361 

507 



Climate: 



Public Education: 



Normal January temperature 27.7°F. 
Normal July temperature 72.0°F. 

Normal annual precipitation 43.02 inches. 

Pupil enrollment (October 1967): 

Grades 1-6, 2106; Grades 7-12, 1620 (Regional) 
Number of teachers and administrative staff: 203 
Pupil-teacher ratio: 1 to 30 (avg. elementary grades) 
1 to 18 (avg. Jr. and Sr. High) 



Tax Picture: Year Tax Rate Assessed Valuation 

$14, 168, 525 
15, 799, 455 

17, 207, 395 

18, 408, 058 
70, 309, 795 
74,262,745 

United States Senators in Congress: Edward W. Brooke (R), Newton, Massachusetts 

Edward M. Kennedy (D), Boston, Massachusetts 
Representative in Congress, 3rd Congressional Dist: . . . Philip J. Philbin (D), Clinton, Massachusetts 
State Senator, Middlesex and Worcester District: .... William I. Randall, Framingham, Massachusetts 
Representative, General Court, 13th Middlesex Dist: . . John A. S. McGlennon, Concord, Massachusetts 
Governor's Council, 3rd District: George F. Cronin, Jr., Boston, Massachup»++'^ 



Year 


Tax Rate 


1962 


$82 


1963 


83 


1964 


86 


1965 


92 


1966 


2 9 


1967 


31 



OFFICE HOURS 



Town Office (Selectmen, Clerk) 

Treasurer and Collector 

Assessors 

School Superintendent 

Board of Health 

Vetei-ans' Agent 

Library Hours: 

Memorial Library 

Citizens, W. Acton 



8-4:30 (Tues. 7:30p.m.) 

8-4:30 (Tues. 7:30-8:30p.m.) 

8-4:30 (Tues. 7:30-8:30 p.m.) 

8-4:30 

8-4:30 

No Regular Hours 

Mon. -Fri., 9 a.m. -9p.m. 
Saturday, 10-6 p.m. 
Mon., 7-9 p.m., Tues., 3-6 p.m. 
Thurs., 3 -5 p.m. 



Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

A-B Regional H. S. 

Office at 69 Havward Rd. 



263-2761 
263-70r 
263-501- 
263-5737 
263-4736 
263-4757 

263-2232 



ANNUAL REPORTS 




TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR ITS 

TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SECOND 

MUNICIPAL YEAR 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER THIRTY-FIRST 



^967 



RECREATION 



1967 saw the fourth consecutive increase in attendance and interest in the Acton playgrounds. A total 
aggregate of 15,551 children were involved in the various activities offered by the Recreation Commission 
under the guidance of Mr. Robert Evans and his staff. 

There was an average of 2 children per day per playground increase over 1966. In the tennis pro- 
gram there was an average increase of 13 children per day over 1966. We are pleased with the increases 
and we feel that the expanded facilities and equipment which the town has voted to purchase has been a very 
important factor in our growth as has the outstanding leadership and enthusiasm of Mr. Evans and his staff. 

On the last day of the program the playground Olympics were held at the Charter Road football field 
and track. The use of these facilities was greatly appreciated by the Recreation Commission and we hope 
that we will be able to use them again. On that evening we had 350 children competing for the ribbons and ice 
cream sundaes, the prizes for their efforts. 

In our bowling program the children were able to bowl at a reduced rate besides receiving free instruc- 
tion and use of bowling shoes. There was an average of 106 youngsters at each session which amazed both the 
Recreation staff and the proprietors of the Acton Bowladrome. 

The practice of visiting other towns and competing in baseball and tennis was continued. The Bedford 
Summer Theater performed at the ABRHS auditorium. Three family nights were held which again were 
extremely well attended and enjoyed by all. 

The Recreation Commission helped subsidize the Men's Twilight Softball League which had ten teams. 
The quality of play improved as well as the interest. This league selected its own Board of Directors which 
runs the league in a very professional way and the men should be lauded for their work. 

Also as in the past years the Men's Twilight Basketball League was active. A new outdoor basketball 
court at the A-B Junior High School was used. The use of this facility was also greatly appreciated by the 
Recreation Commission. 

Not to be outdone. Girls Twi Basketball and Softball also showed an increase in interest. The girls 
played informal games for their enjoyment as well as a few games with teams from nearby towns. 

Mrs. Kennedy, our Arts and Crafts director, completed another successful year. The children eager- 
ly awaited her weekly visits to the playgrounds to tackle their projects. The success and ingenuity of her ideas 
were evidenced by the items that were brought home by the children. 





SPECIAL REPORT OF THE RECREATION COMMISSION 



en 
fenc- 



Tlie policy and primary aims of the Recreation Commission over the past four or five years has be 
to improve the existing playgrounds by (1) purchasing new equipment to offer a variety of activities, (2) fei 
ing in the playgrounds where necessary in order to reduce the chances of children wandering into adjoining 
private property, streets, or bodies of water, and landscaping two of the playgrounds, (3) broadening the 
scope of activities to include more age groups than just the young children originally taken care of. 



'■■' «£ 




iginally 

This phase of our program has been pretty 
well completed. The fencing is completed. The 
playgrounds have about all the equipment we feel 
they should have. We have constructed four doubles 
tennis courts, two on Massachusetts Avenue and two 
on Elm Street, which will be opened this Spring. 



Along with the new tennis courts on Elm 
Street, the Recreation Commission desires to equip 
a new playground adjacent to the tennis courts. If 
the Town Meeting approves these plans by allowing 
us to purchase this equipment we feel that this play- 
ground should potentially be the most popular in town 
because of the location. It would be located near a large residential area which is not the case for some of our 
other playgrounds. We understand that a Softball field is also going to be constructed on this site by the School 
Committee. Therefore, we are hopeful that by the summer there will be a recreational facility at this location 
that the town will be very proud of. It is also the intention of the Recreation Commission to hire another tennis 
instructor at Elm Street so that other children may have the opportunity of receiving instruction in this fine 
sport. 

The second school on the Elm Street property 
is well underway and we understand substantial play- 
fields are included in the construction plans. These 
areas along with planned areas mentioned above should 
comprise an outstanding Educational and Recreational 
complex. This connplex should relieve soine of the 
limited facilities that we have in Acton. 

In May 1967, a planning committee was formed. 
Their objective was to evaluate the needs of the town 
and to formulate a long range plan, to be completed by 
July 1968. Ill health and personal business commit- 
ments of the members has delayed some of the project 
work to be done. Even with these problems a great 
deal has been accomplished. The long range planning 
group did bring many of the immediate needs and prob- 
lems into focus which will be discussed. To help solve 
some of the problems, individuals and groups will be 
asked to help in many project areas. 

As mentioned, the proposed Elm Street plajy- 
ground will relieve a need by having it near a center 
of population. There are two other areas of Acton 
that also rate a playground in a hurry. They are the 
Flagg Hill area and the High Street, Parker Street 
area in South Acton. These areas both have housing 
developments with a substantial number of children. 
The Recreation Commission is not in the land buying 
business because with school land acquisitions and 
available town land there is adequate land to expand 
our facilities in an orderly manner. The exception 
to this policy is in the areas mentioned. We have 

looked into some pieces of land but they were not for sale nor suited to our needs because of 
ability. If suitable playground sites are found and are for sale at a realistic price the Recre 
■will ask the voters of Acton to purchase land in these areas. 




location or access- 
ation Commission 



The voters in the Town of Acton saw fit to support the. Recreation Commission by hiring a Recreation 
Director for the summertime. We have had only one director and that has been Mr. Robert Evans, with whom 
we have been exceptionally pleased. This man has a great deal of enthusiasm, imagination and initiative. 
Primarily because of his qualities the program has expanded in the various directions previously mentioned. 
We feel that the town may be approaching the time when it should have a full time Recreation Director. The 
director could organize a winter program for both adults and youngsters which could include basketball, volley- 
ball, physical exercise activities, skiing, skating, and golden age activities. Obviously to conduct some of the 



above mentioned activities, school facilities will have to be made available on off hours. There is not any 
reason to believe that an acceptable arrangement could not be made with the school committee, who we are 
sure would like to see maximum return from their investment. 




The Town Meeting of 1967 authorized the Recreation Commission to make a plan for the development 
of the Town Forest adjacent to Route 2. The Long Range Planning Committee spent a great deal of time and 
effort studying the Town Forest. This is one of the most beautiful wooded areas anyone could hope to enjoy. 
This area will make an outstanding camping, hiking and picnicking area. There is a road already in the 
forest. The only problem involved with this forest and a major one at that, is how to get into it. At this time 
the town engineer has been asked to recommend to us what would be the best route for a road into the area. 
The only way to get in there would be from Bulette Road. The ideal and cheapest way to get into it would be 
from Route 2 but the State Department of Public Works would not allow this for good reason. 

A survey was held to determine what the citizens desire in recreational facilities and programs. The 
survey was conducted by PRIDE whose Chairman is James Walline. This group spent a great deal of effort 
in the survey and unfortunately received a 16% return. Even with the small return, the results will be of 
assistance to the Recreation Commission in formulating future programs. The questionnaire was divided into 
two sections by asking children and adults to state their answers separately. In the childrens section the order 
of preference was: 



1 . Swimming 

2 . Hockey - Skating 

3. Playgrounds 

4. Skiing 

5. Sledding- Tobogganing 

6. Horseback Riding 

7. Baseball - Softball 

8. Biking 

9. Library Story Telling 



10. Tennis 

11. Camping 

12. Fishing 

13. Arts & Crafts 

14. Gymnastics - Physical Education 

15. Boating 

16. Picnicking 

17. Bowling 

18. Hiking 



The above 18 activities all received substantial scores. In summary, the results show a desire on the 
part of the youngsters for the Recreation Commission to continue and expand its summer playground programs, 
to be able to use the town owned forests and woodlands because of the interest shown in picnicking, hiking, 
camping and horseback riding. The interest shown in winter events such as skating, skiing, and sledding is 
an area where the Recreation Commission has had nothing to offer. A start will be attempted next year by the 
construction of an outdoor skating facility that will be relatively easy to maintain. The pond at Charter Road 
has been a problem to clear of snow because of the large volume of water flowing through there. It never 
freezes on either end and therefore Mr. Nelson of the Highway Department is hesitant to clear it for fear of 
losing a piece of equipment in the pond. Last but not least, swimming still is the activity most wanted and 
this will be covered in another section. 

In the adult section the order of preference was: 



1. 


Swimming 


2. 


Adult Education 


3. 


Skiing 


4. 


Skating 


5. 


Tennis 


6. 


Golf 


7. 


Boating 


8. 


Theater 


9. 


Physical Exercise 



10. 


Horseback Riding 


11. 


Arts & Crafts 


12. 


Concerts 


13. 


Bowling 


14. 


Sledding- Tobogganing 


15. 


Hiking 


16. 


Biking 


17. 


Picnicking 



The above 17 activities received substantial scores; also swimming was by far the most popular activ- 
ity desired. After number one the results seem to show a greater degree of variety. The adults would also 
like to see the town woodlands used. Skating was also of high priority and as mentioned earlier, it is hoped 
that a proposed skating area will alleviate this situation. The high rating of tennis was not surprising and 
the opening of our new courts on Elm Street this year should give the town adequate facilities for at least the 
time being. 

The need for a swimming facility has become increasingly important. The recent PRIDE Survey 
clearly indicates, as did the League of Women Voters survey six years ago, that the lack of a swimming facil- 
ity is the Recreation Commission's number one problem. This particular problem has existed for more than 
ten years, but has become more critical due to the closing of Walden Pond. 

The Recreation Commission recognizes that ninety percent of Acton's citizens do not belong to the 
private neighborhood pools and must go outside of Acton to fulfill their swimming needs. 

Ideally, the town would like to have both indoor and outdoor swimming facilities for public use. 

There are several alternatives to solve this problem - 

- construct a man made dug out type pond 

- construct a seasonal municipal pool 

- construct an indoor facility for year round use as part of a new 
junior or senior high school or Y. M. C. A. 

Much talk about the feasibility of a dug out man-made pond at Elm Street has taken place. Previous 
preliminary tests by the Soil Conservation Service and the Board of Health indicate this area could be suitable 
for such a facility. If more extensive test this summer indicate this property's not suitable for a swimming 
facility, the Commission will abandon the idea of a man-made pond at Elm Street. 

The proposed pond would help alleviate our immediate need, but its size limitation may necessitate an 
additional facility in the future. It will be necessary to provide room for three percent of the town populace to 
swim at one time. 

A mimicipal pool might be the answer to the problem. Many cities and towns have pool complexes of a 
main 75' x 100' pool, with an adjacent wading pool. A land area of approximately three acres could include the 
pool complex, parking area, and locker room facilities. Also to be considered is an additional acre for play 
fields and/or picnicking, or for overflow parking at peak periods. 

The time has come to set aside procrastination and alleviate the problem now. We should not force 
this problem on the schools and wait five more years, only to face the same problem again. An indoor pool 
at the regional school will cost the taxpayers more dollars than an outdoor summer facility and they would get 
less dollar return in actual personal use. 

Without basic swimming proficiency, Actonians cannot take part in such activities as competitive swim- 
ming, boating, sailing, fishing, waterskiing and skin and scuba diving. The Recreation Commission needs your 
support in providing a swimming facility. Won't you help? 

According to the National Recreation and Parks Association standards, a city or town should spend $6.00 
per capita annually for recreation and park facilities, and an average of $1.50 per capita in salaries and wages. 

In 1967 the town spent $1.60 per capita on facilities, the major portion going to the construction of the 
new tennis courts and $.48 per capita in salaries and program. In 1968 we will spend $.70 per capita for equip- 
ment and $.60 per capita for salaries and program. With this small per capita spending much new equipment 
has been purchased and many facilities improved. 

The Recreation Commission, as mentioned earlier, has made great progress with the support of the 
voters of Acton over the past few years. With the help of the Long Range Planning Committee some of the 
immediate needs have been brought into focus. With the continued support of the voters we should be able to 
solve some of these problems in the very near future. 

Charles W. Pappas, Chairman 
David Michael 
Margaret Coughlan 
Gale Jarvis 

Recreation Commission 



SELECTMEN 



The Board of Selectmen organized for the coming'year on March 7, 1967, by the election of Mrs. Mary 
K. Hadley as Chairman, William C. Sawyer as Clerk, and John H. Loring as third member. Mr. Sawyer 
succeeded Warren F. Birch who served devotedly for one term. 

The Board met an average of two or more times a week during the past year, supplementing its weekly 
regular meeting with special meetings, hearings, and joint conferences as they became necessary. One of the 
recurring problems of the Town is the coordination of the activities of forty or more Boards, Committees, 
Commissions, Departments, and Officers. A considerable number of the Selectmen's meetings in 1967 were 
joint meetings with one or more groups or their representatives intended to provide a needed exchange of infor- 
mation and coordination of activity. 

A large portion of the Board's time was used to find and employ people to fill three of the town's most 
important governmental posts, those of Town Engineer, Fire Chief, and Administrative Assistant. Anthony L. 
Galeota, Jr., was appointed Town Engineer in July and by his diligence and ability, has proven well worth the 
nearly two years of careful search taken to find him. In September Thomas J. Barry, Jr., was appointed by 
the Selectmen as assistant to Fire Chief MacGregor, to succeed him as Fire Chief upon his retirement on 
November 30. Mr. Barry was the unanimous first choice of the Selection Committee appointed by the Select- 
men to screen the eighteen applicants for the position. Applications were solicited from residents of the town 
and others who met the requirements established by the Selectmen. It will be difficult for anyone to fill the 
post of Fire Chief as well as has Chief MacGregor during the past thirty- four years, but the Board believes 
that Chief Barry will do an excellent job. 

Early in 1968, Robert W. Dotson was appointed to the post of Administrative Assistant. The Board 
believes that this position is too important to fill hastily or with a person who does not have the necessary 
qualifications. Mr. Dotson was chosen from forty-one applicants, twenty-nine of whom the Board interviewed 
personally. It is our opinion that Mr. Dotson's background in Social Sciences and his demonstrated ability to 
successfully develop public services should prove of value to the town. 

Seldom does a Board of Selectmen have the opportunity in a single year to fill three positions of such 
far reaching importance to our town. It is difficult to overestimate how necessary it was that those posts be 
filled with people who are adequate to the increasingly challenging problems that will confront our town for 
years to come. 

It became apparent early in the year that a re-evaluation of all positions in the personnel classifications 
plan was imperative and later in the year that the Personnel Board could not complete the job without the assist- 
ance of a consultant. Consequently, after the November Town Meeting appropriated funds for the purpose, the 
firm of Charles M. Evans & Associates was employed. This firm has presented its report to the Personnel 
Board who will submit it to the Annual Town Meeting for approval. It is hoped that the amendments to the Per- 
sonnel Bylaw proposed by this report will be adopted so that the morale of town employees may be improved 
and their more efficient management secured. 

The Town will vote in March on the Selectmen-Manager form of government for the third time. The 
Board continues to enthusiastically support this proposition. The all important communication among commit- 
tees that are planning Acton's future continues to be inadequate. With relief from the administrative detail, 
the Board of Selectmen could perform better their co-ordinating function. 

As usual, some needs are not fulfilled within the year and project into the next. Still to be resolved is 
the acquisition of land and housing for the various town departments, the development of a natural resources 
plan for wise management in the use of land and water, the effect of the proposed regionalization of schools on 
the Town's political structure, and what measures remain to be adopted to broaden the tax base and strengthen 
the economic life of Acton. 

The Board also expended the usual quota of time on its routine work as an arm of the state government. 
This work involves work such as pole hearings, Hatch Act hearings, approval of bills and warrants, answer- 
ing questions and complaints, and a myriad of other details that could not be described here. 

With the staff of the several departments at 69 Hayward Road a procedure has been worked out for the 
daily recording of purchases and charges against the appropriate appropriation. This means greater control 
on the respective department's budget. Furthermore, the procedure will help identify the unexpected and 
emergency obligations. 

The Boston Post Gold Cane was carried by Mrs. Arthur Whitcomb early in 1967 and is now held by 
Mrs. Louise A. Smith, 98, of Estabrook Road. A traditional honor to our elder citizens lives on in the midst 
of change and growth. 

Without the thousands of hours of devoted work donated to the town by those who voluntarily work on its 
boards, committees, and commissions, your town government could not go on. On behalf of the town and its 
citizens we would like to extend their gratitude and appreciation to those hard-working volunteers. 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



The past year has been an active one for the Personnel Board since the accelerated growth of the Town 
of Acton necessarily places additional need for personnel administration to provide the framework and mechan- 
ics of this facet of town government. 

A nurpber of jobs and positions were studied, some added and some upgraded. These studies resulted 
in a decision to request funds from the town for a special overall outside study of wage and salaried positions 
in the town to insure currency and adequacy. This was approved at a .Special Town Meeting and the firm of 
Charles Evans Associates completed the study which was put into article form for the Annual Town Meeting. 

In addition to the above, certain vacation benefits were requested by means of Personnel bylaw amend- 
ment for town employees to bring them in line with other towns and industry. 

L. H. Goff, Chairman 
William Kemp 
David Anderson 
John Tierney 



A WORD OF APPRECIATION 



1967 saw the departure from public life of five of Acton's municipal employees, and they will be greatly 
missed. 

H. S. MacGregor, Chief of the Acton Fire Department for 34 years and intimately connected with the 
Department for most of his life, retired November 30 amidst expressions of regret from every part of town. 
Mrs. Marian Piper retired October 31 from her position as Head Librarian of the Acton Memorial Library, 
a position she held for 11 years, during which time library circulation tripled and the handsome new library 
addition was built. Mrs. Violet Foley retired December 2 9 from 10 years of clerical work in the Town Hall; 
she had previously served the town as police radio operator for many years. 

Also retiring during the year were Arno H. ("Buster") Perkins from 11 years with the Highway Depart- 
ment and a member of the town Fire Department for 38 years, and Jack Hurley, at one time also a member of 
the Fire Department, who worked 17 years for the Cemetery Department. 

The best wishes of Acton go to these five, with hopes for a long and happy retirement. 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



During the past year, the Acton Civil Defense Agency has maintained its qualifying position for par- 
ticipation in Federal Financial Assistance Programs. Under this program, surplus property having a current 
value of $2,890.00 has been acquired at a cost of $683.59. This material and equipment will be used by the 
Highway Department and other town departments. 

Of the $400.00 appropriated for Civil Defense in 1967, $292.00 has been spent on routine expenses and 
maintenance of communications equipment. $115.00 was spent for a Gonset Communicator and charged against 
Article 5 of the Special Town Meeting of June 24, 1967. $2285.00 remains in unexpended articles for Civil 
Defense use; $448.45 of unexpended appropriations was returned to the General Fund. 

Two locations for community fallout ghelters were reported by the Corps of Engineers. They are the 
Woodlawn Memorial Chapel Basement and the Julia McCarthy Elementary School Basement. The Blanchard 
Auditorium Basement has been disqualified as a fallout shelter because of an inadequate protection factor. 

John F. McLaughlin 
Director 



POLICE 



Department Organization 

Chief of Police, two Sergeants, nine Patrolmen, four Specials (part-time) and two Matrons (part-time). 
Officer Robert A. Bartlett resigned to take over a gas station. 

Training of Personnel 

Training of Police Officers consists of six weeks in an accepted Police Academy of the Commonwealth. 
Training must be completed within the first six months of police service. 

Our Safety Officer obtains pertinent information through the Massachusetts Safety Officers League. 

Our Juvenile Officer receives training and information pertaining to juveniles through the Massachusetts 
Juvenile Officers Association. 

In 1967 our Juvenile Officer attended a ten week course for the prevention and control of Juvenile Delin- 
quency. 

The use of firearms is taught at the designated Police Academy and is practiced on our own range at 
the Police Station throughout the year. 



Law. 
Arrests 



In 1967 Sergeant Chauncey R. Fenton, Jr., attended Northeastern University for a course on Criminal 

Services Rendered (continued) 



Physical Arrests 

Male 

Female 

Juvenile 

Causes of Arrests 

Crimes Against the Person 
Crimes Against Property 
Crimes Against Public Order 
Total 

Services Rendered 

Complaints Investigated 

Licenses: 

Bicycles Registered 
Liquor I. D. Cards 
Revolver Permits 
To Sell Firearms 



Cruiser Responses 



47 

45 

2 

25 



14 

1 
32 

47 



192 

146 

4 

96 

±. 

250 

3, 693 



Cruiser Ambulance Trips: 
Acton Medical Center 
Emerson Hospital 
Metropolitan State Hospital 



Persons: 

Motorists Assisted 
Resuscitator Used 

Property: 

Doors Found Unlocked in Buildings 

and Places of Business 
House Checks 
Fire Alarms Answered 



Notifications: 
Calls to DPW 
Edison, Street Lights Out and 

Wires Down 
Summonses Served 
Summonses Sent Out of Town 

Grand Total 



Traffic Control 



1966 1967 



Total Number of Accidents 2 30 

Reported to Department 
Parking Violations 

Motor Vehicle Violations Prosecuted 



16 



174 



24 



259 



Violations Reported to Registry of 
Motor Vehicles: 

Court Action 
Warnings 

Total Citations Issued 



30 

179 

8. 

217 



55 
16 



76 
454 

95 
635 



27 

135 

776 

242 

1, 180 

6, 310 



259 
143 

402 



Community Relations 

Again this year our station has been an Open House for many civic groups. 

This year we worked more closely with children and their parents in relation to any problems that 
could develop into serious situations. In 1968 a greater effort will be made to educate parents and their chil- 
dren to the dangers of narcotics and specifically the danger and pitfalls of smoking marijuana. 



Safety Officer 

The Department has one part-time Safety Officer. This year Safety Officer David W. Scribner ran 
several films pertaining to safety at the schools. He spent many hours with the School Departnnent on proper 
locations for school bus stops, etc. 

Juvenile Officer 

Our Juvenile Officer also works on a part-time basis. He is a regular officer of the Department who 
handles this in addition to his regular job. Juvenile Officer Robert S. Rhodes attends monthly Juvenile meet- 
ings and is very active in the Youth Center. 

Juvenile Officer's Activities 

Complaints Investigated 49 Handled within the Department 

and Released 25 

Referred to Juvenile Court 

or Probation Department 24 Total 49 

In closing 1 would like to thank all the members of the Department, and my Secretary who worked with 
me in carrying out the duties of the Police Department during the year and to all others who assisted us I am 
grateful. 

Edward J. Collins, Jr. 
Chief of Police 



FIRE 



I herewith submit the annual report of the Fire Department for the year ending December 31, 1967. 

Total number of alarms responded to are as follows: 

Residential 24 

Non- residential 8 

Miscellaneous 

Grass and Brush 

Automobile and Outside Equipment 

Malicious False Alarms, Smoke Scares, Accidental Alarms 

Accidents and Emergencies 

Mutual Aid 



Loss to Buildings 
Loss to Contents 

Loss to Automobiles 

$122, 514. 96 





3 




74 




21 




18 




187 




12 




347 


$ 55 


001. 91 


66, 


713. 05 




800. 00 



Permits Issued: 



Oil and Power Burners 122 

Blasting 45 

Open Air Fires 1, 608 

Inspections and Investigations 489 

Liquified Petroleum 6 



Collected: 



Permits 
Station Rental 
Miscellaneous 
Testing Water Mains 

$837. 50 



$111. 


00 


510. 


00 


192. 


50 


24. 


00 



On December 1, 1967 I took command of the Fire Department due to the retirement of Chief H. S. 
MacGregor. Chief MacGregor did an outstanding job of organization and management and the Department 
as it is today is a monument to this dedicated man. 

Work completed in 1967 includes repairs to Engine #7 as well as installing a new motor in Engine #5. 
Extensive Fire Alarm work was carried out by Clarence G.- Frost and Malcolm Perkins due to the many 
changeovers of cross arms and alarm boxes made necessary by the installation of new poles by Boston Edi- 
son Company. This work was done at no additional cost to the town. A van type truck was purchased from 
government surplus and converted by the permanent men to use for fire alarm repair. It has proved very 
useful. 

Also the West Station #3 was painted inside by the permanent men. In the area of training the following 
schools were attended by men of both the paid and call departments. 

Central Massachusetts Fire Academy; 

Instructor's Course (2 weeks) - Firefighter M. MacGregor and Firefighter M. Perkins 

Basic Fire Fighting (6 weeks) - Firefighter Wm. H. Soar, Jr. 

Advance Fire Fighting (3 weeks) - Firefighter Clarence G. Frost 

Advance Fire Fighting (nights) - Firefighter C. Sweet, Firefighter D. Copeland, Firefighter Wm. H. 

Soar, Jr., Firefighter E. Belmont, Firefighter M. Perkins, and 

Firefighter H. King 

New Hampshire State Fire School at Meadowwood Drill Yard (2 day course in firefighting) 

Firefighter Wm. H. Soar, Jr., Firefighter D. Huntley, Firefighter P. Harris, Firefighter F. Malson, 
and Auxiliary Firemen Craig and Calkins, Firefighter M. MacGregor also served as an instructor at 
the New Hampshire School and the Fire Academy. 

In 1967 Richard Lowden was appointed Deputy Chief in District #2. 

Program for 1968 

The New England Rating Bureau in their 1965 Survey of Acton recommended that we have full 24-hour 
coverage by paid men. At the present time the paid Firefighters only work from 8:00 A. M. to 4:00 P. M. 
After these hours the department operates on a call basis. The call department does an excellent job but 
they still have to come from their homes to the fire stations to man the apparatus. Also with two men on 
duty in Station 3, the apparatus in that station can be on the road within 45 seconds after the receipt of an 
alarm and many still alarms can be handled by these two men without calling the entire company. To pro- 
vide the 24-hour coverage without sacrificing the present day coverage in Stations 1 and 2, three new fire- 
fighters are needed. It is also desirable three fire Captains be appointed from the paid firefighters. These 
three Captains would work as part of the 2 4 -hour coverage so there would be a direct and continuous line of 
responsibility 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. At the present time the Call-Deputies work during the day on 
weekends to help solve this problem. The funds used for this prograin would more than cover the increase 
in salaries for the three Captains and give us more coverage. 

I would like to thank the firefighters and the Auxiliary for their cooperation and excellent work. I also 
wish, on behalf of Chief MacGregor and myself, to thank the several boards and town departments who have 
helped us this year. 

Thomas J. Barry, Jr. 
Fire Chief 



SIDEWALK COMMITTEE 



The Sidewalk Study Committee met on several occasions in 1967 with town officials in order to obtain 
action on the trunk plan, previously published, for which the town has voted funds of $7,500. 

To date, preliminary stakes have been placed on Main Street from Musket Drive to opposite Taylor Road. 
Layouts are scheduled to be made and specifications prepared this winter for sidewalks there. With an objec- 
tive of conserving esthetic values - particularly avoiding loss of trees - the Committee prefers to seek ease- 
ments when necessary, so that the sidewalks can conform with the topography. 

The Committee continues to stand ready to take any action that will further the sidewalk program. The 
Committee has discussed a set of priorities for additional sidewalks beyond the trunk system. Eight locations 
have been considered. 

Margaret M. Coughlan, Chairman 
Irene M. Rhodes John E. Dunphy, Jr. 

Francis J. Schell Timothy B. Blodgett 



STREETS 



I herewith submit the annual report of the Highway Department for the year 1967. 

Chapter 90 Construction. The 2,000 feet of new way on High Street were completed this year. Seven 
hundred and fifty tons of Type I Bituminous Concrete (top course) were laid in place, the berms placed, and 
the slopes graded and seeded. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance. The following streets were resurfaced with one and one-half inches of Type I 
Bituminous Concrete pavement in one course and a tack coat of emulsion, R. S. I, at the rate of 1/15 gallon 
per square yard. 

Main Street from Maynard line to Pine Street (2,250 feet) 
School Street from Fire Station to Piper Road (1, 175 feet) 
Willow Street from Central Street southerly (2, 465 feet) 

Chapter 81 Maintenance. During the spring and summer a number of streets were scraped, patched, 
swept, and then resurfaced with asphalt and sand. They included the following streets: 

Arlington Street (6190 feet) Martin Street (800 feet) 

Brabrook Road (870 feet) Nash Road (2, 150 feet) 

Bulette Road (1, 040 feet) Newtown Road (11,740 feet) 

Coughlin Street (1, 200 feet) Pearl Street (280 feet) 

Downey Road (350 feet) Pope Road (12,100 feet) 

Flagg Road (800 feet) River Street (1,800 feet) 

Flint Road (1, 350 feet) Robbins Street (650 feet) 

Henley Road (1, 900 feet) Spencer Road (1,120 feet) 

Liberty Street (3, 05 feet)* Stow Street (4,600 feet) 

Lothrop Road (1, 550 feet) Tuttle Drive (1,400 feet) 

Martin Street (2, 100 feet)* Wood Lane (1,990 feet) 

*Mix-in-place 

General Highway. Taylor Road (4,240 feet) and Piper Road (5,016 feet) were resurfaced with mix-in- 
place. Adams Street was regraveled this fall with gravel from the disposal area, and Minot Avenue was 
reshaped with processed gravel. Berms were installed in various parts of the town, most of the road sides 
were mowed, and the majority of the streets were swept. 

Drainage. The various drainage projects in 1967 included the following: 

Concord Road at Minot Avenue: In order to correct a serious' situation where water was backing up 
into homes on Minot Avenue, 168 feet of 48 inch reinforced concrete pipe were installed. In conjunction 
with this, a portion of the proposed new access to Woodlawn Cemetery was filled. 

Central Street at Downey Road: Five structures (catch basins) and 67 feet of 12 inch pipe were 
installed. This area will be seeded in the spring. 

Central Street at Prospect Street: Eight structures, 22 feet of 18 inch pipe, and 348 feet of 12 inch 
pipe were installed. The final landscaping will be done in the spring. 

River Street: One structure and 3 6 feet of 12 in. pipe were installed in the vicinity of 140 River Street. 

Henley Road: In the vicinity of 25 Henley Road one structure and 24 feet of 12 inch pipe and 12 feet 
of six inch perforated pipe were installed. 

Central Street: One structure was installed in the vicinity of 194 Central Street. 

Charter Road: One structure and 3 6 feet of 12 inch pipe were installed. 

Strawberry Hill Road: One structure and 3 6 feet of 12 inch pipe were installed. 

^Liberty Street: One hundred and twenty feet of 12 inch pipe were installed in the area of 2 1 Liberty Street. 

All 1,010 catch basins throughout the town were cleaned late in the fall. 

Signs and Lines. The Department is now replacing all old posts and installing two inch galvanized pipe. 
By next year all street name signs will be green and white, and all Stop and Railroad signs will be regulation 
size. 

Care of Grounds. The Town grounds were all mowed as usual. 
10 



The field house at Jones Field was destroyed by fire, and it was replaced with a metal van body which 
came on one of our surplus vehicles. This has served the purpose very well. Gravel was hauled in for the 
base of the new Elm Street tennis court and subdrains were installed. 

Disposal Area. The area continues to be well maintained by Arthur Conquest. 

It should be noted that there will be no more stumps dumped in the area. 

New Equipment. At the Town Meeting in March it was voted to buy a much-needed grader. A Gallion 
grader. Model T-600, was purchased, and it has worked out very well both in mixing and plowing. 

We acquired a cutter bar for the sidewalk plow so that this machine may now be used in the summer 
months to mow roadsides. In addition, two more snowplows were purchased. 

An air compressor was purchased for the garage. With the acquisition of a new sign machine we are 
now able to make all the standard signs. 

A set of used gang mowers was also acquired. They have been very helpful in the mowing of Jones Field. 

Snow Removal. At the beginning of the season snow fences were put up in various parts of town and sand 
barrels were placed at the churches, schools, fire stations, and at hazardous places throughout the town. 

We have 81 miles of town roadways to sand and plow, as well as the Fire and Police Stations, public 
parking lots, schools and sidewalks. We also now plow certain private ways. Snow is removed from the 
streets and walks in the three business areas after each storm. 

To do this job we have four sander-and-plow combinations, four dump-and-plow combinations, one side- 
walk plow, and the Caterpillar DW-15 which has a snow blower attachment and can also plow if needed. The 
new grader has worked well for plowing since, in addition to a conventional blade, it has a lateral blade for 
cutting down high snowbanks. The Trojan loader is used for loading sand and salt, clearing parking facilities, 
and keeping dumping areas clear during snow removal. 

In addition to the above town-owned equipment, we hire two sanders and seven snowplow trucks. 

During the 1966-1967 snow season we used 4,516 tons of sand and 1,202 tons of salt on town roadways 
and parking areas. 

I wish to thank the Board of Selectmen and the various Town Departments for their assistance and coop- 
eration throughout the year. 

Allen H. Nelson 
Superintendent of Streets 



STREET LIGHT 



During the 1967 year orders were placed for an additional 42 streetlights making a total of 506 in the 
town. In 1960 when this Committee was formed, there were 3 64 streetlights. 

In several instances requests for streetlights were not recommended by the Committee since the pro- 
posed location would aid only the petitioner and not materially affect the overall lighting of the town. 

We subscribe to the policy adopted with the formation of the Committee that new streetlights, in most 
instances, will be installed only at street intersections, dangerous curves, fire alarm boxes and locations 
designated as hazardous by the Fire Chief, Police Chief, or this Committee. 

Our suggested budget for 1968 should not be exceeded unless there is unexpected industrial development 
in the town. 

The Committee extends to the Board of Selectmen their sincere appreciation for their cooperation during 
the year 1967. 

Joseph F. Bushell, Chairman 
Leslie F. Parke 
Booth D. Jackson 



11 



ENGINEERING 



During 1967 the Engineering Department offered its services to the many Town Committees, Commis- 
sions, and Boards which requested assistance. We also continued day-by-day service for the general public 
seeking information pertaining to deeds, filed plans, zoning information, and other data available through 
this office. 

Assistance requested by the Board of Selectmen included: a study of the proposed Tennessee Gas trans- 
mission pipe line to be constructed through a portion of Acton; the design and supervision of the installation of 
a new sewage disposal system at the Acton Center Fire Station; a review of the area and plan of the land pur- 
chased by the Town for the proposed sewage treatment plant; the writing of contracts for gasoline and fuel oil. 
The Engineering Department also completed a revised plan for the layout of Central Street at Richardson's 
Crossing; wrote and filed with the South Middlesex Registry of Deeds orders of layout and orders of takings 
for the streets accepted at the Special Fall Town Meeting; made an extended survey and traverse for a layout 
of Minot Avenue; issued 4 9 street cut permits; investigated six alleged Hatch Act violations and submitted 
reports; filed an application and received approval from the State Department of Public Works to install a 
stop sign at the intersection of Spruce Street and Arlington Street; proposed and submitted to the State Depart- 
ment of Public Works an application to establish a school zone on Massachusetts Avenue from Kelly's Corner 
to Prospect Street utilizing State funds under Chapter 616 of the Acts of 1967; investigated and submitted three 
reports on Earth Removal Permits; prepared a plan and submitted a petition to the Middlesex County Commis- 
sioners for the discontinuance of High Street from Route 62, a distance of 110 feet, more or less. 

The Engineering Department assisted the Planning Board in reviewing plans for two subdivisions during 
1967; performed field inspections for seven subdivisions which were under construction; calculated road bond 
figures for the Planning Board so that lots in subdivisions could be released for sale or building. This depart- 
ment made semi-final inspections of subdivision roads which were petitioned to be accepted at the Special Fall 
Town Meeting, wrote the articles for the warrant, and made the final inspections with the Planning Board. 
Plans signed by the Planning Board not requiring subdivision approval were indexed and filed in the plan file 
for future reference. 

The Board of Assessors received their Atlas, revised and corrected to January 1, 1967. In conjunction 
with the revisions, the Board was supplied with information necessary for updating the street and parcel card 
file. Copies of all deeds for property transferred in 1966 were filed. Work has been started on revising the 
Town Atlas through 1967. Additional help was given to the Board in solving various problems related to dis- 
puted land ownership and area. Sets and sheets of the Town Atlas, sold by the Assessors, were prepared and 
sent out for printing. 

The Engineering Department staked out a new section of burial lots in Mount Hope Cemetery for the Cem- 
etery Commission. 

The Recreation Commission was assisted by the Engineering Department in the design, layout, and con- 
struction supervision of the Elm Street Tennis Courts. We also prepared sketches and plans of the Town 
Forest near Route 2. 

Work for the Highway Department consisted of survey, design, and field engineering for the Concord 
Road culvert; survey, design, field engineering for drainage easements, and the writing of the instruments 
for these easements on Central Street in the Prospect Street and the Downey Road areas; a profile of South Main 
Street from the Maynard Town Line to Pine Stneet for a drainage study; and consultation on other various 
drainage and construction problems. 

The Engineering Department extended its services to the School Committee during 1967. Field engineer- 
ing was provided for the installation of a new sewer line at the Acton- Boxborough Regional High School and a 
preliminary plan was compiled from available plans and deeds for the Dunn property now under a purchase and 
sale agreement with the Town. The Engineering Department prepared specifications for the survey of the Dunn 
property and reviewed the final plan before referring it to Town Counsel. 

A further study was conducted for the Sidewalk Committee on the proposed sidewalk program along Main 
Street, and construction plans and specifications are now underway for Spring construction. 

The Board of Health utilized our services for the preliminary plans and cost estimates for the renova- 
tions at the Sewage Disposal Facility in North Acton. After being voted at the Special Town Meeting, the 
Engineering Department prepared a contract including specifications and plans for the fencing, excavation and 
piping involved in the project. Construction has begun on this project. During the absence of a Board of 
Health Agent, the Town Engineer assumed the supervision, inspection of septic system installations, and 
review of plans for domestic sewage disposal facilities. 

Upon the retirement of Fire Chief H. S. MacGregor, the Town Engineer was appointed Deputy Building 
Inspector. During the month of December, due to the unfortunate illness of Mr. Kenneth Jewell, Building 
Inspector, and the mild weather, much time was devoted to the Building Inspection Department including 
building maintenance and zoning enforcement. 

12 



In addition, the following routine work was done by this department: maintaining and updating of Town 
Street, Zoning, Fire, and Police Maps; issuance of street cut permits and inspections of these street cuts; 
supplying the general public with information about properties, roads, drainage and other related matters. 

The Engineering Department lost the services of Mr. Charles Perkins on May 31, 1967, who had faith- 
fully served the Town on a part-time engineering consultant basis during the absence of a full time Town 
Engineer. I was hired as a full time Engineer by the Board of Selectmen and began work on June 2 6, 1967. 
The department was fortunate to have continued to engage Mr. Samuel Sutcliffe on a part-time basis during 
the year. 

I wish to extend my sincerest thanks to all those who have made my first six months of employment so 
pleasant, and especially to Mr. David Abbt, Engineering Assistant, whose assistance and knowledge of the 
town has been of immeasurable value to me personally and to the Town as a whole. 

Anthony L. Galeota, Jr. 
Town Engineer 



PLANNING BOARD 



A downward trend in the number of subdivisions submitted to the Planning Board is the important news 
this year. We approved one subdivision; namely. West Village, which contained ten lots located on Arlington 
Street near Fort Pond Brook. Concordian Heights, located off School Street, was revised and Assabet Valley 
Estates Section 11, off Central Street, was disapproved. 

The Planning Board met twice a month - the second and fourth Monday at 8 P. M. in the Hayward Road 
building. We held 2 8 regular and special meetings, 9 joint meetings with other local Boards, Committees, 
and Commissions and 3 public hearings. We initiated a regional meeting of the Planning Boards of Maynard, 
Stow, Boxborough, and Acton in April which gave us an opportunity to share ideas and discuss similar prob- 
lems such as large-lot zoning, the pros and cons of attracting business and industry, and regulation of the 
flood plain. 

In March, 1967, Mr. Edward Chambers was elected to the Board for a five-year term. The spring 
meeting of the Massachusetts Federation of Planning Boards was attended by David Tinker and Mrs. Donald 
Perkins. They also went to a meeting called by the Selectmen regarding the Eminent Domain Law & Pro- 
cedure. Mrs. Perkins went to six Town Administration Study Committee meetings. Charles O'Neal continued 
as our representative on the Acton Advisory Committee on Water Resources. 

A petition to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by adding recreational use in residential areas was pre- 
sented to the Selectmen for inclusion on the Warrant at the Annual Town Meeting. The Board held a public 
hearing which was well attended and then recommended its passage. Article 47 was passed by more than two- 
thirds vote - 215 yes, 12 no. There have been two recreation plans submitted to the Board of Appeals for 
consideration under this zoning change. 

At the November Special Town Meeting, four streets were accepted, but there were no zoning changes 
submitted. 

The Planning Board contracted for the services of a professional planning consultant to evaluate the best 
use for the land opposite the First National store near the Kelly's corner intersection. The consultant con- 
firmed the Board's opinion that this total area (2 7 plus acres) should not be rezoned at this time for business 
use. Suggested uses for the land were municipal or public use or recreational use. These suggestions were 
discussed in detail at meetings with the Selectmen, Finance Committee, School Committee, and Land Acquisi- 
tion-Town Building Committee. The Planning Board is convinced that there is a strong need to have available 
the services of a competent town planner to supplement the work of the Town Engineer^and others. Although a 
new Master Plan study is not contemplated at this time, "a continuing in-depth review of various problems 
within the scope of the Planning Board's activity is a sound approach to planning land use. The aforementioned 
survey made by Adams, Howard & Oppermann is a step in that direction. 

The Board has met on a continuing basis with the Conservation Commission in an effort to develop a zon- 
ing regulation protecting watershed areas in the town. The proposed amendment to the Protective Zoning 
Bylaw is currently in the first draft stage. The definition of the area to be included within the watershed and 
the compilation and evaluation of the pertinent engineering data have consumed most of the Board's time. 
Hearings are scheduled for January, 1968, and also for the spring and fall to discuss this subject, which has 
been receiving a good deal of attention in Acton. The Board urges the public to attend these hearings. 

The following areas of concern will be studied by us this next year: (1) buffer zones, sideline, set back 
and parking requirements; (2) further clarification in the Business and Industrial zones for non- manufacturing 

13 



uses; (3) revision of special uses by permit from the Board of Appeals in Residential areas and rezoning in 
general. 

On June 28th, the Planning Board welcomed Mr. Anthony Galeota, Town Engineer, to our meeting. 
We were glad to have a full time engineer again to help us make important decisions. Mr. David Abbt, Engi- 
neering Assistant, deserves our praise for his conscientious efforts and capable work. Our special thanks to 
Mrs. Arnold Woodward, our secretary, for her ability to write complete minutes, keep our files in order and 
arrange an orderly agenda for our meetings. 

Charles E. Orcutt, .Jr., Chairman 
Beatrice C. Perkins, Clerk 
Edward A. Chambers 
Charles D. O'Neal, Jr. 
David P. Tinker 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



The Acton Board of Appeals held twelve public hearings during the year 1967 on the following matters: 

Petitions for permits for earth removal 
Granted 1; Denied 0; Pending 3. 

Petitions for specific uses and exceptions 
Granted 0; Denied 1; Pending 1. 

Variances from requirements of the Protective Zoning Bylaw 

Frontage requirements 

Granted 0; Denied 0; Pending 1. 

Set-Back and side line requirements 
Granted 4; Denied 0; Pending 0. 

Use and density requirements 
Granted 0; Denied 1. 

John J. Bush, Jr. 
Edward G. Schwarm 
H. William Flood 



BUILDING COMMITTEE 



During the year 1967, the Acton Permanent Building Committee worked on the following projects: 

1. Elm Street Elementary School: All items in the Elementary School are finally taken care of and 
the building is accepted as of December 31, 1967. 

2. Library Addition: The library addition has been completed and accepted. 

3. Cemetery Garage and Office: The building is now under construction and expected to be completed 
in the spring of 1968. 

4. Arlington Street- Spruce Street Elementary School: The plans for this elementary school were 
accepted and the project bid. The contract was awarded on April 6, 1967. As of December 31, 
1967, the construction is very close to schedule even though the weather and strikes caused 
some delay. 

5. The Building Committee worked on other Town projects during the year 1967 in cooperation with 
the Selectmen and other Town Committees. 



14 



Arnold H. Mercier resigned and Richard L. Hodgman was appointed Chairman. Robert E. Sweeney 
also resigned as he moved out of town. John H. Boyd was appointed by the Selectmen to fill the vacancy 
caused by the resignation of Arnold H. Mercier. Thomas Regan will be appointed by the Selectmen in 
January 1968. 

Richard L. Hodgman, Chairman 

Frank H. Weatherby, Clerk 

John H. Boyd 

Edwin Richter (School Committee) 

Parker Harrison, Jr. (School Committee) 

Marvin L. Tolf (Library Trustee) 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy (Cemetery Dept. ) 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



A marked increase in building in the Town of Acton has been noted during the past year, bringing the 
total number of permits issued in 1967 to 328, at an estimated cost of $6,662,436.00. The largest contributing 
factor is the increase of single dwellings, even though there was only one newly approved subdivision during 
1967. Building in previously approved subdivisions has increased, particularly Concordian Heights Subdivi- 
sion off School Street in South Acton. 

A total number of forty-seven permits was issued during the month of December (forty of which were 
for single dwellings) which is a record number for any single month previously recorded. This is an inter- 
esting observation as the number of permits issued usually starts to decline during the month of December. 

Multiple family dwellings, and business and commercial buildings are keeping pace with the trend 
started in 1966. Permits for alterations and repairs, garages, and porches for residential uses (94 at an esti- 
mated cost of $194,320.) has decreased somewhat during 1967, but the construction of swimming pools has 
definitely been rising, and 1 expect will continue to do so. 

Due to the increased use of utility grade lumber, specification tables for spacing and spans have been 
prepared and sent to the most active builders in town. Copies are also available at the Town Hall Annex. 

A complete list of permits for the year 1967 is listed below: 

Area No. of Permits Estimated Cost 

Residential 

Single Dwellings 176 $4, 010, 000 

Multiple Dwellings 8 Bldgs. - 79 Units 504, 000 

Additions, Repairs 56 131, 910 

Garages 20 46,2 00 

Porches 18 16,210 

Swimming Pools 2 47,316 

Miscellaneous 8 16, 300 

Commercial 

Business Buildings, including 

a 12 Bed Nursing Home at 

$3 00,000 and Professional 

Building at $2 00,000. 9 643,800 

Alterations and Additions 13 46, 750 

Municipal 

Elementary School - Spruce Street 1 1, 166, 950 

Cemetery Garage and Office !_ 33, 000 

Total 328 $6,662,436 

Receipts 

Fees for Permits $ 10,282.52 

The number of violations in the past year has decreased by fifty per cent from the violations of the pre- 
vious year. This is particularly good news during a year of such marked increased building, and I hope it 
continues during 1968. 



15 



Violations of Zoning &t Building Laws 

Houses started before permit issued 

House started - No 4x6 drop girt 

House not according to code 

House framed before permit 

House without bulkhead 

Houses occupied before occupancy permit issued 

Foundations poured without permit 

Sill too near ground 

Addition to home - no permit 

Alteration to home - no permit 

Barn built - no permit 

Chinnney improperly constructed 

Chimney too short 

Fireplace not to code 

Fireplace mantle shelf protruding too much 

Swimming pools, no permit 

Business equipment garaged in residential area 



No. 



1 
1 
1 
1 

1-1 

4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
1 



Action 

Stopped until permit 

issued 

Corrected 

Corrected 

Permit issued 

Pending 
8 Permits issued 
3 Pending 

Permits issued 

Corrected 

Permit issued 

Permit issued 

Permit issued 

Corrected 

Corrected 

Rebuilt 

Corrected 

Permits issued 

Pending 



Kenneth E. Jewell 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 



I herewith submit my report as Inspector of Wires for the year ending December 31, 1967. 

Three Hundred Fifty One permits were issued. The sum of Two Thousand Eight Hundred Seventy-Seven 
dollars and twenty-five cents ($2,877.25), was collected in fees for these permits, and turned over to the 
Treasurer. 

Leslie F. Parke 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS 



Total number devices inspected - 172; sealed - 169; condemned - 3. 

Sealing fees collected and paid to Treasurer - $351.75. Uncollected fees - December 31, 1967 - $40.00'. 

George K. Hayward 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



I herewith submit my report for Animal Inspector for the year ending 1967. 



Premises inspected 30 

Cows 117 

Young cattle 54 

Bulls 7 

Beef cattle 12 



Swine. 
Goats . 
Sheep. 
Horses 



4 


5 

69 



Dog Bites 44 

Dogs Quarantined 44 



Carl W. Flint 



16 



HEALTH 



This year has seen the further expansion of our nursing service into a Home Health Agency. This 
increase in services and scope of programs was stimulated by the "Medicaid Act". However, the services 
of our department are available to people of all ages. 

In addition to the services of our full time nurse it was necessary to gain the help of a part-time nurse. 
Other personnel added to the staff on a contractual basis were a nursing supervisor, a physical therapist and 
most recently a medical social worker. 

The major function of the agency is to promote and protect the health of all citizens of Acton with ser- 
vices to children, mothers and the aged. This includes providing skilled nursing care and other therapeutic 
services in the form of bedside care to people ill at home. 

We are involved with communicable diseases by encouraging immunization, organizing clinics for detec- 
tion and control and by investigation of reported cases. The inspection of schools, kindergartens and nursing 
homes is also undertaken by the Board of Health. We provide maternal and child health services by assisting 
pregnant women in securing early and continuous medical and dental care, investigating premature babies and 
organize programs in accident prevention. We assist those families who request help with the mentally and 
physically handicapped and work with a selected group of families who need concerted supportive help to main- 
tain a reasonably stable home. 

In addition to our regular clinics such as the Tuberculosis Clinic for children in Grades 1, 4, 7, and 9, 
and the measles clinics for the general public, this past year we added a very successful Amblyopia (Lazy Eye) 
clinic for pre-school children. 

As dictated by the "Medicaid Act", an annual cost survey of our nursing service was undertaken and like 
all other medical services an increased cost was observed. This was found to be six dollars per visit. How- 
ever, when compared with surrounding communities Acton was one of the lowest. One of the side benefits of 
some recent state legislation has made reimbursement for some agencies, such as the Welfare Department, 
available to Acton. This has greatly helped to offset the increase in costs to the town. The following are 
some interesting figures in connection with the above. 

The nursing service made 1,864 home visits this year, 1,222 of these were to people over 
65 years of age. This is an increase of 808 home visits over last year. Total collections 
for the year were over $5,000 with Medicare payments representing $3,300. of this total. 
The remainder of these funds came from Blue Cross, the Welfare Department, Veterans' 
benefits and cash. This is an increase of $3,500 returned to the town over the previous 
year. 

The total advantage to the Town of Acton has been the increase in the amount of care, additional types 
of care, and increased quality of care made available to its residents. All this has been accomplished with 
only a minimal increase in town costs to the taxpayer. 

Inspection of Construction of Sewage Disposal System 

To obtain the maximum performance of each Sewage Disposal System constructed in the town, the 
Board of Health established a requirement to license all Installers of Sewage Disposal Systems. During 
1967 thirteen individuals or contractors engaged in this type of activity obtained an Installer's permit at an 
annual cost of $2 5.00. This is a first time cost and a renewal fee of $10.00 per year will be charged if the 
license has not been allowed to lapse or has not been suspended or revoked. 

The Installer must have a working xinderstanding of the Acton Sanitary Code and its requirements as 
revised on December 1, 1966 and must also perform the construction of each system so as to comply with 
the Acton Sanitary Code including provisions of Article XI "Minimum Requirements for the Disposal of Sani- 
tary Sewage in Unsewered Area". 

Semi-public and Public Swimming Pools 

A semi-public swimming pool was discovered under construction without proper permits and work had 
to be stopped. In accordance with Article VI, Department of Public Health Sanitary Code, Regulation #2, 
which says "to construct or install a semi-public swimming or wading pool or to expand, remodel an existing 
facility, the plans and specifications for the construction must be approved in writing by the Board of Health." 
Article VI of the Department of Public Health Sanitary Code "Minimum Standard for Swimming Pools" is the 
basis for construction, care and maintenance of all public or semi-public pools. 

Registration of Retail Food Establishments 

On December 13, 1967, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Public Health, Division of 
Food and Drug, passed a regulation under authority of Section 35H of Chapter 94 of the General Laws, to 

17 



require all Retail Food Establishments be registered with the State Department of Public Health. This and 
the accompanying inspection necessary will be done by the local Board of Health. 

Septic Tank Care 

Most of the water used in our homes only carries off wastes. Drinking, cooking, and washing the family 
car use less water than doing the dishes, bathing and flushing the toilet. Wastes carried away by water from 
kitchens and bathroonas are called sewage. Wherever possible, sewage should be collected in community sewers 
and carried away to a central treatment plant. In Acton septic tanks and underground leaching or absorption sys- 
tems are used. 




^,^<r^Jli.{d!^^(i,.J.r^_(.^^ 




} SCUM 



LIQUID 



SOLIDS 



Septic Tank 



A septic tank system will serve a home satisfactorily only if it is properly located, designed, constructed, 
and adequately maintained. Even a good system which does not have proper care and attention may become a 
nuisance, and a burdensome expense. 

To obtain satisfactory service, the homeowner must know something about the design, operation and main- 
tenance of his own septic tank system. 

Where it is impossible to connect to a community sewer, the home buyer should satisfy himself that his 
septic tank system is properly designed and constructed to serve the anticipated number of occupants of the 
house. He should also be sure that the system is located where it is not likely to endanger water supply systems, 
and that the leaching system, pits or tile fields, are capable of disposing of liquid wastes under year-round 
weather conditions. This information is available at your local health department. 

When septic tank systems are improperly designed or maintained, liquid wastes may overflow to the ground 
surface or the plumbing in the home may often be stopped up. 

The purpose of a septic tank is to treat household wastes, including soapy water from the laundry and the 
bath, discarded food scraps, and body wastes. The normal use of bleaches, detergents, soaps and drain clean- 
ers does not harm or interfere with the operation of the system. 

A septic tank is a watertight structure in which organic solids are decomposed by natural bacterial pro- 
cesses. The flow of sewage is slowed in its passage through the tank so that larger solids settle to the bottom 
and accumulate as sludge. Finer particles remain in suspension and pass through the tank. 

The bacteria present in a tank are able to thrive in the absence of oxygen. Such decomposition in the 
absence of air is called "septic," which led to the naming of the tank. Solids and scum are digested and reduced 
to a smaller volume by the bacteria in the tank. However, a residue of inert solid material remains which must 
be stored during the interval between tank cleanings. 

The frequency of cleaning depends on the size of the septic tank and the number of people it serves. When a 
garbage grinder is used, more frequent cleaning will be required. With ordinary use and care, a septic tank usu- 
ally requires cleaning every 2 years. The homeowner can make measurements and decide for himself when his 
tank needs cleaning. When the total depth of scum and solids (see sketch) exceeds one -half of the liquid depth of the 
tank, the tank should be cleaned. The accumulated solids are ordinarily pumped out by companies that make a busi 
ness of cleaning septic tanks. Your local health department knows which local companies do this work satisfactor- 
ily. The solids removed should be buried or disposed of in a manner approved by your local health department to 
avoid obnoxious odors and health hazards. 

There are no known chemicals, yeasts, bacteria, enzymes or other substances capable of eliminating or 
reducing the solids and scum in a septic tank so that periodic cleaning is unnecessary. Contrary to some beliefs, 
the addition of such products is not necessary for the proper functioning of a septic tank sewage disposal system. 



&. 



To facilitate cleaning and maintenance the homeowner should have a diagram of his septic tank system, 
showing the location of the house, the septic tank manholes, the piping, and the leaching system. 



i 



Septic tank and leaching systems frequently are damaged when heavy trucks or other equipment drive 
over them. An accurate diagram of the system enables the homeowner to keep heavy vehicles away from the 
critical area. A line of cast iron pipe instead of tile should be installed under any necessary crossings for 
heavy vehicles. 

Neglect of the septic tank, however, is the most frequent cause of damage to leaching systems. When 
the tank is not cleaned, solids build up until they are carried into the underground leaching pipe system, 
where they block the flow of the liquid into the soil. When this happens, the leaching system must be uncover- 
ed, cleaned, and relocated - a costly undertaking. The precautions of periodic inspection and cleaning of the 
tank prevent this needless expense and work 

Board of Health 



Mr. Robert Heustis, Agent for the Board of Health, left to take a similar position with the Town of Lex- 
ington, Massachusetts, in July, 1967. Mr. Bradford Leach, R. S., was employed on a contract basis to take 
Mr. Heustis' place and has been working a limited schedule performing necessary inspections and surveys. 

Mr. Anthony Galeota, Jr., Town Engineer, helped fill the gap left by Mr. Heustis by providing engineer- 
ing inspections for a short period in the early fall. Mrs. Louise Wardwell, a secretary for the town, has done 
an outstanding job in handling the administrative duties since Mr. Leach works only a thirty hour week on Board 
of Health matters. 

The Board has made a study to determine the best method of handling the increased engineering, inspec- 
tion, and administrative workload and has proposed a part-time agent and assistant agent to the Selectmen and 
Personnel Board. The resultant cost is approximately the same as for the present contract arrangement. 

Garbage Contract 

During the contract year April 1, 1967 to April 1, 1968, the garbage collection contractor had an increase 
in the number of homes serviced of 146. His basic contract - executed as of April 1, 1966 provided for garbage 
pick up at 2658 homes and establishments per the Assessor's records. The bid price of $2 1,000 for the year 
established a rate of $7.90 per location, per year. 

The Assessor figure for the year beginning April 1, 1967 was 2804 locations representing a total increase 
of $1153.40 in garbage collection cost for the year at the same rate. This same rate increase is stipulated for 
the remaining year of the contract period and the 1968 budget is increased accordingly. 

^ Each home should, by the terms of the contract, have a collection once each week. If such collections 

y are not made, contact the Board of Health except in cases where the contractor cannot gain access to the gar- 
2_bage can or because the garbage contains other than animal or vegetable matter. 

Mosquito Control 

In the Spring of 1967, the Board of Health hired helicopter services to spray open water areas and swamp 
lands. This was to kill mosquito larvae that feed from the water surfaces. In addition, there were five spray- 
ings throughout the town by the fogging machine. Material used for this is one to two gallons Whittox 85 Con- 
centrate to 100 gallons of fuel oil. Whittox 85 contains 19.9% Lethane (beta butoxy beta'thiocyano diethyl ether - 
44.7% Malathion - dimethyl dithio-phosphate of diethyl mercoptosuccinate - 35.5% Petroleum distillate. 

Early in December, a seminar was held at the Division of Fish and Game Headquarters in Westboro 
sponsored by the Pesticide Chemicals Information Center of the Cooperative Extension Service in the Depart- 
ment of Entomology and Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts. This was on 
the subject of pesticides and their proper and safe use. 

Lectures, panel discussions and many films describing and discussing all pest areas (mosquitoes, ticks, 
green heads) were presented by Fish and Ganne officials as well as pest control authorities. The main value 
of the seminar seemed to be a definite opinion that a reduction in health hazard to animal and human life had 
been met with the introduction of Malathion, or comparable pesticides, and the discontinuing of D. D. T. products. 

Walden Clinic 



The Walden Clinic is a quality, non-profit center for the diagnosis and treatment of emotional and mental 
disorders. The patients are almost all children. Financial support of the clinic is derived from the state, 
voluntary contributions, fees and from tax contributions from the participating communities. 

During fiscal 1966-1967, fifty-three patients from Acton were examined and treated at Walden Clinic. 
The ages ranged from 4 to 17 years. The source of referrals: 19 - Medical, 13 - self-referred, 15 - school, 
6 - other community sources. 

Acton utilized 368 hours of clinic time and only Concord exceeded this utilization. The Board has recom- 
mended this program for the past two years and considers it highly successful. 



19 



Sewage Disposal Site - Town Forest 

At the Special Town Meeting of November 13, 1967, a special Board of Health appropriation for $10,000 
was approved by the voters. The article was subnnitted following investigation by the Agent and Board, and 
consultation with the Town Engineer. 

Approximately $5,000 will be used for repairs and enlargement of existing septic tank refuse disposal 
areas. The additional $5,000 will be used for a chain link fence to enclose the disposal area as a protection 
for children and animals. 



Clinics, Inspections, Permits and Licenses 

Clinics 

Dental 12 

Lazy Eye 

Measles 

Tuberculin Screening Tests - Grades 1, 4, 7, 9 
13 school employees 



Comraiunicable Diseases 

Chicken Pox 

German Measles 

Mumps 

Salmonella 

Streptococcal infection 

Tuberculosis (Committed) 

Tuberculosis (Non- infectious) 



Cases Reported 



No. of Persons 

55 

245 
123 

2015 
Communicable Diseases 



16 


Infectious Hepatitis 


1 


Measles 


55 




none 


Other Cases Reported 


24 




none 


Animal Bites 


none 


Total Cases Reported 



Amount Collected 
$ 9. 00 

29. 00 

$38. 00 

Cases Reported 

1 
2 

8 

122 



Chapter 111, Section 111 of the General Laws, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, requires that all communica- 
ble diseases must be reported to the Board of Health. Phone 263-4736. 

Births: Premature - 16 



Inspections No. 

Food Handling Establishments 2 3 

Schools and Kindergartens 12 

Swimming Pools 8 

Slaughtering Inspections 

Nursing Homes 2 

Permits fc Licenses Issued 

Burial or Removal Permits 25 

Catering Permits 

Kindergarten & Nursery Schools 7 

Offal Transport- 4 

Overnight Cabins & Camps 

Massage License 
Methyl Alcohol 

Milk Store 8 

Milk Dealers 5 



Permits fc Licenses Cont'd 

Total Collected Misc. Items 

Plumbing Permits 

Gas Permits 

Sewerage Works Permits: 
New at $25. 00 

Repairs & Alterations at $5.00 
Total 

Total Collected for Sewerage 
Installer's Permits 

Town Nurse Services 
Nursing visits made totaled 1865. 
1222 of these visits were to people 
over 65. $4,811.53 was collected 
for nursing service. Medicare 
reimbursement was $3,302.18. 

Total Transferred to Town Treasurer 



No. 



Fees Collected 





$ 456.50 


260 


2, 545. 80 


226 


1, 703. 50 


193 




24 




217 


4, 945. 00 



325. 00 
4, 811. 53 



$14, 816.33 



Board of Health Members: 

Johns. Golden, D. D. S., Chairman 
George W. Moulton 
Daniel J. O'Connor, M. D. 



20 



WELFARE 



Submitted herewith is the report of the Board of Public Welfare for the year 1967. 

The Board continued to operate as an independent unit within the administrative framework of the 
Nashoba Public Welfare District comprising the towns of Acton, Bedford, and Carlisle with its office located 
in the Town Hall, Bedford, Telephone Number 275-6668. 

Old Age Assistance: An average per month of 2 9 recipients were aided under this category. 

Total Expenditures $25, 773. 03 

Federal Share $16, 563. 00 

State Share 5, 627.27 22, 190. 27 

Acton Share 3, 582. 7'6 

Medical Assistance: This category of aid covers eligible children up to the age of 21 and individuals 65 
and over and those between the ages of 2 1 and 64 who are permanently and totally disabled. It provides com- 
plete medical coverage after all health insurance credits have been applied. 

Total Expenditures 91, 990. 33 

Federal Share 39,920.14 

State Share 26,213. 11 66, 133. 25 

Acton Share 25,857.08 

Aid to Families with Dependent Children: An average of 10 families and 25 children per month received 
assistance under this category of aid. 

Total Expenditures 16, 338. 11 

Federal Share 7, 472 . 00 

State Share 4, 885.56 12, 357. 56 

Acton Share 3, 980. 55 

Disability Assistance: A program which provides subsistence payments plus medical coverage for 
those who are permanently and totally disabled between the ages of 18 and 64. Under this category we aided 
2 individuals throughout the year. 

Total Expenditures 1, 070. 15 

Federal Share 900. 00 900. 00 

Acton Share 170. 15 

General Relief: An emergency assistance program for immediate aid. Under this category we aided 
one family with 5 children plus 5 individuals throughout the year. 

Total Expenditures 1, 067. 50 

State Share 213. 50 213. 50 

Acton Share 854. 00 

Estimated Expenditures for 1968: 

Public Assistance - All Categories 89, 008. 00 

Salaries for Board Members 2 00. 00 

Acton's Share of Administration 3, 000. 00 

Total 92, 008. 00 

Should the Commonwealth assume welfare costs on July 1, 1968, approximately one-half of the above 
total appropriated would be expended for 1968, the balance of which would be returned to the Town's General 
Fund. 

Clinton S. Curtis, Chairman 
Patience H. MacPherson 
Ivar Pederson 

Board of Public Welfare 



21 



CONSERVATION 



At the Annual Town Meeting in March, the Comnnission received approval to purchase twenty-six acres 
of land in East Acton from Laurence Richardson. This abuts the twenty-two acres of land purchased m 1966 
and provides varied open and wooded lands for conservation. During the year, several other land owners have 
been contacted relative to land available for conservation purposes. The Commission is hoping to receive 
approval to purchase approximately thirty acres of land on the southwesterly side of Grassy Pond at the annual 
town meeting. 

The Commission is continuing its efforts to preserve the Isaac Davis Trail. Agreements for two more 
easements have been obtained and will hopefully be presented to the town for acceptance at the annual meeting. 

In April, Franklin Charter was appointed a permanent member of the Conservation Commission to fill 
the term vacated by Kenneth Jewell. The Commission has received state and national recognition for the arti- 
cle in the 1966 Town Report, showing how the forces of conservation and natural resources can work together. 

During the year, members of the Commission have attended two Hatch Act hearings. They continue to 
maintain an active interest in the results of these hearings. 

Robert J. Ellis, Chairman 
Chauncey W. Waldron, Jr. 
Franklin H. Charter 
Samuel Sutcliffe 
Alice H. May 
William L. Kingman 
Richard H. Murphy 

Conservation Commission 



SEWERAGE STUDY 



Subsequent to June 1966 when the sewerage program was first presented to the town at a Special Meeting, 
federal and state legislatures substantially increased financial aid available to towns constructing sewerage 
systems. Federal grants of up to 55% of the construction cost of a sewerage treatment plant and interceptors 
were authorized with state grants of up to 30% of the construction costs. 

In January 1967 the Board of Selectmen called a Joint Meeting on sewerage to bring together reports 
from the various committees and boards and to plan a course of action leading to the March Annual Town 
Meeting. The consultant to the Sewerage Study Committee (Metcalf and Eddy), revised the financial analysis 
to reflect an increase in federal and state aid that had taken place during the year. 

For the March Annual Town Meeting, eight articles were prepared and submitted for consideration. 
These articles called for creation of a Sewerage Commission to oversee the design and construction of a 
sewerage system, appropriation of monies for design and construction of the initial phase of the system, 
authorization to apply for federal and state aid, purchase of a site for a sewage treatment plant and for deter- 
mination of a means of making betterment assessments. The Sewerage Study Committee prepared a special 
report for distribution to the townspeople which explained the eight articles and the Sewerage Study Committee 
rationale. Reports from the various town committees and boards collected at the January meeting were 
included as appendices. 

Formation of the Sewerage Commission and all actions relative to design and construction of the sewer- 
age system were defeated. The town, however, authorized the Board of Selectmen to acquire land bounded 
approximately by High Street, Parker Street, Town of Maynard, and the Assabet River for a Sewerage Treat- 
ment Plant. On May 8 the Department of Public Health and the Division of Water Pollution Control conducted 
a hearing under Section 6 of Chapter 83 of the General Laws relative to the taking of a site in the Town of 
Acton for sewage disposal purposes. On May 8 the Water-Resources Comnnission voted to approve the peti- 
tion of the Town of Acton and the Department of Public Health approved on May 9. The Town of Acton acquired 
title to this land in the fall. 

Mr. Paul R. Nyquist, who served as chairman of the Sewerage Study Committee since its creation re- 
signed in April. Mr. Edward Patrick and Mr. Gordon Platine also resigned. The vacancies were filled by 
Messrs. Robert Caplan, Brad Leach, and Daniel Costello. Mr. Robert Gerhardt was elected as the new 
chairman. 

22 



The Sewerage Study Committee in cooperation with the Board of Selectmen and Board of Health, devel- 
oped a charter to govern the work of the committee in the future. 

At this time the committee cannot identify a single overriding need for town sewerage. However, 
several factors, such as elimination of pollution in Fort Pond Brook and convenience favor sewerage. 

R. Gerhardt, Chairman 
R. C apian 
D. Costello 
B. Leach 
S. Lewis 

Sewerage Study Committee 



GOODNOW FUND 



INVESTMENTS 



Charlestown Savings Bank 
Concord Co-operative Bank 



; 465.54 
3, OOP. 00 



$3,465. 54 



RECEIPTS 



Charlestown Savings Bank 
Concord Co-operative Bank 



24. 39 
135. 00 



159. 39 



EXPENDITURES 



Treasurer of the Evangelical Church in Acton 
Town of Acton for perpetual care of the Goodnow Lot 
in Woodlawn Cemetery 



139. 39 
20. 00 



159. 39 



Thelma L. Boatman, Tr. 
Clark C. McElvein 
James N. Gates 

Trustees 



ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 



The Trustees of this Fund have signed orders to the Town Treasurer totaling $850. 00 



Hazel P. Vose 
Eleanor P. Wilson 
Helen B. Wood 

Trustees 



23 



SCHOOL REPORT 



ACTON SCHOOL DEPARTMENT AND ACTON-BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



ORGANIZATION 



Acton School Committee 



Albert W. Koch, Chairman . 
Edith D. Stowell, Secretary. 

Parker Harrison, Jr 

Harry B. Morse 

Edwin W. Richter 

Roy J. Zabierek 



Term Expires 

1969 
1970 
1968 
1968 
1970 
1969 



Acton-Boxborough Regional District School Committee 

Term Expires 

Edwin W. Richter, Chairman. : . . . . 1970 

Parker Harrison, Jr., Vice Chairman . 1968 

Leonard E. Ceglowski 1970 

Joseph H. Hartshorn 1968 

Ruth F. Kennedy 1969 

Albert W. Koch 1969 

Harry B. Morse 1968 

Edith D. Stowell 1970 

Roy J. Zabierek 1969 



The Acton School Committee holds regular meetings on the third Monday of each month and the Regional 
School Committee meets on the second and fourth Mondays. Both groups convene at the Acton-Boxborough 
Regional High School Library at 7:30 p. m. 



Telephone 



Superintendent of Schools, William L. O'Connell 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Alan M. White 

Administrative Assistant, Priscilla Felt 

Principals: McCarthy School, Alice F. Hayes 

Towne School and grades housed in the Junior High School, James Palavras 

Merriam School, Carolyn T. Douglas 

Douglas School, Robert C. Conroy 

Acton-Boxborough Junior High School, Arthur F. Hayes 

Henry J. Wall, Vice Principal . . . 

Acton-Boxborough Senior High School, Raymond J. Grey 

Donald A. MacLeod, Vice Principal 

Director of Guidance, Ruth R. Proctor 

School Physician, Paul P. Gates, M. D 

School Nurse, Acton Public Schools, Eileen Hale 

School Nurse, Acton-Boxborough Schools, Helen L. Rhodes 

Director of Cafeterias, Theodorus Tumelaire 

Attendance Officer, David W. Scribner 

Secretaries: School Lunch Program, Marion Osterhoudt 

McCarthy School, Dorothy Hansen 

Towne School, Maria Cranna 

Merriam School, Irene Heroux 

Douglas School, Beverly Tyler 

Health Office, Margaret Larsen 

Acton-Boxborough Junior High School - Mary Ott 

Barbara Primiano 

Acton-Boxborough Senior High School - Main Office, Virginia Ott 

Principal's Office, Dorothy Geno . 

Guidance Office, High School, Dorothy Harding 

Phyllis Sutherland 

Guidance Office, Junior High School, Helen Cashell 

Superintendent's Office - Kate Haggerty 

Molly Johnston 

Norma Mason 



263- 
2 63- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
2 63- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
2 63- 
263- 
2 63- 
263- 
263- 
2 63- 
2 63- 
2 63- 
263- 
2 63- 
263- 
2 63- 
263- 
263- 
2 63- 
2 63- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
2 63- 
263- 
263- 



5737 
5737 
5737 
4982 
2 042 
2581 
2753 
7716 
7716 
7738 
7738 
2492 
5671 
4982 
7738 
7977 
5221 
7977 
4982 
2042 
2581 
2753 
4982 
7716 
7716 
7738 
7738 
2492 
2492 
7718 
5737 
5737 
5737 



Cafeteria Staffs: 

McCarthy School: 

Douglas School: 

Merriam School: 



Martha Lowden, Manager; Gladys Cady, Julia Costello, Muriel Lombardo, June 

Magoon, Marjorie Trebendis, Liselotte Stewart. 

Evelyn Hill, Manager; Eva Campbell, Alice Castelline, Jean Kiely, Kathryn 

Peterson, Lucille Plunkett. 

Mary Tuttle, Manager; Patricia Adams, Ann Brown, Gloria Driscoll, Virginia 

McPherson, Reina Peterson. 



24 



Cafeteria Staffs (cont'd): 

Acton-Boxborough Jxrnior High School: 



Acton-Boxborough Senior High School: 



Anna D 'Italia, Manager; Barbara Bailey, Esther Davis, Laura 
Foote, Jean Galluzzo, Elizabeth Hanson, Edith Noftle, Barbara 
Ryan, Christine Scribner. 

Meimi Fullonton, Manager; Margaret Brennan, Barbara Davis, 
Hannah Durkin, Lois Goodwin, Dolores Nowokunski, Dorothy 
Patrick, Jean Smith, Ellen Tuomanen. 



Custodians: 



Head Custodian, Emery Nelson 
McCarthy School, John Conquest 
Towne School, Peter Smoltees 
Merriam School: Robert Graham, 
Douglas School: Paul Richardson, 
Acton-Boxborough Junior High School 
Acton-Boxborough Senior High School 



Thomas Kierce 

Homer Reynolds 

Peter Ryan, Elmer Gahan, Roland Wetherbee, Clyde Gurskey 
Russell Wolfe, Nathan Roberts, Edward Lowd, Olin Bradbury 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 1968-1969 



Reopening of all Schools 
Winter Recess 
Good Friday 
Spring Recess 
Memorial Day 
Graduation 
Close of School 
Summier Recess 
Teachers' Meetings 
Reopening of all Schools 



January 2, 1968 
February 19-23 
April 12 
April 15-19 
May 30 
June 7 
June 18 



September 3, 
September 4 



1968 



Teachers' Convention 
Veteran's Day 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Christmas Holiday 
Reopening of all Schools 
Winter Vacation 
Good Friday 
Spring Vacation 
Memorial Day 
Graduation 
Close of Schools 



October 22 

November 11 

Noon- Nov. 27, 28, 29 

Dec. 23 - Jan. 1, 1969 

January 2, 1969 

February 24-2 8 

April 4 

April 21-25 

May 30 

June 6 

June 18 (183 days) 



NO SCHOOL SIGNAL 



1-1-1-1 
2-2-2-2 



7:15 A.M. 
7:00 A.M. 



No School Acton Public Schools, Grades 1-6 
No School All Schools All Day 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



To the School Committees and the Citizens of Acton: 



Herewith is presented my annual report as Superintendent of Schools for Acton and Acton-Boxborough 
Regional School District. 

Housing. With the opening of the school on Spruce Street in the fall of 1968, a total of eighty-four class- 
rooms will be available to house grades one through six. Included in this total are the two classrooms for 
special education, which are presently housed in the Church of Good Shepherd. A breakdown of our class- 
rooms as they will be in September 1968 is as follows: 



McCarthy School 
Towne School 
Merriam School 
Douglas School 
Spruce Street School 



12 
12 
20 
20 
20 
84 
- 2 
82 



(Special Education Classes) 



With an estimated enrollment of 2130 students in grades one through six and a ratio of one teacher to 
twenty-five students, a total of eighty-five classrooms would be needed in September 1968. 

Your Superintendent and School Committee are aware of the mandatory kindergarten law which requires 
all towns and cities in the Commonwealth to set up kindergartens by 1973 at the latest. We estimate that this 
will require six classrooms. Suitable rooms are also badly needed in the Special Services programs - 
(a) remedial reading, (b) speech, (c) reading perception, (d) guidance, and (e) a special education and treat- 
ment program for emotionally disturbed children as required by the latest law Chapter 71, Sections 46H and I. 

This past year the town purchased twenty-four acres of land located on Minot Avenue and Taylor Road 
for the building and equipping of two elementary schools. It is hoped that the first school on this site will be 



25 



ready for occupancy by September 1970. To stay ahead of our enrollment and maintain a proper teacher- 
student ratio, ground should be broken for this school in the spring of 1969. 

The secondary level will also be in need of a new school in the near future. The original high school 
was opened in 1957 and an addition to this school in January 1962. A new junior high school was opened in 
September 1966. The large elementary classes are now reaching the junior and senior high schools and we 
will soon run out of space. Therefore, the Regional School Committee is looking at sites for the construction 
and equipping of a new secondary school. 

Cost of Education. The 1968 school budgets will show a marked increase this year due mainly to a new 
salary schedule and the opening of the elementary school on Spruce Street (September - December 1968). As 
in most towns and cities, Acton's largest increase is for Instruction costs, which are close to 80% of the 
entire budget. The new state minimunn of $5750 to become effective in September 1968 has made it mandatory 
for Acton to set a salary schedule which will attract and hold the best teachers. Acton also has to compete 
with the other towns in this area for the top teachers. The following is the new salary schedule to become 
effective January 1, 1968. 



Basic Salary Schedule for Teachers 
Effective January 1, 1968 



Steps 


Bachelor's 
Degree 


hours 


Master's Degree 
(Bachelor's plus 
40 hrs. equiv.) 

6,500 
6,800 
7,100 
7,600 

3 hours 


Master's Degree 
plus 30 hours 

7,000 
7,300 
7,600 
8,100 

3 hours 


Doctor's Degree 


1 
2 
3 
4 


6,000 
6,300 
6,600 
7,100 

6 


7,500 
7,800 
8,100 
8, 600 


5 
6 
7 


7,400 
7,700 
8,000 

6 


hours 


7,900 
8,200 
8,500 


i hours 


8,400 
8,700 
9,000 
3 


hours 


8,900 
9,200 
9,500 


8 

9 

10 


8,400 
8,800 
9,200 

6 


hours 


8,900 
9,300 
9,700 


hours 


9,400 
9,800 
10,200 
3 


hours 


9,900 
10,300 
10,700 


11 
12 


9,600 
10,000 




10,100 
10,500 




10,600 
11,000 




11,100 
11,500 



Salary related matters and benefits are: 

1. Advancement on Salary Schedule. Annual step- rate increases become effective in September. 
Dependent on satisfactory service and become effective by vote of the School Committee. 

2. Advancement to Steps 4, 7, 10 on Salary Schedule. Bachelor's Degree: Six semester hour credits 
required in the three years preceding the advance from one unit to the next higher unit. Master's Degree 
and Master's Degree plus thirty hours: Three semester hour credits required in the three years preceding 
the advance from one unit to the next higher unit. 

3. Equivalency. Forty graduate credit hours beyond bachelor degree equivalent to a master's degree 
providing two-thirds of the credit hours are in subject matter fields; advancement must be approved by the 
Superintendent and the School Committee. 

4. Supermaximum. $500.00 after each five years at Salary Schedule maximum. 

5. Sick Leave. Unlimited accumulation at the rate of ten days per year. 

6. Personal Leave. Two days per year non- cumulative. Prior notice must be given to the principal 
involved. 

7. Sabbatical Leave. Every seventh year upon petition and with approval of principal and/or superin- 
tendent prior to grant by School Commiittee. For professional growth through formal education or travel. 
Compensation to be two-thirds of salary. Grantee to serve school systemi two academic years upon return, 
or pay liquidated damages for breach of agreement. 

8. Blue Cross-Blue Shield. One-half cost of premium by employee; one-half by school system. 



26 



9. Group Life Insurance. One-half cost of premium by employee; one-half by school system. 

10. Reimbursement for tuition and fees. The School Committee will reimburse teachers at its discre- 
tion for tuition and fees incurred by such teachers taking courses to upgrade skills and improve proficiency, 
with the following provisos: in order to qualify, the course taken must be approved in advance by the school 
principal and the superintendent of schools, and must be completed with a grade of B- or better; tenure 
teachers are eligible and must be recommended to the School Committee by both the school principal and 
superintendent of schools; an individual teacher may receive reimbursement up to $150. maximum per year. 

11. Credit for experience on Salary Schedule. Teachers coming into the Acton and Acton-Boxborough 
Regional School District school systems may be given credit on the salary scale at the discretion of the super- 
intendent of schools for the following full time teaching experience: in the Military Service, Peace Corps, 
private and public schools and colleges, and U. S. Government dependency schools. 

12. Religious Holidays. The School Committee will provide to those people whose major religious holi- 
days fall on days when school is in session two days annual leave in addition to their sick leave and personal 
leave, these days to be agreed upon after discussion with the salary committee. 

13. Funeral Leave. Three days for death in imxnediate family. 
New State Laws Relating to Education 

1. Chapter 71, Section 46K and 46L. Dyslexia - problems in visual perception. 

2. Chapter 71, Sections 46H and I. A bill to require special education and treatment programs for 
emotionally disturbed children in the public schools of the State. 

3. Chapter 572, Acts of 1965. A mandatory bill for all cities and towns in the Commonwealth to estab- 
lish kindergartens by 1973. 

In the past year the town was saddened by the sudden death of Mr. Ray A. Pillivant, a member of the 
mathematics department in the Regional Junior High School. Mr. Pillivant died while he and his wife were 
visiting in New York on December 9, 1967. Mr. Pillivant was a dedicated and loyal member of the teaching 
profession. He had a great influence on the student body and his loss to the school system is deeply regretted. 

Mrs. Carolyn T. Douglas resigned from the Acton School System on November 17, 1967 to be married 
to Mr. John Peterson. Mrs. Peterson, a native of Acton, was a graduate of Acton High School and became a 
teacher in 1940. For the past eight years she served as Principal of the Florence A. Merriam School. She 
brought to the school system a talent for deep understanding, and a warm and gentle personality. We all wish 
Mrs. Peterson the very best in her new career. 

Mr. Constantine Limberakis, Director of Music for the local and regional schools since September 1958, 
resigned his position on December 31, 1967 to become Music Director in the Somerville Public Schools. In 
the past ten years Mr. Limberakis has built the music department into one of the best, not only in the Common- 
wealth, but in New England. The department has grown continuously and now has eight full time members. 
Mr. Limberakis organized the high school and junior high school bands, the fifth and sixth grade bands, and 
he put on numerous operettas. The annual spring and Christmas concerts were attended by capacity audiences. 

We all wish Mr. Limberakis great success in his new position and we express appreciation for his out- 
standing work in our school systems since 1958. 

Special appreciation is extended to George E. Neagle, who finished his term of office on the School Com- 
mittee this past March. George was a menaber of the original Regional Committee in 1956 which built the 
Regional High School. We all express our sincere thanks to him for his many years on both the Acton- 
Boxborough Regional School Committee and the Acton School Commiittee. 

I cannot end this annual report without expressing my special thanks to those who have helped to make 
this year one of progress and success - to the many Boards in town, especially the Building Committee, which 
has been meeting every Wednesday night with your Superintendent in the continuing program of building and 
equipping elementary schools; to the Selectmen and Finance Committee for their cooperation with the School 
Committee; and, to the Planning Board, Recreation Commission, Land Acquisition Coramittee, Conservation 
Committee, Board of Health and Sidewalk Committee, all of whom have attended meetings with the School Com- 
mittee in an effort to work out mutual or related projects. 

In closing 1 should like to express my appreciation to the School Committees, who have attended so many 
meetings and have given unselfishly of their time and energy. The towns of Acton and Boxborough are indeed 
fortunate in having such dedicated groups working to attain the best education for the children of both towns. 

The administrative and supervisory staff, the classroom teachers, the clerical staff, the custodians and 
bus drivers, all play an important part in our educational processes. To them I am deeply grateful for their 
loyalty and efforts. 

William L. O'Connell 

27 



MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS - 1967 

Acton Public Schools 
Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 

1. New salary schedule and fringe benefits voted by School Committees. See complete schedule and list of 
benefits printed elsewhere in this report. 

2. Appointment of Assistant Superintendent of Schools for curriculum. 

3. Appointment of full time Vice Principals. 

4. Closing of Charter Road during school hours. 

5. Athletics. 

(a) New electric football scoreboard donated by Lions Club. 

(b) Varsity basketball team qualified for Tech Tourney. Final record of twenty victories and two defeats. 

(c) Inauguration of varsity ice hockey team into Dual County League. 

6. Breaking of ground for elementary school on Spruce Street. Occupancy in September 1968. 

7. Purchase of Dunn land, located on Taylor Road and Minot Avenue, for two future elementary schools. 

8. Naming of Elm Street School to "Carolyn T. Douglas School" by School Committee, honoring Principal 
Carolyn T. Douglas's many years of devoted service to the town, the past eight years as Principal of the 
Merriam School. 

PROJECTED ENROLLMENTS 1968-1973 



Year 

1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 



Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 
Junior High (Gr. 7-8) Senior High (Gr. 9-12) 



683 
713 
784 
801 
799 
778 



1107 
1194 
12 97 
1363 
1467 
1514 



Total 

1790 
1907 
2081 
2164 
2266 
2292 



Acton Public Schools 

and 

Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 

Combined Projected Enrollments 1968-1973 



Year 

1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 



Grades 1- 


-6 




2126 






2154 






2126 






2118 






2090 






2130 





Regional School District 

1790 
1907 
2081 
2164 
2266 
22 92 



Total 

3916 
4061 
4207 
4282 
4356 
4422 



AGE AND GRADE DISTRIBUTION TABLE (OCTOBER 1, 1967) 



Entering class of 
1973 1972 1971 1970 1969 1968 
Pre-School 200 245 296 289 352 349 

Grade 1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 
Trainable 
Educable 

Grade 7 



28 



9 
10 
11 
12 



10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 



5 278 


24 
























337 


46 


2 94 
42 

1 


35 

270 

40 

2 


41 

2 92 

49 

2 


1 

42 

235 

36 

2 


6 

40 

242 


37 


1 
2 












375 
354 
380 
325 
317 
7 


2 


1 


1 






1 
43 


221 
36 


1 

33 

2 08 

39 


2 

1 

33 

193 

30 


1 

1 

5 

31 

146 

30 

Re 


6 

34 

163 

28 

;eion 


1 

2 

28 

114 

al Sc 


Elementary 

4 1 
17 1 1 
hool District 


9 
2104 

299 
282 
270 
212 
226 
161 
1450 



Acton Students Only 



3554 



ACTON FACULTY 

William L. O'Connell, Superintendent 
Alan M. White, Assistant Superintendent 



Name 



Alice F. Hayes 
Clara Ballantine 

Patricia Davis 
Margaret DesLauriers 
Judith Dill 
Helen Dooling 
Louise Harzigian 
!= Virginia Holder 
Ann Jacobs 
Karen Madaras 
Marguerite Mazzone 
Lois Nichols 
Therese Scimone 



James Palavras 

Cynthia Abely 
Dorothy Bunker 

i= Linda Butt 
Malah Davis 
Helen de Coste 
Patricia Higgins 
Karen Howard 
Marygail Lynch 

"Margaret Moland 
Alice O'Hearn 
Janet Ray 
Linda Telfer 



Robert C. Conroy 

Helen Gormley 
"Geraldine Healy 

Martha Collins 

Rosemary Connolly 
'-Angela D' Andrea 
'"Elizabeth Kirchhofer 

Stephanie Lambert 
'i=Shiela Lyons 

Rebecca Moore 

Mary Lou Parker 
*Sally Ann Penney 

Janice Redmond 

Rita Roymans 

Barbara Sladkin 
^Margaret Windheim 
•i'Rhoda Brown 

Shirley Brown 

■:<Kay Gibbs 

*Kathy Hofer 
Charlene Imbernino 
Madeleine Kingston 



Professional Training 

McCarthy School 

Fitchburg State College 
Western Reserve University 
Boston University 
Lesley College 
Lowell State College 
University of Massachusetts 
Marymount College 
Lowell State College 
Lowell State College 
University of Minnesota 
Newark State College 
Boston College 
Lowell State College 
Boston College 

Towne School 



Boston University 
Fitchburg State College 
Lowell State College 
Jackson College 
Boston College 
Russell Sage College 
Lesley College 
Lesley College 
Elmira College 
Lowell State College 
University of Massachusetts 
Lowell State College 
Lesley College 
Tufts University 

Douglas School 



Boston College 
Plymouth State 
Framingham State College 
Boston College 
University of Massachusetts 
William Penn College 
Elmira College 
Boston College 
Central Michigan College 
Duke University 
Fitchburg State College 
University of Massachusetts 
Cabrini College 
Lowell State College 
Syracuse University 
University of Massachusetts 
Clark University 
Lowell State College 
Northeastern University 
University of Idaho 
Wichita State University 
Lowell State College 
Fitchburg State College 



Degree 



BS 

BS 

M.Ed. 

BS 

BS 

BA 

BA 

BS 

BS 

BS 

BA 

BS 

BS 

BS 



BA 

M.Ed. 

BA 

AB 

BS 

BS 



BS 
BS 
BS 
BA 
BS, 
BS 
BS 



Grade or Position 



Principal 
1 



M.Ed. 



BS, M. Ed. 

BA 

BS 

BS 

BA 

BA 

BA 

BA 

BA 

BA 

BS 

BA 

BS 

BS 

BS 

BA 

AB 

BA 

M. Ed. 

BS 

BA 

BS 

BS 



Principal 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



Principal 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
4 



*New faculty members as of September, 1967. 



Name 



Carolyn Douglas 
Margaret Barrett 
*Mary Budge 
Jennie Johnson 

Janice Morgan 
Ruth Thompson 
Lynne Alterman 

^Margaret Benoit 
Camilla Chickering 
Mary Lou Denahy 

■'Deborah De Staebler 

'= Carol Jaffe 
Nancy Joslin 

Nancy Lapham 

Salvatore Lipomi 

Sandra Luce 
-Bruce Byam 
*Anne Jones 

Barbara Parker 

Louise Piper 

Susan Shea 



James Palavras 

Joan Beck 

Geraldine Farrell 
Julie McEnaney 
Nancy Nizel 
Doris Peterson 
Edwin Zwicker 



Ruth Proctor 

Ada Cameron 

Shiela Groman 

Leonore Kahn 
Juta Moter 

^'Elizabeth Witzel 

Constantine Limberakis 
Jeanne Haskell 
Arnold Radel 
George Revelas 
Margot Romberg 

•=Diane Scourtas 
■'Linda Hern 

Patricia Kinney 

Edward Leary 

Gladys Mason 

Judith Gunner 
''Janet Heutink 

Richard Marion 

Phyllis Foss 

Agnes Manning 

Sally Strangman 



Degree 



Professional Training 

Merriam School 

Fitchburg State College 
Lowell State College 
Lowell State College 
Lowell State College 
Harvard University 
Fitchburg State College 
Lesley College 
Goucher College 
Russell Sage College 
Lesley College 
Emmanuel College 
Boston University 
Elmira College 
Mount Holyoke College 
Boston University 
Lake Erie College 
Boston University 
Lowell State College 
Tufts College 
Muskingham College 
Lowell State College 
Wellesley College 
Boston University 
Westfield State College 
Bates College 



Grades Housed in Acton-Boxborough Junior High School 



Grade or Position 



BS 




Principal 


BS 




4 


BS 




4 


BS 




4 


M.Ed. 






BS, M 


Ed. 


4 


BS 




4 


BA 




5 


BS 




5 


BS 




5 


BA 




5 


BS 




5 


BA 




5 


AB 




5 


M.Ed. 






BA 




5 


BS 




5 


M.Ed. 






BS 




5 


BS 




6 


BA 




6 


BS, M. 


Ed. 


6 


BS 




6 


AB 




6 



Boston University 
Fitchburg State 
Wellesley College 
Tufts University 
Emmanuel College 
Lesley College 
Boston University 
Bridgewater State College 
Boston University 

SPECIAL FIELDS 

Radcliffe College 

Boston University 

Boston University 

Salem State College 

Humboldt State 

University of Pittsburgh 

Brooklyn College 

Wellesley College 

Harvard School of Education 

Purdue University 

Indiana University 

Boston University 

Anna Maria College 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Lowell State College 

Eastman School of Music 

Northwestern University 

Lowell State College 

Boston University 

Boston University 

Boston University 

Tufts University 

Tufts University 

Emmanuel College 

Massachusetts College of Art 

Fitchburg State College 

Salem State College 

Rhode Island School of Design 

Lesley College 



BA 

M.Ed. 

AB 

M. Ed. 

AB 

BS 

AB 

BS 

BS 



AB 

M. Ed. 

BS 

M.Ed. 

BA 

M.Ed. 

AB, MA 

BA 

M.Ed. 

BS 

MS 

BM 

BA 

BM 

BS 

BM 

MM 

BA 

BS 

BS 

BS 

BS 

BS 

BA 

BS 

BS 

BS 

BFA 

EDM 



Principal 

6 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

Director of Guidance 

Guidance 

Guidance 

Guidance 
Guidance 

Guidance 

Director of Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Reading 

Reading 

Reading 



30 



Name 
Suzenne Kissell 

'■Joyce Williams 
Nadine Yates 
Joan Hilton 

i- Linda Wright 



Professional Training 

Stonehill College 

Lesley College 

Lesley College 

Washington State University 

Moravian College 

Houghton College 



Degree 



Grade or Position 



AB 




Trainable Class 


M.Ed. 


.Sp. Ed. 




BS 




Educable Class 


BS 




Speech Therapy 


BA 




French 


BA 




French 



ACTON-BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT FACULTY 



William O. O'Connell, Superintendent 
Alan M. White, Assistant Superintendent 



Acton-Boxborough Junior High School 



Arthur Hayes 



Henry Wall 

Judith Adams 
:=Elizabeth Alt , 

George Balf 
'=Nancy Benson 
Frank Blomberg 

John Brodie 
Mary Campbell 
■=Mary Ann Christeson 
Robert Coan 

W. T. Cummings 

■'Mary Derby 

Helen Detsch 
"Anita Dodson 

Jeanne Dunlap 
■'Robert Fedele 

Joseph Flagg 

Anita Finkelstein 
Joan Goldthwaite 
■'Dale Grouf 

Richard Gunzelmann 
Francis Holahan 
Bert Hubley 
Karen Jokissari 
Mason King 

•'Peter Larson 
■'William LeBoeuf 
Constantine Limberakis 
■'Courtney MacLachlan 

Daniel Madden, Jr. 

Christine Manning 
Juta Moter 

■'Leslie Mould 

■'Evelyn Neuberger 
Ray Pillivant 

Ruth Proctor 

Arnold Radel 
George Revelas 



University of Mississippi 

Stanford University 

Harvard University 

Salem State College 

Boston University 

Marietta College 

Wells College 

University of Lousanne 

Boston University 

Wells College 

Springfield College 

University of Massachusetts 

Boston State College 

Immaculata College 

Indiana University 

Boston College 

Harvard School of Education 

Massachusetts School of Art 

Yale University 

Mount St. Mary College 

Boston University 

University of Connecticut 

University of Connecticut 

Emerson College 

Mass. Institute of Technology 

Boston State College 

Queens College of New York 

University of Massachusetts 

Skidmore College 

Tufts University 

Fitchburg State College 

Fitchburg State College 

University of Massachusetts 

University of Massachusetts 

Mass. Institute of Technology 

Harvard University 

Boston State 

Dartmouth College 

Boston University 

Wellesley College 

Salem State 

Suffolk University 

Boston College 

Jackson College 

Wellesley College 

Harvard School of Education 

Simmons College 

Boston University 

George Washington University 

U. S. Military Academy 

George Washington University 

Radcliffe College 

Boston University 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Lowell State College 



BA 

MA 

AM 

BS 

M.Ed. 

BA 

BA 

Certificate 

BM 

BA 

BS 

M.Ed. 

BS 

AB 

BME 

BA 

MAT 

BFA 

MFA 

BA 

BS, M. Ed. 

BA 

BS 

BM 

BS 

M. Ed. 

BA 

BS 

BA 

Ed.M. 

BS 

BS 

BS 

BS 

BS 

AM 

BS 

BA 

BM 

BA 

M.Ed. 

AB 

M.Ed. 

AB 

BA 

M.Ed. 

BS 

M.Ed. 

AB 

BS 

MA 

AB 

M.Ed. 

BM 

BS 



Principal 



Vice-Principal 

English 
Languages 

Instrumental Music 
Languages 
Social Studies 

Science 
Social Studies 
Music 
Social Studies 

Art 

Home Economics 

Librarian 

Reading 

Home Economics 

Music 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Science 

English 

Industrial Arts 

Industrial Arts 

Science 

Physical Education 

Mathematics 

Social Studies 
Science 

Director of Music 
Social Studies 

Guidance Counselor 

English 

Guidance Counselor 

Guidance Counselor 

English 
Mathematics 

Director of Guidance 

Music 
Music 



31 



Name 

Robert Rooney 
■•Donald Saulnier 

Kathryn Schleicher 
"Anne Sleeper 

Frank Soracco 
Albert Stonkus 



Raymond Grey 

Donald MacLeod 
-Gail Adley 

Janice Bacon 
:=Elizabeth''Ball 

Barbara Berenberg 

Charles Battit 
'=Janie Bernstein 

Margaret Boornazian 
■■Sheila Bostick 
Edward Boyden 
Frances Boyle 

Daniel Boylen 
■'John Brown 

■'Edward Buswick 

Robert Clever 
"Margaret Cullen 

James Dadoly 

Martha Deraney 
■'Lynne Dillingham 

Thomas Dowd 
Gerald Duggan 
Geraldine Fisher 
Joanne Garduno 

James Gifford 
Charles Gittins, Jr. 

^'Marcia Green 

■'Elaine Kahan 

■=Susan Kaplovitz 
Mary Keefe 

Constantine Limberakis 
Pamela Madore 
Robert Mahoney 
Mary Marcucci 
Lawrence McNulty 
Robert Morris 
Juta Moter 

Patricia O'Hearn 

Carol Olmsted 
Nancy Ousley 
William Petkewich 

Jacqueline Phaneuf 

Francis Pratt 



Ruth Proctor 
George Proulx 



Professional Training Degree 



Boston College 
Boston State College 
Colgate University 
Goucher College 
Endicott Junior College 
American University 
Boston University 
Boston University 



Acton-Boxborough Regional High School 



Tufts University 

Boston University 

Merrimack College 

Smith College 

University of Wichita 

Brandeis University 

Boston University 

University of Wisconsin 

Brown University 

Burdett College 

University of California 

University of Vermont 

Framingham State College 

Simmons College 

Boston University 

University of Massachusetts 

University of Vermont 

University of Massachusetts 

University of Illinois 

Tufts University 

American International College 

Harvard University 

Boston University 

Upsala College 

Tufts University 

Harvard College 

Salem State College 

University of New Hampshire 

Radcliffe College 

Simmons College 

Springfield College 

University of Massachusetts 

Russell Sage College 

Jackson College 

Mount Holyoke College 

Emmanuel College 

University of Pennsylvania 

Boston University 

Salem State College 

Lowell Technological Institute 

Emmanuel College 

Boston University 

Boston University 

Wellesley College 

Harvard University 

Regis College 

Boston College 

Middlebury College 

Fitchburg State College 

Salem State College 

Boston University 

Lowell State College 

University of New Hampshire 

Eastern Nazarene College 

Harvard University 

University of the Americas 

Radcliffe College 

Boston University 

Saint Anselm's College 

Assumption College 



Position or Subject 



BS 


Mathematics 


BS 

N.D.E.A. 


Languages 


AB 

AS 


English 
Art 


BA 




BA, M. Ed. 


Science 


BS 


Physical Education 



AB, MS 


Principal 


AB, M. Ed. 


Vice- Principal 


AB 


English 


BA 


Mathematics 


BA 


Languages 


BA 


English 


BA 


Science 


BA 


Languages 


MAT 






Business 


AB 


Science 


BSME 


Industrial Arts 


BS 


Home Economics 


MS 




BS, M.Ed. 


Physical Education 


BA 


Head of English 


MA 




BA 


English 


AB, M. Ed. 


Guidance 


AB 


Languages 


BA 


Head of Science 


M.Ed. 




BS, M. Ed. 


Guidance 


BA 


English 


MAT 




BA 


Science 


BS 


Business 


BA 


Languages 


AB 


Librarian 


MS 




BS 


Social Studies 


BA 


Science 


BA 


English 


BS 


Mathematics 


BA 


Languages 


AB 


Head of Mathematics 


MS. Ed. 




BM 


Director of Music 


BS 


English 


BS 


Mathematics 


BA 


Art 


BA, M.Ed. 


Social Studies 


BA, MA 


Head of Languages 


BA 


Guidance Counselor 


M.Ed. 




BA 


Languages 


MA 




BA 


Science 


BS 


Mathematics 


BS 


Head Gmdance 


M.Ed. 


Counselor 


BS 


Languages 


MA 




BS 


Head of Social 


M.Ed. 


Studies 


MA 




AB 


Director of Guidance 


M.Ed. 




BA 


Guidance Coiuiselor 



32 



Name 

Arnold Radel 
■'Florence Richman 

Francis Riley 

George Revelas 
"Rosalie Ripaldi 

Rebecca Roberts 

''Virginia Sawyer 
Phyllis Shaw 
Martin Sleeper 

*Winslow Smith 

■'Joan Snyder 

Isadore Stearns 
Audrey Stein 

Ralph Stetson 
Frances Stonkus 
Richard Terry 
■'Mary Wakeford 
Elizabeth Washburn 



Professional Training 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Radcliffe College 

Boston College 

Lowell State College 

Brandeis University 

University of Maine 

Harvard University 

Smith College 

Jackson College 

Williams College 

Harvard University 

Princeton University 

Clark University 

State College 

University of Dijon 

University of Maine 

Barnard College, Columbia Univ. 

Teachers College, Columbia Univ. 

Northeastern University 

Emmanuel College 

Holy Cross College 

University of New Rochelle 

Wellesley College 

Harvard University 



Degree 



Position or Subject 



BM 


Music 


AB 


Reading 


BS 


Mathematics 


BS 


Music 


AB 


Social Studies 


BA 


Languages 


MAT 




BA 


English 


AB 


English 


AB 


Social Studies 


MAT 




AB 


Social Studies 


M. Ed. 




BS, MA 


Social Studies 


Certificate 




BS 


Physical Education 


BA 


Mathematics 


MA 






Mechanical Drawing 


BA 


Science 


BS 


Social Studies 


BA 


Science 


BA 


English 


MAT 





TEACHER RESIGNATIONS 



Name 



Grade or Position 



Reason 



Acton Public Schools 



Austin, Catherine 
Bongiovanni, Judith 
Davies, Susan 
Desmarais, Linda 
Falb, Marcia 
Geikie, Ann 
Gerber, Pearl 
Harvey, Carol 
Herbst, Kay 
Katz, Myrna 
Kinney, Rayda 
Lewis, Margery 
Loosigian, Thalia 
MacLeod, Marlene 
Natoli, Cynthia 
Pirrello, Mary 
Roche, Joan 
Soracco, Sara-Ann 
Theodore, Angela 
Wrigley, Janet 



5 
3 

4 

2 
Guidance 
Phys. Ed. 

5 

3 

5 

3 

2 

2 

3 

4 

6 

4 

3 

5 

2 
Guidance 



Senior Resident, Radcliffe College 

Married. 

At home. 

At home. 

Move to New Jersey. 

At home. 

Married. 

At home. 

Tour Europe. 

Move to New York 

Move to Indiana 

At home. 

At home. 

At home. 

Married. 

Move to Mississippi. 

At home. 

At home. 

Attend graduate school. 

Return to her home in Quincy, Massachusetts. 



Regional School District 



Junior High School 



Bernbach, Ruth 
Feldman, Eleanor 
Harding, Linda 
Kaplan, Ronna 
Kelley, Theodora 
Pecci, Thomas 
Pederson, Pamela 
Roberts, Julia 
Robins, Lesley 
Sawyer, Beverly 
Thorpe, Margaret 
Wheeler, Inese 



Art 
Languages 

Music 

Languages 

Social Studies 

Science 

English 

Reading 

English 

Home Ec. 

Social Studies 

Social Studies 



Accept position in Waltham Schools. 

Travel abroad. 

Accept position in Newton Schools. 

Attend graduate school. 

Move to Cohasset, Massachusetts. 

Enter business field. 

Married and move to Vermont. 

Move to Oregon. 

Move to New Jersey 

Accept position in Medway, Massachusetts. 

At home. 

Move to Long Island. 



33 



Name 



Grade or Position 



Reason 



Senior High School 



Briggs, Karen 
Drumheller, Betty 
Duwe, Ann 
Foresman, Alan 
Friedman, Arlene 
Heitman, Estelle 
McAllister, Antoinette 
Newell, Richard 
Quint, Barbara 
Vattes, Caroline 
Vigneron, Alan 
Wolin, Steven 
Wyckoff, Anne 



Social Studies 

English 

English 

Vice Principal 

Languages 

English 

Languages 

Ind. Arts 

English 

Art 

English 

Languages 

Mathematics 



At home. 

Move to Seattle, Washington. 

Move to California. 

Accept principalship in Ashby, Massachusetts. 

Study for doctorate. 

Move to New York 

At home. 

Accept position in New Salem, Massachusetts. 

Married. 

Study for doctorate. 

Peace Corps. 

Graduate school. 

At home. 



REPORT OF THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

I am pleased to submit herewith my annual report as Principal of the Acton-Boxborough Regional High 
School. 

The enrollment of the Senior High School continues to expand. In September 1966, we started school 
with 860 students. September 1967 enrollment figures were as follows: 



Grade 9 


3 07 


10 


235 


11 


254 


12 


177 


Total 


973 students 



It is significant to note that we shall graduate 179 (the number of seniors as of December 1, 1967) and 
we have 307 in grade 9. This is a difference of 128 pupils and indicates clearly the population growth of the 
Senior High School, for in the near future we shall have classes of 300 or more students. In fact, we are in 
the process of planning for an enrollment of 1120 students for September 1968. 

The Senior High School has the capacity to handle 1000 pupils, therefore, in the year 1967 we had the 
necessary space to perform our educational function in an efficient manner. 

We established the following aims in 1967: 

1. Improvement of the Business Education Program - (a) To accomplish this we initiated a project for 
Vocational Federal Funds as provided under the Vocational Education Act of 1963, (Public Law 88-210). The 
project was approved and with matching funds from the Regional High School we purchased I. B. M. Dictation 
Laboratory Equipment; (b) a Business Club was established by Mr. Gerald Duggan, a memiber of the depart- 
ment, in an effort to generate interest and to plan visits to business firms in the area. The cooperation of 
the business firms has been most gratifying. The students from the Business Department are also perform- 
ing many clerical duties for the teachers and department chairmen; (c) the purchase of new electric type- 
writers, duplicating machine and new texts has helped to innprove this department. 

2. We established grouping within the College Preparatory Courses. The use of the computer services 
at the New England Educational Data Services has made this an easier task to perform. 

3. An experimental program in team teaching was initiated in the Science Department. The large group 
teaching is being done with four chemistry classes meeting as one large class then breaking down into smaller 
sections for laboratory and reviews. 

4. Our athletic teams have made their mark in Dual County League competition. The highlight of the 
athletic year was our basketball team capturing the Dual County League crown and their participation in the 
State basketball tournament. We initiated a varsity hockey team and they are now competing in league com- 
petition. 

New citizens of Acton and Boxborough often wonder if the Regional High School is accredited. The 
Senior High School is fully accredited by the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 
This accredits schools and colleges in the six New England states. Membership in one of the six regional 
accrediting associations in the United States indicates that the school or college has been carefully evaluated 
and found to meet the standards agreed upon by qualified educators. Colleges support the efforts of public 
school and community officials to have their secondary school meet the standards of membership. 



34 



It is our goal to create in the Regional High School an academic atmosphere which will make it possible 
for the students to achieve in the best possible manner. We realize at all times that this atmosphere is 
achieved because we are fortunate to have the support of an excellent student body and their parents. The 
support of Mr. William L. O'Connell, Superintendent of Schools, and the School Committee is sincerely 
appreciated. The dedication of the teachers, guidance staff, secretaries, custodians, and cafeteria person- 
nel is recognized and appreciated. Their day-by-day contributions help to produce an efficient school for 
the students. 

Raymond J. Grey 

REPORT OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

Students and faculty members at the Junior High School were profoundly shocked and saddened at the 
sudden death on December 9, 1967, of Mr. Ray Pillivant. 

A graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point and a former career Army officer, 
Mr. Pillivant retired young to prepare himself for what proved to be a very successful career teaching math- 
ematics to young people. He will be greatly missed by students and colleagues alike. 

I am pleased to submit herewith my second annual report as Principal of the Acton-Boxborough Junior 
High School. 

Enrollment School Year 1967-1968 

Grade Septemiber October November December January 

7 336 336 338 337 338 

8 313 313 314 313 312 

The New York Times of October 3, 1967, cited Fort Lauderdale, Florida and Acton, Massachusetts as 
the only two communities in the United States having complete educational parks. This concept, formulated 
many years ago by Superintendent of Schools, Mr. William O'Connell, enables the Acton schools to share its 
buildings, libraries, and faculty on a Grade 1 through 12 basis. 

The Junior High School presently shares its facilities with Grade 6 and the High School but with new' 
facilities such as the expanding film and record library it can often loan appropriate teaching aids to all 
grades. The emphasis here then is on books, materials, and a teaching approach designed to have a strong 
appeal for students between the ages of 12 and 15. 

The junior high school years are crucial for the developing adolescent in that he builds his foundation 
for further studies either on bedrock or on sand. The scholastic emphasis is necessarily placed on sound 
attainments in reading, writing, and mathematics while the moral emphasis, often more important than books, 
is placed on respect, reason, and responsibility. 

Modern books and methods that have been tried and found worthwhile in other solid school systems are 
adopted. Change for the sake of change and faddism are avoided. 

The Junior High School has concentrated on the creation of a purely honors curriculum so that the naore 
important work of presenting a challenging course of studies for average students may begin with dispatch. 

Students in Grade 7 must take five periods weekly of English, French (to be required in 1968-69), math- 
ematics, science, and geography. This course of study requires 25 class periods out of the 35 available. 
The other ten periods are divided between physical education, music, art, woodworking, cooking, sewing. 
Most students will have two periods weekly of study halls, for the trend in the Junior High School is to con- 
sign study periods to the realm of the dodo. 

Students in Grade 8 will be required to take 5 periods weekly of French or Spanish, mathematics, 
science and United States history. Minor subjects required may be taken in physical education, mechanical 
drawing, art, music, cooking, dressmaking. Grade 8 girls often choose to participate in wood or metalwork- 
ing courses and may, if they choose, take a course in mechanical drawing along with art. Here also, study 
halls will be reduced to two periods weekly. 

A. English - Honors students are now using The Roberts English Series which combines writing, in 
particular the sound and spelling relationship, the nature of syntax, literature and linguistics all in one 
enthralling book. 

Each Roberts course has an accompanying set of records containing readings by well-known dramatic 
artists. For example, in the Grade 8 recordings Dorothy Stickney reads Elizabeth Bis'hop's "The Fish", 
Walter Abel reads Shakespeare's "King Richard's Speech" and Rosecoe Lee Browne reads John Masefield's 
"A Ballad of John Silver". 



35 



Regular English sections use an outstanding grammar book, Christ's Handbook of English and outstand- 
ing anthologies of literature. New Trails (Grade 7) and Wide Horizons (Grade 8). 

A drama workshop, the A-B Jay Players, will present in the spring of 1968 R. L. Sweeney's one act 
play. The Hangman's Loose. 

B. Languages - The language laboratory was used this year not only with Audio-Lingual methods but 
with the new text. Speaking French . This new book, which stresses reading and writing in French, was tried 
in Grade 8 honors French classes which meet five periods weekly. 

The new book will be standard for nearly all Grade 7 and 8 French sections next year if present plans 
to make French a major subject come to pass. The tapes that go with Speaking French stress the audio- 
lingual aspects and supplementary materials such as the French folk songs Ecouter et Chanter and Alice 
Langellier's charming little reader Chenain Faisant . 

For students who take the study of foreign languages seriously, a new pilot course in junior high Spanish 
will be opened. This class will be limited to 2 5 students who have made satisfactory grades in French. Com.- 
plete Spanish tapes, records, and readers will also be provided for this group. 

C. The Library - Aided by yearly Federal grants and a substantial appropriation by the local School 
Committee, the Junior High School library collects worthwhile films, tapes, recordings, and photographs to 
enhance its rapidly growing book collection. 

Mrs. Detsch, the librarian, has been careful to order all books listed in the bibliographies of the Eng- 
lish and social studies books. Plans are now underway to include all books on science and technology that are 
cited in the bibliographies of the science texts used at this school. 

The smaller Faculty Library is also growing with the constant addition of files of scholarly journals and 
books of importance in the subject areas of teachers. The two libraries together constitute a very effective 
force for research and general reading so that teachers may continue to grow in knowledge and students may 
become more responsible in preparing themselves for high school. 

D. Mathematics - Modern mathematics is now taught to all Grade 7 and Grade 8 students. This is the 
Laidlaw series of modern mathematical studies bearing the titles Mathematics 7 and Mathematics 8. Honors 
students in Grade 7 are a year ahead of their classmates and take Mathematics 8 so that they can take Dolciani's 
Modern Algebra in Grade 8. 

There are at present no remedial or traditional sections of mathematics in the Junior High School, but 
consideration is being given to the fact that such sections may be beneficial for some students now in residence. 

E. Science - Grade 7 honors students were this year introduced to the new Earth Science Curriculum 
Project (ESCP) which is the first step in required honors science courses that terminate with college-level 
physics in senior high school. A complete prospectus on this course may be obtained by calling Mr. Janaes 
Dadoly, Chairman of the Department of Science at the High School. 

The new course emphasizes the earth's motion and magnetism, meteorology, geology, and astronomy. 
The source book. Investigating the Earth, was sponsored by and seen through the press by the American 
Geological Institute and the National Science Foundation. 

Grade 8 honors students go on to Introductory Physical Science (I.P.S.) a demanding course which exam- 
ines the nature of matter. This course naturally requires a high degree of mathematical proficiency. 

The experiments and equipment used in the courses described are carried on through the standard 
science sections. The filtering down process thus enhances the whole Junior High School science curriculum 
which is based on three excellent volumes known as Science Problems I, II, and III. 

It is hoped that another physical science course, less demanding than I.P.S., can be given in 1968-69. 
This course, I.M.E. ( Interaction of Matter and Energy) , was given with great success in Yuba City, California, 
public schools and the Newman Junior High in Dedham, Massachusetts. It is well within the capabilities of 
serious science students. The text (paper-bound) permits students to mark passages and make mar^ift'al 
notes. At the end of the course the text will be presented to the student as a memento and valuable reference 
source. 

F. Social Studies - Sol Holt's World Geography and You a nd Wilder, Ludlum and Brown's This IS 
America's Story (Grade 8) were vastly enhanced this year by the use of the Encyclopedia Brittannica film- 
strips on geography and the United States history. The sound filmstrip projectors now in use will enable the 
department to use the new National Geographic films on world geography and American studies as they become 
available. 

Grade 8 honors students were divided into two tutorial sections of 15 students each and supplied with a 
new book. Discovering American History. This new approach was exhaustively tested in the Amherst Regional 
School System and stresses the historian's approach to the study of history, comparison and analyses of events 

36 



in lieu of the traditional memorization and regurgitation. The Profiles in Courage film series will be added 
to the U. S. History curriculum as soon as is practicable. 

Obviously, few of the educational advances described in this report would have been possible without 
the solid support of Superintendent of Schools, William L. O'Connell and a forward looking School Committee. 

I am particularly indebted to Vice Principal Wall and the faculty members teaching in the Junior High 
School. Without them and the strong support of the guidance staff, the secretarial staff, the cafeteria staff, 
and the custodial staff, it would not be possible for the school to function. Finally, I am sure that all admin- 
istrative, faculty and staff members join me in observing that we are fortunate in having as students a very 
interesting and rewarding group. 

Arthur J. Hayes 

PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

In September 1966 the responsibility for coordinating all of the pupil personnel services was assigned 
to the Guidance Department. I did not feel ready at this time a year ago to report adequately on the helping 
services other than guidance and counseling. Now, with the assistance of all of the specialists involved, I 
offer a summary of the current status of each of the services. 

GUIDANCE 



In my 1965 and 1966 reports, I attempted to express a philosophy of guidance for the local schools and 
to describe in detail the history and development of our program in the elementary grades and the junior and 
senior high schools. Now, instead of restating my own thoughts, I should like to quote below a few statements 
of members of the Guidance Department concerning the counseling program and the role and activities of the 
counselor. I believe that all of us concur with the thoughts expressed by the individual counselors. 

The Counseling Program 

"The counseling program is a vital part of today's modern school system. A counseling program should 
bring benefits to both the students and the faculty. Counseling can help the student better understand himself, 
gain insight into his own behavior, and, if necessary, redirect his energy and enthusiasm to more meaningful 
and acceptable activities and behavior. Counseling can help faculty members to see the individual child in a 
different light, to obtain new ideas in working with a particular student, and to 'teach' the student more 
effectively. " 

"Guidance is another medium of communication between home and school. Because the schedule of the 
counselor is more flexible than that of the classroom teacher, she is able to be more immediately available 
for contact with parents. She is in regular communication with the classroom teacher and is aware of the 
child's progress. She is able to gather information from many sources in order to try to understand each 
individual child." 

"All children encounter some stresses or problems that come normally with each stage of growth in a 
child's lifetime. Learning to cope with such stresses as they occur in varying degrees in school is, for the 
child, a part of the total learning process. He needs to see himself as a person who can deal with situations 
adequately and to learn positively from then in order to prepare for a future that is, by all evidences, becom- 
ing more complex. For this reason counseling should begin early and be continuous." 

The Counselor's Role 

"The counselor is NOT a disciplinarian, clerk, head shrinker, or magician. He cannot perform mira- 
cles. He can offer an accepting and supporting relationship to an individual who is having difficulty and who 
wants to overcome it. The school counselor is an adult who has a keen interest in the students. Hopefully, 
the students realize this and will take advantage of the counseling program to help them become better 
adjusted students and citizens of our society." 

"Counselors have been placed in the school system only to help children. Parents need not fear that 
their child will tell something about the family that might be embarrassing. A counselor is a professional 
person who is ethically bound not to repeat what a child has told. Conversations between child and counselor 
are confidential. This trust often brings the basis of a problem to the fore and makes it easier to solve." 

"Going to the counselor is not a sign that a child is abnormal. All counselors plan to see all the chil- 
dren assigned to them each year. In this way they let the child know that there is a particular person in the 
school whose primary function is to be available at all times to listen and help. " 

"Environment has considerable influence upon a child's self-concept and behavior. The counselor as 
one of those involved in the total educational program can often help to effect changes in the environment 
which will be beneficial to the child." 



37 



"Counselors, though consulted, are not the policy-makers of the school. Their role is to make known 
to a student what alternatives are open to him within the existing structure of the school and the larger society 
of which he is a part and then to assist him in learning to decide for himself, by carefully weighing the altern- 
atives in light of his interests and abilities, which path to pursue." 

"As a student progresses from the elementary level to the secondary level, the points of emphasis and 
counselor involvement in various activities change. Because the student is increasingly reponsible for him- 
self, his actions and his decisions, the counselor's emphasis begins to shift accordingly to spending greater 
portions of his time in consulting with individual students and lesser portions of his time with teachers and 
parents. However, these other activities still retain much importance in helping to achieve the over-all edu- 
cational goals of the school and the individuals that it involves." 

"Although 1 see myself, as a high school counselor, as primarily concerned with educational and voca- 
tional planning, 1 am always concerned with the total person and his well being and therefore 1 very often 
function as 'personal' counselor to the degree that I feel capable of doing so - offering support and encourage- 
ment and sometimes pointing to further steps that might be taken by the student to improve a situation." 

The Counselor's Activities 

"An average day for a school counselor may include: several conferences with students, several con- 
ferences with teachers and remedial specialists, one or more conferences with a parent, principal, or fellow 
counselor; a classroom visitation, researching information concerning particular students, several telephone 
conversations with: the school nurse, referral agencies, or parents; writing summaries of interviews and 
keeping records, evaluating the progress of students, and attending a professional meeting." 

1967 was a year of growth rather than change in the guidance program of the Acton Public Schools and 
the Acton-Boxborough Regional School District. Certain activities and developments deserve particular note, 
as follows: 

1. Placement of the Class of 1967, ABRHS 

Class size: 165 

Colleges and specialized schools: 80% 
Service and civilian occupations: 20% 

2. Additional Personnel 



In order to maintain the 300:1 pupil- counselor ratio at the secondary level, one additional- counselor 
was appointed to the Junior High School staff. 

In the Acton Public Schools, we were authorized by the School Committee to appoint additional 
counselors so that we might have one counselor for every 400 pupils. However, two unexpected resignations 
in the summer - one due to illness, the other to a death in the family - left us faced with the task of hiring 
replacements. Qualified personnel were difficult to find at that time. Consequently, when school opened 
with an enrollment in grades 1-6 of 2066 students, we had only four counselors. Thus, although we are pro- 
viding some service in every school, we have not been able to reach our objective of having a counselor see 
every child at least once during the school year. All children in grades 2, 4, and 6 will be seen during the 
current year. In grades 1, 3, and 5 counselors are working only with those pupils referred by teachers or 
parents because they are experiencing some difficulties. 

3. Professional Meetings 

Regularly scheduled department meetings have helped to maintain communication among counselors 
at all levels and continuity and consistency in program. Individual members or study committees have led 
discussions on a variety of topics including the counselor's role, evaluation of the counseling program, curri- 
culum, grouping, testing, learning disabilities. At one meeting in the fall a specialist from a hospital clinic 
addressed the counselors, and other school personnel invited for the occasion, on the subject of dyslexia. 

Our counselors are active members of the West Suburban Guidance Association, an organization of 
school counselors representing about twenty communities in this area, and of the Massachusetts School Coun- 
selors Association. 

The department is represented also at many other educational conferences occurring during the year 
and concerned with such subjects as mental health, retardation, learning disabilities, curriculum development, 
and college admissions. 

' 4. Liberty Council 

Three members of the Department are on Liberty Council committees studying the needs of the 
area and investigating the possibility of regional programs for retarded and emotionally disturbed children 
and children with perceptual handicaps. 



38 



5. Case Conferences 

Plans have recently been finalized for periodic consultation and case study between a psychiatrist 
from Walden Clinic and high school counselors from three member towns. Meetings will be held every two 
weeks and will begin in January. 

6. Supervision of Programs 

Named Head Counselor in September 1966, Mr. Petkewich continues in this capacity and assists 
with the administration of the special service programs as follows: the counseling program in the Junior 
High School, group testing for grades 1-12, the educable and trainable special classes, the Junior High School 
programs for students needing remedial reading and for those needing tutorial instruction because of percep- 
tual handicaps. 

HEALTH 



The health personnel for all of the schools consist of two registered nurses and one secretary who 
administers first aid and assists with the vision and hearing testing. The nurses visit all of the schools and 
the special classes every day and they are always on call in case of emergency. They are also available for 
conferences with teachers, counselors, and parents and they devote some time to clerical duties, including 
keeping health records. 

(Please see also the nurses' own reports for listing of specific activities during 1967.) 

REMEDIAL READING 

Two teachers in the Acton Public Schools and one in the Junior High School offer instruction to pupils 
who need special assistance in developing basic reading skills. Unfortunately, a qualified reading specialist 
for the High School was not found for this year. 

A survey of reading needs in the elementary grades was made last fall and a review of the results indi- 
cated that the two available teachers could provide the greatest help this year by concentrating their efforts 
in grades 1-3. 

One of our teachers says, "In today's society it is imperative that people learn to read as much and as 
well as possible. As a child progresses through school, reading becomes the most important facet of com- 
munication leading to success. The child must be taught to read skillfully so that he can do all of his other 
school subjects." 

In the primary grades the goal of the reading specialists is to find as early as possible those pupils who 
are not participating profitably in their classroom reading programs and to provide for them additional small 
group instruction. The screening procedure includes review of referral forms completed by classroom 
teachers or counselors, study of school records, and the administration of standardized diagnostic tests. 
Because the nature and degree of a reading disability vary among children, every effort is made to determine 
the specific problems of each child. Those pupils found to be in need of special help are then grouped accord- 
ing to their difficulties and given thirty- minute periods of instruction several times a week. 

Phonics, spelling, penmanship, vocabulary, syllabication, sound discrimination, comprehension skills, 
oral and silent reading are stressed. Much use is made of audio-visual aids and other materials supplement- 
ing those used in the classroom. One of the teachers reports, "We are fortunate in having reading machines 
such as a tachistoscope, filmstrip projector, language master and overhead projector. All of these help to 
vary the work and keep a high interest level. Many games and devices help to make consistent daily drill and 
repetition more interesting. Our library consists of over three hundred books which have a high interest 
appeal but a limited reading vocabulary. It helps to eliminate frustration and give the child a sense of achieve- 
ment. " 

Children may be referred for remedial reading at any time during the year and they leave the program 
as soon as they show satisfactory progress. Thereafter, the reading specialists follow up through periodic 
discussions with the classroom teachers. 

In the Junior High School small group instruction is offered to seventh and eighth graders who are read- 
ing below their grade levels. The selection process is similar to that used in the elementary grades. Reading 
groups meet twice a week during activity or study periods and much individual attention is offered. 

The Junior High School reading teacher states the objectives of her program as follows: 

1. To help each pupil recognize his own reading needs, his present abilities, and to correct poor 
reading habits. 



39 



2. To help the pupil understand that reading needs vary with the type of materials read. 

3. To develop the ability to shift reading rate according to the type of material and purpose. 

4. To increase comprehension. 

5. To increase vocabulary. 

6. To develop study skills and habits. 

7. To increase proficiency in spelling. 

8. To widen the scope of reading interests. 

PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN WITH DYSLEXIA 

Initiated in September 1967 were two pilot programs - one in the Acton Public Schools, the other in the 
Region - designed to help children handicapped by perceptual difficulties. Two teachers with specialized 
training were appointed and they are offering tutorial instruction to twenty-six pupils diagnosed prior to this 
school year as having dyslexia. 

One of the teachers has answered two commonly asked questions as follows: 

"What is a dyslexic child? 

"For many years teachers have puzzled over the child who, despite normal or high intelligence, is 
unable to learn to read or may have unusual difficulty with spelling and penmanship. Many of these children 
may be diagnosed as having dyslexia or a specific language disability. Children with dyslexia have many 
things in common: many are left-handed or ambidextrous; most of them are boys; most were late in learning 
to walk and talk; they usually do well in arithmetic and do poorly in the total language areas. 

However, it is difficult to describe a typical dyslexic child. In reading, he often has a severe tendency 
to reverse letters, syllables and words. He has great difficulty in associating sounds and letters. This 
causes trouble in his efforts to spell. Sometimes the letters themselves are reversed; sometimes letters are 
omitted or inserted; or, the letters may all be there but jumbled up; or, maybe the letters have very little 
relationship to those in the word to be spelled. Most dyslexics have difficulty with the fine motor control 
demanded in handwriting. Some of them have poor gross motor coordination and lack a sense of rhythm so 
that they appear awkward to the observer. Many dyslexics are highly distractable and seem disorganized in 
their daily activities." 

"Why individual tutoring?" 

"Dyslexics can learn to read, write, and spell, but they cannot learn in the conventional manner. Since 
they find it difficult to form clear, strong images of the sight and sound of letters, a method which employs 
simultaneous visual, 'auditory and kinesthetic impressions produces sharper images. They must have a highly 
structured phonics program. Often they must depend on memorized phonetic rules. Progress is generally 
slow and constant repetition is needed. Because of the diversity and severity of the problems, tutoring on a 
one-to-one basis is usually advised." 

In the program at the Junior High School, there is homework in the form of a personal notebook kept by 
each student. It contains references concerning vocabulary, spelling rules, phonics clues, grammar rules 
and any other material applicable to the student's individual situation. 

Teachers in both programs are continually evaluating progress and they keep parents informed either 
by periodic conferences or by informal reports. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Two classes for retarded children are currently operated in rented facilities at the Church of the Good 
Shepherd. In addition to instruction by their own teachers who are assisted by one teacher-aide, the pupils 
are visited by physical education, music, and art supervisors. Older pupils take physical education, indus- 
trial arts, and home economics with their peers at the Junior High School. Guidance services are provided 
for these children and special efforts are made to aid in placement either in jobs or in schools for vocational 
training when they have benefited all they can from our classes. 

One of the teachers describes objectives and activities as follows: 

"The teacher's m.ajor objective for the children is some degree of social and vocational performance. 
Less stress is placed on academic development. We try to aid each student in the class toward better adjust- 
ment within his environment with emphasis on standards, values, and attitudes. 

40 



"The teaching in the class is tailored to each individual and his needs. Most of these children need to 
have help in building their confidence and self-esteem. When this is achieved the child will perform better 
academically and eventually to his potential. Our aim is to send fine and worthwhile citizens out into the 
community. " 

With the opening of the new elementary school on Spruce Street in September 1968, the two classes 
will be housed once again within the school complex and facilities will be ideal. 

SPEECH THERAPY 

One speech therapist currently serves the Acton Public Schools. She says, "We tend to assume that 
the ability to express ourselves adequately and easily develops spontaneously in the child. But this is not 
an inborn trait; it is a skill. It is the product of a learning process. " 

She lists the objectives of the speech therapy program as follows: 

1. To enable the student with a speech handicap to relate more successfully to his environment and to 
convey his thoughts and enaotions through more effective oral communication. 

2. To help the student accept himself and recognize his speech problem. 

3. To enlist the insight and aid of parents, teachers, and peers in understanding the student's speech 
problem. 

4. To help the student acquire knowledge and understanding of his individual problem. 

5. To set before the student developmental tasks in which he can experience success. 

6. To help the student grow in self- evaluation, personal desire to improve, and acceptance of his 
limitations. 

7. To help the student gain a sense of personal responsibility and independence in improving his own 
speech production. 

After screening all children in grades 1-6, the speech therapist selected those with the most serious 
speech difficulties. After further testing she began corrective work with them either individually or in small 
groups according to common needs. Each student has two instructional periods a week in his own school and 
the latest speech equipment and materials are utilized to help him overcome his problem. The therapist does 
periodic testing in order to evaluate progress. 

CONCLUSION 



The personnel involved in each of the helping service programs have specialized training in their respec- 
tive fields. Each person is keenly interested in children and in offering individualized help wherever there are 
particular needs. None of the program;S is isolated from the rest of the school organization. Rather, each is 
an integral part of the total educational process. The specialists work closely with one another and with school 
administrators and teachers and they are often a useful and valuable liaison with parents. 

Finally, I should like to thank all who have made these services possible and who are helping to make 
them operate smoothly - the townspeople, the School Committees, the Superintendent of Schools, and the Assist- 
ant Superintendent, the several school Principals, the teachers, the secretaries, and the individual members 
of the special services team. I am grateful for the continuous learning experience offered to me. My position 
is one of constant challenge and interest. 

Ruth Proctor 
^ Director of Guidance 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 

The annual physical examinations were completed in November. Physical examinations for those par- 
ticipating in competitive athletics were conducted in August. Parents were notified of all medical, dental, 
and orthopedic problems as encountered. 

In conjunction with the Board of Health, clinics were held for Tuberculin Testing, Diphtheria, and 
Tetanus immunization. 

I wish to thank all who assisted me, with special thanks to the school and town nurses. 

Paul P. Gates, M. C. 

41 



SCHOOL NURSE REPORTS 

Acton Public Schools 
January 1967 through December 1967 

The yearly screening tests of Vision and Hearing were completed in grades one through six, and refer- 
rals were sent to parents when necessary. The three Elementary Schools were visited daily and for any 
emergencies. Bi-weekly visits were made to the Special Classes in the Episcopal Church. 

In April and November the Board of Health conducted the Tine Testing for grades one and four, check- 
ing 1060 students for Tuberculosis. 

We also had a Dental survey of grades one, two, and three, by the State Department of Public Health 
Dental Hygienist. 

Our regular Pre-School Clinic was held in April, and our school physician examined 70 children. He 
also conducted the physical examinations for the fourth grades. The heights and weights were done in the 
spring by the nurse and secretary. 

In general, the health of our school children is above average, but we must still work closely with the 
teachers, parents, guidance counselors and above all, the children to keep it that way. 

Next September it will be necessary by law, for all pre-school children to complete their physical 
examinations and all six immunizations (Diptheria, Pertusis-whooping cough. Tetanus, Small-pox, Polio, 
and Measles vaccine) before entering school. This law will also necessitate grades one through eight to be 
checked and possible extra clinics held. • 

1 wish to thank all the personnel who have been so helpful to me during the past year. 

Eileen F. Hale, R. N. 

Acton-Boxborough Regional Schools 
January through December 1967 

Tine (Tuberculin) Testing was done in March, 1967. It was offered to students in Grades 7 and 9. A 
total of 443 students took advantage of this clinic. All necessary referrals were made by the Board of Health. 

A special clinic was held on August 21, 1967, at which time students wishing to participate in football 
or soccer practice prior to the opening of school, were examined by Dr. Paul Gates. 

Beginning on September 11, 1967 and continuing into October, Dr. Gates has completed physicals on 
all candidates for competitive athletics, all students in Grades 7 and 10, and all new students. Parents were 
notified of any medical or dental defects. The total number examined was 504 at the High School and 412 at 
the Junior High School. 

Hearing testing has been completed at the Junior High School. All necessary referrals have been sent. 
Eye testing is nearly complete at the High School. 

In November, the Board of Health decided to hold another Tine (Tuberculin) Clinic. Therefore, a 
Diptheria- Tetanus Clinic was not offered during the calendar year of 1967. It will be offered in March, 1968 
to students in Grades 9 and 12. Grades 7 and 9 were offered the Tine Test. A total of 489 students took 
advantage of this clinic. The follow up was done by the Board of Health. 

Genuine thanks are extended to the administration. Dr. Gates, and Mrs. Larsen whose help and coop- 
eration have greatly contributed to a sound health program for the students of this community 

Helen L. Rhodes, R. N. 



42 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 



June 9, 1967 



Salutatorian: Jill Cranna, Pembroke College 

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School Alumni 
Association Scholarship: 

Jill Cranna, Pembroke College 
Warren Humphrey^ Tufts University 
Linda Nyquist, Mount Holyoke College 

Blanchard Memorial Scholarship: 

Leslee Towne, Mt. Auburn Hospital 

School of Nursing 
Leila Erkkinen, University of Massachusetts 

Acton Center Woman's Club Scholarship: 
Linda Koski, Salem State College 

West Acton Woman's Club Scholarship: 
Cynthia Loring, Bennington College 

Acton Garden Club Scholarship: 

Michael Pinsky, McGill University 

Acton Parent- Teacher 's Association Scholarship: 

Suzanne Hebert, Bates College 
Karen Gravin, Wheaton College 

Acton Rotary Club Scholarship: 

Robert Dee, University of Rhode Island 
Leora Wristen, Boston University 

Acton Firemen's Association Scholarship: 

Robert Beaudoin, University of Rhode Island 
Elaine Stanley, Springfield College 

Acton Lions Club Scholarship: 

Mark Benson,. University of Massachusetts 
Leslie Bernard, Anna Maria College 

Acton Teacher's Association Scholarship: 

Linda Koski, Salem State College 

Jeanne Laferriere, University of Massachusetts 



Valedictorian: Janet Romaine, Smith College 

John E. Donelan Scholarship: 

Scott Prentice, University of Massachusetts 

Irving S. Duren Scholarship: 

Marion Haley, Mt. Auburn Hospital 
School of Nursing 

Acton Junior Chamber of Commerce Scholarship: 
Joan Driscoll, Fisher Junior College 

Edwards Quimby Post No. 2 84 - 
American Legion Medals: 

Robert Beaudoin, University of Rhode Island 
Linda Nyquist, Mount Holyoke College 

Harvard Club in Concord Book Prize: 
Scott Hebert 

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School Awards to 
the Top Ranking Students of the Class of 1967 

Janet Romaine, Smith College 

Jill Cranna, Pembroke College 

Bradford Fiske, University of Massachusetts 

Paul Starr, Brandeis University 

Joan Driscoll, Fisher Junior College 

Bausch and Lomb Medal: 

Janet Romaine, Smith College 

Daughters of the American Revolution Award: 
Linda Nyquist, Mount Holyoke College 



Outstanding Senior of the Class of 1967 
Linda Nyquist 



NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY MEMBERS 



Grade XII 



Leslie Bernard 
Thomas Bubier 
Jill Cranna 
Robert Dee 
Joan Driscoll 
Leila Erkkinen 
Suzanne Hebert 



Catherine Holdway 
Warren Humphrey 
Karen Gravin 
Linda Koski 
Barbara Landell 
Cynthia Loring 
Donna Mitchell 



Linda Nyquist 
Beverly Perkins 
Michael Pinsky 
Pamela Pollino 
Scott Prentice 
Virginia Ray 
Janet Romaine 



Claudia Schwarm 
Elaine Stanley 
Doris Suther 
Leslee Towne 
Pamela Veenstra 
Grieg Westley 
Leora Wristen 



I 



43 



Grade XI 



Christine Borowski 
Carol Christiansen 
Pamela Colls 
Maryanne Dargin 
Marylin Davis 
Richard Davis 
James Dow- 
Paul Edwards 
Jeanne Fiore 
Sharon Floyd 



Scott Hebert 
Joan Heustis 
Virginia Kress 
Geoffrey Larkin 
Lee Lester 
Linda Lillibridge 
Tamara Loring 
Jane Meehan 
Elaine Merrill 
David Miner 



Ronald Miserendino 
Christopher Moulton 
Christopher Oliver 
Ronald Palaima 
Gordon Pinsky 
Andrea Sanford 
Cynthia Sarno 
Frank Schell 
Jonathan Schock 
Suzanne Shepard 



Russell Silva 
Christine Smith 
Patricia Smith 
Paul Stanley 
Christine Tolf 
Kathy Tuttle 
Robert Werbach 
Mary Anne Willard 
Deborah Wishner 
Carla Woodward 
Mark Woodward 



THE CLASS OF 1967 



Deborah Lyn Aldrich 
Lester Russell Allen, 111 
Robert James Anestis, IV 
Linda Rae Balmat 
Carol Helen Batstone 
Robert Alan Beaudoin 
Susan Lynn Beaudry 
Michael Edward Belmont 
Mark William Benson 
Karen Ewing Bentsen 
Conrad Irving Berlied 
Leslie Ann Bernard 
Linda Joyce Blake 
Susan Jeanne Blake 
Jo-Ann Bowen 
Russell Sherman Broadwell 
David John Brown 
Kathy Ann Brumm 
Philip Ernest Brzezinski 
Thomas Atwood Bubier 
Charles Edward Bursaw 
Antonio Jose' Calderdn 
Geoffrey Caless 
David Wyman Calkins, Jr. 
Robert North Cataldo 
Eileen Barbara Charbonneau 
Linda Karin Clegg 
William Newell Clark 
Thomas Francis Codyer 
Francis Joseph Coughlan 
Lorna Christie Coutts 
David Ernest Craig 
Jill Patricia Cranna 
Rebecca Louise Crosby 
Jeffrey Leo Cunningham 
Anthony Dale DaCosta 
Maryann Dadarria 
Donald Carlton Davis 
Gregory Allen Davis 
Robert David Dee 
Susan Anna Demers 
Gordon O. Dionne 
Joan Driscoll 
Marion E. Duggan 
Patricia Diane Durham 
Norma Ruth Edgin 
Donna Lee Edwardsen 
Leila Eileen Erkkinen 
Mark Charles Evangelos 
Brian Edward Farrell 
Roger James Feltus 
Virginia Mary Angela Feltus 
Bradford White Fiske 
Beverly Ann Flannery 
Victoria Catherine Flynn 
Marilyn Ruth Foster 



Martha Droitcour French 
Donald Ray Galbreth 
Herbert A. Goodman, Jr. 
Karen Ann Gravin 
Rodney Allen Grekula 
Mark Richard Grey 
Marion Ann Haley 
Stephen James Halloran 
Gloria Jacque Harkins 
Pamela Warren Hartwell 
Suzanne Therese Hebert 
David Watson Hedin 
Ralph Alden Hekkala 
John Clarence Hill 
Linda Jeanne Hodgson 
Kathleen Marie Hogan 
Catherine Anne Holdway 
Ronald Edward Holdway 
Dudley Templeton Howe 
Jeffrey Bertrum Howe 
Charlene Marie Hryniewich 
Sandra' Darleen Huff 
Warren Mills Humphrey 
Kathleen Wilson Jopling 
Robert Frank Kehoe 
Barbara Susan Kelley 
Karl Albert Klauer 
Harold John Knight 
Arlene Janice Knipp 
Dean Richard Knipp 
Kristina Aldrich Knippel 
Linda Josephine Koski 
Jeanne Raye Laferriere 
Barbara Sue Landell 
Laurel Lee Lazaro 
Pamela Lee Loomis 
William Stephen Lord 
Cynthia Farley Loring 
David Arthur Lortz 
Janis Ann Luchford 
John Francis MacDonald 
Hope Wheeler MacPherson 
Jane Alison Maleady 
Martin Charles Meakin 
Cynthia Elizabeth Merrill 
Donna Lee Mitchell 
Jeanne Ellen Moland 
Peter MoUer 
Susan Moore 
Daniel Joseph Morse 
Raymond Joseph Muise 
Richard North Mulvey 
Christine Lorayne Nelson 
Linda Virginia Nyquist 
Lesley Elizabeth O'Connell 
William deLaSalle O'Connor 



Elaine Marie O'Grady 
Robert Paul O'Neil 
Janice Mae Ott 
Suzanne Terrill Palmer 
Jonathan Clark Patrick 
Beverly Ellen Perkins 
Gail Perry 

Michael Raymond Pinsky 
Pamela Anne Pollino 
Mary Bernadette Powers 
Eliot Scott Prentice 
Bruce Edmands Prowten 
Virginia Marie Ray 
Paul Ilsley Richardson 
Christina Phillips Rogers 
Ruth Janet Romaine 
Linda Sue Rorer 
Susan Mary Ryan 
Pamela Anne Saaristo 
Diane Marie Scholz 
Claudia Jean Schwarm 
Constance Reid Shores 
Holly Dee Simpson 
Paul Allen Sindoris 
Christopher Charles Sinnett 
Patricia Anne Smith 
Harry Snyer, HI 
Kathryn A. Somerside 
David W. Sparrow 
Elaine Elizabeth Stanley 
Carol Marie Staples 
Paul Michael Starr 
Mark Robert St. Martin 
Michael D. Stormont 
Paula Ellen Strong 
Doris Elizabeth Suther 
Gary L. Sweatt 
Doreen Teele 
Jamie Kathleen Thomas 
Janet Elaine Thomas 
Leslee Grace Towne 
Nancy Jean Trebendis 
Pamela Jean Veenstra 
Henry J. Wall, Jr. 
Carol Frances Warren 
Grieg A. Westley 
George W. Wetherbee 
David Stewart White 
Kenneth C. White omb 
Bruce Gordon Wiggs 
Frank Henry Willard 
Ronald W. Wilson, Jr. 
L. B. Withrow 
Roderick W. Wood 
Stuart Hughes Woodward 
Leora Ann Wristen 



44 



SCHOOL FINANCES - 1967 



Acton Public Schools 



Received - To the Credit of Schools 



State Aid for Public Schools, Chapter 70 
State Aid for Transportation, Chapter 71 
Special Education, Chapters 69 and 71 
Federal Aid 



$212, 627. 91 
42, 657. 00 
17, 971. 80 
17, 703. 00 



Appropriated, March 1967 

Federal Funds, balances 12/31/66 and anticipated 1967 

Gross Operating Budget, 1967 



5876, 442. 00 
34, 442. 00 



$910, 884. 00 



Total Expended for Maintenance and Operation in 1967 
Cost per pupil (2106 as of 10/1/67) 



$906, 271. 00 
$ 430.33 



PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1968 



January 1 - December 31, 196f 



Acton Public Schools 

ADMINISTRATION 

School Committee 

Salaries 

Conference Attendance 

Expendable Supplies 

Printing and Advertising 

Magazines, Books, Dues 

School Census 

TOTAL ADMINISTRATION 

INSTRUCTION 
Salaries 
Additional Staff 
Substitutes 

Sabbatical Leave Substitutes 
Special Class Aides 
Teachers Reimbursed for Courses 
Conferences 
Textbooks 
Supplies 

TOTAL INSTRUCTION 

PLANT OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE 
Salaries 
Supplies 
Fuel 
Water 
Gas 

Electricity 
Rentals 
Telephones 

Maintenance - Equipment 
Maintenance - Buildings 

TOTAL PLANT OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE 



700. 00 
24, 725. 00 
300. 00 
350. 00 
100. 00 
200. 00 
150. 00 



;788, 399. 00 

49, 900. 00 

9, 000. 00 

4, 400. 00 

3, 000. 00 

10, 300. 00 

700. 00 

15, 800. 00 

33, 073. 00 



37, 551. 00 

6, 500. 00 

11, 800. 00 

1, 100. 00 

2, 100. 00 
14, 750. 00 

3, 422. 00 

2, 600. 00 

3, 500. 00 

0. 00 



$ 26, 525. 00 



$914, 572. 00 



$ 83, 323. 00 



45 



NON- INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 
Libraries 

Spruce St. School Cafeteria - cost for one month 
Salaries - Health and School Lunch 
Eye and Ear Tests 
Health Supplies 

TOTAL NON- INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 

Music - Instruments and Equipment 
Office and Classroom Equipment 

TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY 

TRANSPORTATION 

Pupil Transportation 
Field Trips 

TOTAL TRANSPORTATION 
CONTINGENCY FUND 



3, 900. 00 

2, 800. 00 

11, 935. 00 

400. 00 

251. 00 



1, 622. 00 
4, 640. 00 



107, 100. 00 
2, 000. 00 



$ 19,286.00 



6, 262. 00 



109, 100. 00 
25, 000. 00 



SUMMARY 

ADMINISTRATION 

INSTRUCTION 

PLANT OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE 

NON- INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 

TRANS POR T ATION 

CONTINGENCY FUND 



$ 26,525.00 

914, 572. 00 

83, 323. 00 

19,286. 00 

6,262. 00 

109, 100. 00 

25. 000. 00 

$1, 184, 068. 00 



Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 
Received to the Credit of the District 



State Aid for Transportation, Chapter 71 
Federal Aid, P. L. 874, and P. L. 864, Title V 



45, 508. 00 
42, 359. 00 



Appropriated, March 1967 
Transfers and Anticipated Income: 

Balance 1966 Operating Budget 
1965-66 Transportation Reimbursement 
12/31/66 Federal Funds 
1967 Anticipated Federal Funds 

Gross Operating Budget, 1967 



12,332.41 
43, 970. 00 
22, 702. 90 
29, 000. 00 



$ 908,788.69 



108, 005.31 
$1, 016, 794. 00 



Total Expended for Maintenance and Operation in 1967 
Cost per pupil (1620 as of 10/1/67) 



11, 013, 814. 91 
626. 06 



46 



PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1968 



January 1 - December 31, 1968 
Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 



ADMINISTRATION 

School Committee 
Salaries 

Conference Attendance 
Expendable Supplies 
Printing and Advertising 
Magazines, Books, Dues 
School Census 
Related Insurance 
Bond Treasurer 
Interest on Loans 

TOTAL ADMINISTRATION 



700. 00 
31, 525. 00 
300. 00 
600. 00 
100. 00 
100. 00 
150. 00 
446. 00 
175. 00 
3, 000. 00 



$ 37,096.00 



INSTRUCTION 



Present Staff Salaries 
Additional Staff 
Substitute Teachers 
Conferences and Travel 
Related Insurance 
Data Processing 
Professional Projects 
Teachers Reimbursed for Courses 

Total Salaries and Related Expenses 



551, 800. 00 

31, 519. 00 

7, 000. 00 

1, 150. 00 

10, 503. 00 

4,480. 00 

5, 000. 00 

10, 552. 00 



$ 922,004.00 



Textbooks 
Art 

Business 
English 
Guidance 
Home Economics 
Industrial Arts 
Languages 
Mathematics 
Mechanical Drawing 
Remedial Reading 
Music 
Science 
Social Studies 

Reading Program - Dyslexia 
Supplementary Reading 

TotaUTextbooks 

Instructional Supplies (Specific) 
Art 

Audio-Visual Aids 
Business 
English 
Guidance 
Home Economics 
Industrial Arts 
Languages 
Mathematics 
Mechanical Drawing 
Music 

Postage - Office Supplies 
Physical Education 
Rebind Books 
Remedial Reading 
Science 
Social Studies 
Reading Program - Dyslexia 

Total Supplies (Specific) 

Instructional Supplies (General) 

TOTAL EXPENSES OF INSTRUCTION 



100. 00 
725. 00 

4, 782. 00 
400. 00 
200. 00 
200. 00 

7, 910. 00 

1, 345. 00 
200. 00 
420. 00 
360. 00 

2, 500. 00 
4, 772. 00 

195. 00 
800. 00 



2, 515. 00 
1, 800. 00 

841. 00 

2 92. 00 
1, 025. 00 
2, 600. 00 
2,200. 00 

530. 00 
1, 160. 00 

666. 00 
1, 304. 00 
2, 800. 00 
1, 524. 00 

900. 00 

185. 00 
7, 100. 00 
1, 566. 00 

195. 00 



$ 24, 909. 00 



$ 29,203.00 
$ 10,500.00 



$ 986,616.00 



47 



OPERATION OF PLANTS 

Present Staff Salaries 
Additional Staff 
Supplies 
Fuel 
Water 
Gas 

Electricity- 
Telephones 
Related Insurance 
Rental - Air Conditioners 

TOTAL OPERATION OF PLANTS 

MAINTENANCE OF PLANTS 
Instructional Equipment 
General Maintenance Equipment 
Replacements 
Upkeep of Buildings 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE OF PLANTS 

NON- INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 
Libraries 

Salaries - Health and School Lunch 
Eye and Ear Tests 
Health Supplies 

Middlesex County Retirement Assessment 
Insurance 
Related Insurance 

TOTAL NON- INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 



41, 024. 00 
4, 500. 00 
9. 000. 00 

11, 000. 00 
1, 028. 00 
1,250. 00 

16, 700. 00 

4, 340. 00 

1, 316. 00 

684. 00 



5, 693. 00 
5, 000. 00 
4,449. 00 
1, 145. 00 



12, 000. 00 

10,400. 00 

200. 00 

362. 00 

8, 000. 00 

5, 500. 00 

330. 00 



$ 90,842.00 



16, 287. 00 



36, 792. 00 



1 



OUTLAY 

Music - Instruments and Equipment 

Classrooms - Projectors, etc. 

Physical Education 

Office Equipment 

Furniture - Classroom and Office 

Grounds Equipment 

TOTAL OUTLAY 

TRANSPORTATION 

Pupil Transportation 
Field Trips 

TOTAL TRANSPORTATION 

SPECIAL CHARGES 

70% Blanchard Auditorium 1967 Operating Expense 

CONTINGENCY FUND 



1,409. 00 
5,337. 00 
1, 943. 00 

939. 00 
8, 000. 00 

350. 00 



71, 000. 00 
1, 000. 00 



17, 978. 00 



$ 72, 000. 00 

7, 054. 00 
25, 000. 00 



RECAPITULATION 



Administration 

Instruction 

Operation of Plants 

Maintenance of Plants 

Non- Instructional Services 

Outlay 

Transportation 

Special Charges 

Contingency Fund 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION 

NON- CLASSIFIED, School Athletic Fund 

DEBT SERVICE 

GRAND TOTAL 



$ 37, 096. 00 
986, 616. 00 
90, 842. 00 
16,287. 00 
36, 792. 00 
17, 978. 00 
72, 000. 00 
7, 054. 00 
25, 000. 00 

$1,289, 665. 00 

13, 971. 00 

284,375. 00 



$1, 588, Oil. 00 



48 



TOTAL BUDGET (GROSS) 



$1, 588, Oil. 00 



Gross Operating Budget 

Less: (1) Balance 1967 Operating Budget 

(2) 1966-1967 Transportation Reimbursement 

(3) 12/31/67 P. L. 874 balance 

(4) 12/31/67 Title V balance 

(5) 1968 anticipated P. L. 874 

(6) 1968 anticipated Title V 

Net Operating Budget 

Debt Service 
Interest 
Maturing Debt 
Less: Anticipated State Aid 

Planning Reimbursement 

Net Debt Service 



$1,289, 665. 00 

( 2, 979. 00) 
(45, 508. 00) 
(10, 588. 00) 
( 2,200. 00) 
(25, 000. 00) 
( 500.00) 



210, 000. 00 
(136, 041. 00) 
( 20, 000. 00) 



$1,202, 890. 00 



74, 375. 00 



53, 959. 00 



Non-Classified 

School Athletic Fund 

TOTAL BUDGET (NET) 

( ) = 242, 816. 00 

Net Budget = 1.345, 195. 00 

1, 588, Oil. 00 



13, 971. 00 
$1, 345, 195. 00 



APPORTIONMENT OF THE CHARGES TO BE ASSESSED 
AGAINST THE TOWNS OF ACTON AND BOXBOROUGH 



Year 196 



Acton 



^Operating Expenses, 89.7% of $1,191,224** 
Cost of Transportation 48,024 

Less Reimbursement (66-67) 39,408. 

Debt Service, 95% of $128,334. 
Non-Classified, 89.7% of $13,971. 



$1, 068, 528. 00 

8, 616. 00 

121, 917. 00 

12, 532. 00 



;i, 211, 593. 00 



Boxborough 

^Operating Expenses, 10.3% of $1,191,224.** 
Cost of Transportation 9,150. 

Less Reimbursement (66-67) 6,100. 

Debt Service, 5% of 128,334. 

Non-Classified, 10.3% of 13,971. 



Acton Student Enrollment 10/1/67 
Boxborough Student Enrollment 10/1/67 



1453 
167 

1620 



(89.7%) 
(10.3%) 



$ 122,696.00 

3, 050. 00 
6,417. 00 
1,439. 00 



$ 133.602.00 
$1,345, 195. 00 



•'Gross Operating Budget 
Less: 1967 M & O Balance 

1967 P. L. 874 Balance 

1967 Title V Balance 

1968 Anticipated P. L. 874 
1968 Anticipated Title V 

Combined -Cost of Current Transportation Charges 



$1,289, 665. 00 
( 2, 979. 00) 
(10, 588. 00) 
( 2,200. 00) 
(25, 000. 00) 
( 500.00) 
(57. 174. 00) 

$1, 191,224. 00 



49 



ACTON-BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



Treasurer's Report 
December 31, 1967 



Balance, December 31, 1966 

Receipts, 1967: 

Town of Acton 

Town of Boxborough 

State Aid for Construction 

Federal Aid 

Transportation Reimbursement 

School Lunch 

School Athletics 

Federal Taxes 

State Taxes 

Teachers' Retirement 

County Retirement 

Teachers' Insurance 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 

Group Life Insurance 

Acton Teachers Association 

Tax Annuities 

Earned Interest 

Miscellaneous 



$ 247,786.58 



Total Receipts 



974, 082. 65 

92, 654. 04 

136, 133. 22 

42,359. 71 

45, 508. 00 

97,558. 12 

4, 857. 90 

114,491.43 

14,445. 35 

34, 099. 37 

5, 136. 93 

1, 133. 55 

10, 199.24 

679. 70 

2, 085. 00 

375. 00 

3, 882. 10 

726.08 



Total 



$1, 580, 407.39 
$1, 828, 193. 97 



Disbursements, 1967 



Maintenance and Operation: 

General Control 

Instruction 

Operation of Plants 

Maintenance of Plants 

Non-Instructional Services 

Outlay 

Transportation 

Blanchard Auditorium Lease 

Contingency 

Construction 

Payment on Principal 

Interest on Debt 

Smith-Hughes Vocational Ed. 

School Lunch 

School Athletics 

Federal Taxes 

State Taxes 

Teachers' Retirement 

County Retirement 

Teachers' Insurance 

Blue Cross -Blue Shield 

Group Life Insurance 

Acton Teachers Association 

Tax Annuities 

Town of Acton 

Town of Boxborough 

Total Disbursements 

Balance, December 31, 1967 

Balance 



23, 798. 86 

772, 902. 67 

76, 764. 64 

12,304. 38 

28,494. 86 

9,426. 00 

57, 873. 50 

7,250. 00 

25, 000. 00 

50,420. 15 

210, 000. 00 

80,870. 00 

572. 00 

101, 083. 74 

17,266. 97 

114,491.43 

14,352. 15 

34, 099.37 

5, 136. 93 

1, 133.55 
10, 192. 14 

679. 70 

2, 085. 00 
375. 00 

5, 166. 00 
536. 00 



$1, 662, 275. 04 

165, 918. 93 

$1,828, 193. 97 



Priscilla Felt 
Treasurer 



50 



LIBRARIES 



The year 1967 has been one of great progress and change for the Acton Memorial Library. The new 
building with floor space five times that of the original 1889 building was dedicated to the service of the 
townspeople on May twenty-first. The Dedication Program opened with an invocation by Reverend Roger 
W. Wootton, representing the Action Religious Community. Raymond A. Shamel, Chairman of the Dedi- 
cation Committee, then welcomed the assembly and introduced distinguished guests. Mrs. Marian L. 
Piper, our Librarian, expressed her pleasure at the completion of the new building and introduced her 
staff. Joseph J. Schiffer the architect, then commented on the building and suggested plans for the 
development of the grounds. In the absence of Marvin L. Tolf, then Chairman of the Board of Trustees, 
Earle Tuttle, Vice -Chairman, introduced the guest speaker, Mrs. V. Genevieve Galick, Director of the 
Massachusetts Bureau of Library Extension Service. Mrs. Galick spoke of the need for better library 
service and of the improved services available through the Regional Library System. Gifts of several books 
and a beautiful new bookcase for the adult reading room were then gratefully received from the Friends of 
the Acton Libraries; the Acton Junior Chamber of Commerce presented several volumes for young adults, 
the Church of the Good Shepherd presented a set of religious reference books, and the West Acton Woman's 
Club presented two volumes. After concluding comments and announcements by the Chairman of the Dedi- 
cation Committee, the program closed with a benediction by Reverend Wootton. Taped music was provided 
by Allen Beddoe, Gary Shamel, and Arthur Arms. 



Library Statistics of Interest for 1966 and 1967 



1966 



1967 



ACCESSIONS: 



CIRCULATION: 



Books in Library January 1 
Increase by purchase 
Increase by gift 
Withdrawn 



Fiction 
Non-fiction 
Juvenile 
Daily average 



Total 



1967 Book Purchases and Gifts 



24, 


054 


2. 


099 




125 




320 


40, 


949 


21, 


967 


37, 


989 




349 



100, 905 



Purchase 



25, 


958 


1, 


857 




119 




480 


43. 


695 


26, 


913 


44, 


976 




390 



115, 584 



Gift 



1968 
27, 454 



Increase 

6.7% 
22.2% 
18.4% 
41/day 

14.5% 

Total 



Adult Fiction 
Adult Non-fiction 
Juvenile Fiction 
Juvenile Non -fiction 



352 
900 
362 
243 



1, 857 



31 

88 





119 



383 
988 
362 
243 

1, 976 



FINES and Miscellaneous Income: 



(1966) $2,361.88 (1967) $3,675.56 



This money is put into the General Fund of the Town as required by law, and represents a reduction 
in the cost of operation of the library for the taxpayer. Fines were increased from 2f per day to 
5^ per day to expedite the return of books. This is in line with general library practice. 

The statistics above do not tell the whole story of library operation. In addition to the above books, the 
library has at any time 440 of the very latest fiction and non-fiction on a rental basis. Forty new books are 
received each month and the 40 least used books out of the 440 are returned each month. This keeps the latest 
best sellers available at all times without requiring the purchase of books which while extremely popular when 
issued, may be seldom called for a year later. This rental agreement provides also for the purchase of ten- 
month-old used books, selected by our staff as being of lasting value, at very low prices, thus effecting 
considerable savings. 

The statistics also do not show the great increase in book use by the much larger numbers of people who 
now are afforded comifortable and spacious accommodations for general reading, studying, and reference work 
in the library. We are receiving numerous compliments on our steadily increasing collection of references. 
The Library subscribes to more than sixty magazines covering all fields of interest, and also to local and 
national newspapers. 

Among the popular new library services are the more than one hundred books of classical fiction printed 
in large bold type. These books are especially designed for those whose vision is poor even with corrective 



51 



lenses, and are often the only books they can read. These books are also popular for reading aloud, and for 
children, and for those with good sight who prefer the larger type. Another innovation is the Swap Shelf of 
paper-back books where readers are invited to donate and to exchange paper-back books. No checking in 
or out of Swap Shelf books is required. Also added this year is a collection of over two hundred current 
college catalogs where high school Juniors and Seniors, and their parents may obtain information on the 
colleges of their choice. Additional college catalogs will be obtained upon request, and these catalogs will 
be kept current year after year. 

The Library, in addition to the display of books, offers the opportunity for displays of general interest. 
The League of Women Voters has had a display and displays are scheduled from several other groups. 
Hobby and art work displays are welcomed. Additional display facilities are budgeted. All displays must 
have the approval of the Board of Trustees and are limited to a definite period of time. A bulletin board is 
provided for announcements of general interest. This material should be given to the Librarian for posting. 

Miss Florence Merriam, a member of the Board of Trustees, has spent many days in identifying, 
numbering, cataloging, photographing, and writing a brief history of the Library's collection of art work, 
antiques, and historically important materials. Her excellent work will be continued to completion. 
Increased use of these nnaterials is planned. The unusually fine collection of printed Civil War Records 
which have been stored in the Library attic for lack of better space, will be made more readily available. 
Back issues of reference type magazines, for which formerly there was no space, are now readily available. 

The Library Staff, in addition to their usual duties, are completely revising the card file. This 
involves making new subject, author, and often numerous cross reference cards for all the books in the 
library except those recently cataloged. This work requires judgment and experience in assaying the 
informational and reference value of each book except fiction. This task, which will take many months to 
complete, will make all the informational resources of the library more completely and conveniently 
available. The^pojnpletion (^ t-his work will also expedite the telephone information service provided by 
the library. 

On Sunday October 29th, over two hundred townspeople gathered at the Library with the Board of 
Trustees, the Library Staff, visiting Librarians, and other personal friends and relatives to recognize 
and honor Mrs. Marian L. Piper who that day retired after eleven years of service as Librarian of the 
Acton Memorial Library. Gifts and cards were presented to Mrs. Piper by the Friends of the Acton 
Libraries, by the Library Staff, the Board of Trustees, and by other friends. The Chairman of the Board, 
Raymond Shanael, told the assembled crowd of Mrs. Piper's long years of accomplishnnent and service and 
thanked Mrs. Piper for her exemplary public service. Refreshments were served by the Friends of the 
Acton Libraries and taped music was provided by Gary Shamel. Later a dinner was given for Mrs. Piper 
by the Board of Trustees. 

The Board of Trustees and Library Staff are fortunate in obtaining the services of Mrs. Wanda Null 
as the new Librarian. Mrs. Null comes with excellent training and experience and has already contributed 
substantially to the Library's continuing program of improvement. The Library Staff is comprised of the 
following experienced personnel: 



Mrs. Wanda Null 
Mrs. Marion Armstrong 
Mrs. Edna Custance 
Mrs. Frances Collins 
Mrs. Ruth Chandler 
Miss Patricia Shepard 
Miss Suzanne Shepard 
Mr. Robert Trafton 



Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 
Children's Librarian 
General Assistant 
General Assistant 
Page 
Page 
Custodian 



The Board of Trustees and the Library Staff express their deep appreciation to the members of the 
Friends of the Acton Libraries and to the other volunteers who have contributed many hours each day to 
assist the Library Staff. Any persons wishing to assist in this work are invited to contact the Librarian 
or the "Friends" . The Children's Story Hour provided by the Friends is one of the continuing additional 
services of this fine organization. The new library facilities have offered a more attractive setting for this 
popular program. The Friends have continually been ready, willing, and able to provide appropriate and 
greatly appreciated assistance for the library, often on a continuing basis. 

The Board of Trustees, Staff, and patrons of the Library express their appreciation to the Acton 
Garden Club which has for many years provided the Library each week with floral decorations of outstand- 
ing beauty. In addition this organization has annually provided comiplete Christmas decoration of the Library. 

The Board of Trustees announced twenty-four additional new library hours per week effective January 
2, 1968. The Library is now open Monday through Friday from 9:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M., and on Saturday 
.from 10:00 A.M. to 6:00 P. M. Many new ideas for broader and better library services are being considered 
by the Board of Trustees with the purpose of providing the best possible library service to the Town within 



52 



the limits of the budget. Suggestions for improved services, for the purchase of specific books or sets of 
references, or of any progressive and helpful ideas applicable to the operations of the Library are welcomed. 
The regular meeting of the Board of Trustees is held at the Library at 8:00 P. M. on the first Thursday of 
each month and visitors are welcome. 

Raymond A. Shamel, Chairman 

Hayward S. Houghton Doris E. Peterson 

Florence A. Merriam Margaret Richter 

Mary Jane S. O'Neil Marvin L. Tolf 

James L. Parker Earle W. Tuttle 

Acton Memorial Library Trustees 



REPORT OF THE CITIZENS LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF WEST ACTON 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES: Edward Boyden, Barbara Nylander, Chairman, Percival Wood, Secretary. 

LIBRARY HOURS: Monday - 7-9 P.M., Tuesday - 3-6 P.M.. Thursday - 3-5 P.M. 
Thelma Hermes, Librarian 

ACCESSION: Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1967 6, 666 

Increase by purchase 199 

Increase by gift 244 

Withdrawn 323 

Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1968 6, 786 

CIRCULATION IN 1967: Fiction 1, 179 Non-fiction 1, 295 

Juvenile 2,677 Total 5,151 

RECEIPTS: Fines and Miscellaneous - $136.28 

The Trustees and I wish to express our thanks for the support of the following: the staff of the 
Acton Memorial Library; the Friends of the Acton Libraries; the Acton Garden Club for a beautiful 
Christmas wreath; Troop 23, Acton Girl Scouts, for books; Junior Troop 1020, Acton Girl Scouts, 
for window boxes of flowers and planting a perennial bed; Mr. Roger Feltus for an oil painting; and 
to the many individuals who have given books and magazines to the Library. 

Thelma C. Hermes 
Librarian 



53 



PUBLIC CEREMONIES 



The Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee is proud to report that 1967 was justifiably a suc- 
cessful year of the observance of patriotic holidays in the Town of Acton. The highlights of these ceremonies 
are as follows: 

Patriots' Day Program 

This program actually got underway on Sunday, April 16, 1967 at 2:30 P. M. with the Re-enactment of 
the Battle of the North Bridge in Concord. All of the existing re-formed Minutemen Companies were present. 
Col. Walter Johnson, commanding the Acton Minutemen, portrayed Captain Isaac Davis and, as is historically 
correct, was the first to be "killed" by the British before they turned and were followed across the bridge by 
the Acton Minuteman Company plus the other companies. It was an excellent re-enactment of that fateful 
morning on April 19, 1775. 

During Patriots' Day Eve, the Boy Scouts, led by Arthur Hirsch, enjoyed the Isaac Davis Camporee at 
the Nashoba Sportsman's Club. The Acton Lion's Club sponsored the Captain Isaac Davis Ball at the Blan- 
chard Auditorium, ABRHS. This was very well attended and the many couples enjoyed the entire evening. 

At 12:45 A. M. on April 19, 1967, Seymour A. DiMare, M. D. arrived at the site of the Captain Robbin's 
House on Old Concord Road to re-enact the Dr. Samuel Prescott- John Robbin's Ride. John Robbins was por- 
trayed by John Rodday. Both riders then departed to re-enact their respective rides through Acton until both 
arrived at the Captain Simon Hunt House where Mrs. Leo White, Yankee Catering Service, provided free 
refreshments for all. At each stop a Flintlock Musket Alarm was fired by the Acton Minutemen. 

The morning of April 19, 1967 dawned dark, dank, and cold with almost every conceivable kind of 
weather but the ceremonies proceeded without a hitch. The Invocation was given by Rev. Bryan Hehir, repre- 
senting the Acton Religious Community. A flag was presented to Mr. and Mrs. Wilho Anderson, the owners 
of the Isaac Davis Homestead for all of their kind cooperation in all previous ceremonies. Representatives of 
the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts raised the flag followed by the National Anthem played by the ABRHS Band. 
Special Boy Scout Camporee Awards were made by LTC. Burton A. Davis. A wreath was placed in honor of 
Captain Isaac Davis by Acton Minutemen, David H. Donaldson and Robert W. Wolfenden. Rev. Bryan Hehir 
offered a prayer. 

The Acton Minutemen gave a Flintlock Musket Salute. The remarks for the day were made by LTC. 
Lewis L. Milbett, USA Commanding Officer, U. S. Army Security Agency Training Regiments, Fort Devens, 
Massachusetts. LCdr. Veronica Gruber, USNR-R, representing the Freedom Foundation made presentation 
of George Washington Honor Medals. 

At 6:45 the assembled citizenry retraced the Line of March of the Acton Minutemen of 1775 over the 
Isaac Davis Trail to the music of the "White Cockade" by the ABRHS Band. The Town of Acton was honored to 
have present, retracing the Line of March of the Acton Minutemen, 1500 troops from the U. S. Army Security 
Agency Training Regiment from Fort Devens led by LCT. Lewis L. Millett, a Medal of Honor Holder. 

One of the features of the ASA Regiment were members dressed in uniforms depicting all of the wars in 
which our country has been involved since 1775. 

At 6:55 A. M. the marchers stopped for fifteen minutes at the Isaac Davis Monument on the Common in 
Acton Center to place a wreath by two Children of the American Revolution, Pauline L. Bursaw and Jeffrey W. 
Bursaw, a prayer by Rev. David K. Cain, representing the Acton Religious Community, and a Flintlock Mus- 
ket Salute by the Acton Minutemen. 

At 9:15 A. M., at the Minuteman Statue in Concord, the Acton Minutemen fired "the shot heard 'round the 
world" followed by Taps and Echo by the ABRHS Band in honor of Captain Isaac Davis and Abner Hosmer. 
Many of the marchers from Acton remained in Concord to enjoy the Ceremonies there and returned to Acton 
via bus through the courtesy of Laffin's Garage. 

Memorial Day Program 

Prior to the celebration of Memorial Day the Committee purchased geraniums and flags for all Veterans' 
graves in all the Acton Cemeteries. The Committee is grateful to the Acton Cemetery Department, under the 
direction of T. Fredericks. Kennedy, with assistance from the Acton Boy Scouts for their time in placing the 
flags and geraniums. The Committee is also very grateful to the Highway Department for their helpful assist- 
ance in preparing the- Route of the Parade. 

On Sunday afternoon. May 28, 1967 with H. Stuart MacGregor, Chief Marshal, the Acton Minutemen, 
Veterans, Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts paid a brief tribute to the Veterans buried in the Cemetery in North 
Acton. The Invocation was given by Rev. J. Gary Campbell, a wreath was placed and the Minutemen fired 
three volleys and the ceremony was ended with the playing of Taps by members of the ABRHS Band. 

54 



On Memorial Day, the parade formed in Acton Center, under the direction of H. Stuart MacGregor, 
Fire Chief of the Town of Acton, due to retire on November 30, 1967. His aides were Sumner D. Zimmer, 
Theron A. Lowden, T. Frederick S. Kennedy, and Explorer Scouts. 

The following units were in the line of march: The Colors and Color Guard supplied by the Edwards - 
Quimby Post #284 American Legion, The Honorable Selectraen and Clergy, the Acton-Boxborough Regional 
High School Band, Company C, 110th Armor, Massachusetts National Guard, The Sergeant-at-Arms and the 
Wreath Bearers, Veterans of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and Air Force, VFW Post #7016 
Acton, Edwards -Quimby Post #284 American Legion, The Acton Minutemen, The Acton Fire Department, 
The Acton-Boxborough Regional Junior High School Band, Girl Scouts, Brownies, Cub Scouts, and Boy Scouts. 

At 8:30 A. M. the Parade moved out smartly into Main Street towards the Isaac Davis Monument. On 
the Common, Rev. Justin J. Hartman gave the Invocation and wreaths were placed on all the Memorials. 

At this point in the proceedings all of the citizens of Acton and all of the marchers paused to give silent 
tribute to Brig. General George O. Van Orden, U. M. C, Ret., who had passed away at his home earlier in 
the month. As a Vice-President of Freedoms Foundation, General Van Orden had devoted much to enhance 
Acton and its Patriots' Day Ceremonies. The Parade marched down Concord Road to Woodlawn Cemetery 
where similar services were held with Rev. Justin J. Hartman again offering the Invocation. 

From Woodlawn Cemetery the Parade was transported in buses to South Acton, reforming in the South 
acton Shopping Center parking lot and proceeding along Main Street to Quimby Square. At Quimby Square, 
Rev. H. J. Kotila gave the invocation. A wreath was placed in honor of Private Howard Quimby who was the 
first soldier from Acton to make the supreme sacrifice in World War I. A detail of Acton Naval Reservists 
and Veterans marched over the bridge to cast a floral spray into the waters of Fort Pond Brook as a token of 
memory to all Naval, Marine, and Coast Guard personnel from Acton who have given their lives in defense of 
their country. The Parade then proceeded to the South Acton Fire Station to enjoy the usual coffee break. 

Once more the Parade was transported to West Acton in buses to Mt. Hope Cemetery for the Memorial 
Service. Rev. John Donlan gave the Invocation and then the Parade marched up Central Street to Edwards 
Square. The Parade formed around the Mead Triangle. A wreath was placed in honor of Private Sidney 
Edwards. The Invocation was given by Rev. John Donlan. The Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, Mrs. 
Mary K. Hadley, presented the flag flown from the Isaac Davis Monument to Chief H. Stuart MacGregor. As 
a part of these ceremonies, the Acton Minutemen presented Percy W. Wood his Minuteman Hat and an honor- 
ary membership in the Acton Minutemen for his many acts of devotion to the Acton Minuteman cause. 

At each of the five ceremonies three volleys were fired by a Firing Squad from Company C, 110th Armor 
Massachusetts National Guard. Taps and hymns were played by the ABRHS Band. 

Veterans Day Program 

The Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee cooperated with its sister committee in the Town 
of Concord in the Flag Retirement Ceremonies in Concord at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery at 7:00 A. M. on Veter- 
ans Day, November 11, 1967. Many citizens of Acton took advantage of the Ceremony to retire old flags. 

Conclusion 

In conclusion there are four points which should be naade: First, this Committee was deeply honored to 
be able to assist the committee of Acton Firemen who put on a very successful testimonial dinner to honor 
H. Stuart MacGregor upon his retirement from his service to the Fire Department. Secondly, by this report 
it should be noted that a special word of proud achievement should go to Raymond A. Shamel who concluded 
his term on this committee. His many plans for Patriots' Day will go down in the annals of our Town. Thirdly, 
it is difficult to write this report and list every person who has measurably contributed to the success of this 
committee and in lieu of this list it is asked that each person please accept the grateful thanks of all the com- 
mittee. 

Lastly, it is hoped that in the future this committee will be able to expand its celebration of local and 
national holidays as the budget is able to be expanded. 

Clark C. McElvein, Chairman 
Carl A. Hedin, Clerk 
Russell D. Hayward 
F. Wendell Putnam, III 
Edward C. Warren 
Percy W. Wood 

Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee 



55 



REGIONAL REFUSE DISPOSAL 



Article 12 of the December 1966 Special Town Meeting authorized the formation of the Acton Regional 
Refuse Disposal Planning Committee in accordance with Chapter 4, Sections 44A-44K of the laws. The 
Moderator appointed Calvin M. Farnsworth, Paul R. Nyquist, and William R. Romaine to form such a com- 
mittee. Following organization, the committee renewed the contact with the Assabet Regional Solid Waste 
Disposal Planning Board and met monthly with this group throughout the year. 

The regional planning board changed in town committee membership in that Concord and Lincoln dropped 
out and Boxborough joined the region. The member towns have taken town meeting action to officially sanction 
the appointment of members to regional refuse disposal planning committees. The regional planning board has 
drafted, reviewed, and signed an organizational procedure agreement which will guide its administration. 

There are several tasks which the regional committee have undertaken and others to be assigned. Two 
committees have comimented on reports which may affect the future direction of a regional solid waste dis- 
posal activity. 

The members of the Acton Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Committee have met with the Selectmen 
to discuss the present solid waste disposal situation in Acton. The Health Board Agent and the Town Engineer 
have discussed solid waste disposal methods with the committee. A recommendation will be prepared based 
upon data compiled by this group of five individuals which will include operational costs, equipment costs, land 
use, and collection methods. 

Paul R. Nyquist, Chairman 
Calvin M. Farnsworth 
William R. Romaine 

Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Committee 



TOWN ADMINISTRATION 



At the beginning of the year, resignations were received from Charles Grandy (Finance Committee) and 
Clyde Home (Personnel Board). Frederick Bubier and John Maes were appointed from the Finance Committee 
and Personnel Board, respectively, to fill the vacancies. Porter Jenks was appointed as a member at large 
to fill the vacancy created by Charles MacPherson's resignation in November of 1966. In August, John Maes 
was replaced by William Kemp as representative of the Personnel Board. 

During 1967, the Town Administration Study Committee convened 13 times, including meetings with the 
Selectmen and other boards. During February, a public hearing was held on the proposed Selectmen-Manager 
Charter which was on the March 1967 ballot. Charts illustrating the organization of the Town and the respon- 
sibilities of its boards and committees were presented, both for our present form of government and the pro- 
posed form. TASC also submitted a lengthy article to the two local newspapers explaining the committee's 
history and the proposed Selectmen-Manager Charter. Four of the five members of TASC supported this 
charter -- Porter Jenks dissenting. 

After the proposed charter was turned down at the March election, TASC recommended at the Annual 
Town Meeting that an $8,000 budget item be passed to enable the Selectmen to hire an administrative assistant 
for the balance of the year. The Selectmen have advertised widely for this position and have had a number of 
applications, but at the close of 1967 have not filled the position. The Annual Town Meeting also voted $400 
for expenses of the Town Administration Study Committee; none was spent. 

TASC decided to publicize the availability of petitions which would allow a Charter Commission to be on 
the ballot in March 1968. The committee felt that the voters should have the opportunity to choose this alterna- 
tive method of obtaining a new Town charter. Several petitions were distributed, but only 38 signatures were 
returned by December 1 instead of the more than 700 signatures which would have been required to place a 
Charter Commission question on the ballot. 

It was also proposed that a questionnaire be sent to registered voters to determine their feelings on the 
present form of Town government, and opinions on proposed modifications such as the Selectmen-Manager 
and Executive Secretary. Considerable discussion was held on such a questionnaire, but the proposal was 
abandoned since it was felt that it would not serve a useful purpose at this time. 

Walter B. Gates, Chairman 
Beatrice Perkins, Clerk, Planning Board Porter Jenks 

Frederick Bubier, Finance Committee William Kemp, Personnel Board 

56 



TOWN FOREST 



Fallen trees were removed from the fire lanes and access roads in both Town forests. The sign at the 
Durkee lot was repaired and rehung. 

The Scouts and other groups are now using the Town Forests for recreation and educational purposes. 

Franklin H. Charter 
Emery Nelson 
George E. Neagle 

Town Forest Committee 



TREE WARDEN 



Our tree planting program was started in late April this year. Eighty shade trees were planted along 
town ways and on front lawns adjacent to them. Most of them were living this past fall. 

A number of diseased or dangerous trees were removed by the Department. Many older trees situated 
close to the street were pruned up to prevent interference with trucks and buses. 

Franklin H. Charter 



INSECT PEST CONTROL 



A foliage spray for the control of leaf feeding insects was applied in June. A private contractor was 
hired to do the work this year. 

The Department removed 46 trees infected with Dutch Elm Disease. All this material is taken to the 
Town Dump and burned. 

Several areas were sprayed with a herbicide for the control of Poison Ivy. 

Franklin H. Charter 
Superintendent 



ARCHIVES 



This past summer the committee received a unique request from Mrs. Edith Labbie, Secretary of the 
Androscoggin Historical Society of Maine, asking for some information concerning a certain Lt. Samuel P. 
Brown, who perhaps came from Massachusetts Bay Province, Town of Acton. 

An ancient and very rare document had been presented to this Maine Society by Ernest Wesson of Auburn 
-Lewiston, Maine, which breathes renewed life into that historic march to Quebec by Col. Benedict Arnold 
and his band of men. When Mr. Wesson came upon the Lt. Samuel Brown manuscript among some of Senator 
Thomas Worthington's papers, he realized that he had found a treasure. Senator Worthington was one of Ohio's 
first Federal Congressmen, having settled in Chillicothe, Ross County, around 1796 and it was near there that 
Samuel Brown later settled. 

This manuscript or diary which Lt. Brown kept, describes in great detail the forming of this expedition, 
the trials, disappointments, the hardships suffered by the man and finally his capture and the account of his 
life as a prisoner, then his release and his appeal for his back pay and later his trip to Ohio and settelement 
there. 

57 



Mrs. Labbie's letter mentioned that she had carried on correspondence with historical sources in 
Massachusetts, Ohio, Washington, D. C, Maine State Historical Society, and had even made a trip to 
Dartmouth College to study the Kenneth Roberts papers that are stored there, seeking a clue. 

Since Maine at that period was a part of the mother state of Massachusetts, she finally decided to write 
to Acton, Massachusetts, hoping that she might find some clue of Samuel Brown, and also find out if he had 
belonged to any Military unit. 

In going through the records of the Acton Militia, this committee found that in the records of Captain 
Daniel H. Piper, Militia Co. A., a Samuel P. Brown was listed as a member of that company. 

In the last letter we received, this Society in Maine was still investigating further, as this seems to 
be the only clue that comes from Massachusetts Bay Province, Town of Acton. We also received the news 
paper, Lewiston Journal, dated May 13, 1967, which gives a vivid account of the contents of Lt. Brown's 
diary. 

This report may be a bit unique to some people, but we believe that this shows that the town records in 
the archives have been well kept. They have been microfilmed, and these films are stored in a safe place. 

The committee is planning to microfilm some of the town records from 1958 through 1967 soon after the 
first of the year. 

Frederick S. Kennedy 
Minetta D. Lee 
David L. May 

Archives Committee 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 



For the year ending December 31, 1967 there were eight accidents reported from the following depart- 
ments: 

School Department 2 

Highway Department 6 

Four of the injured required medical attention only, four required medical attention with a loss of time, 
but all are finaled out. 

Theron A. Lowden 



VETERANS AGENT 



For the year ending December 31, 1967 seven cases were aided under Veterans' Benefits at an expendi- 
ture of $10,850.00. It should be noted that one-half of the amounts expended under this program are reimburs- 
ed by the Commonwealth to the Town. During the year it was necessary to request the sum of $850.00 from 
the Reserve Fund to meet unforeseen medical expenses. 

Through this report I would like to remind all veterans and their dependents that Veterans' Services is 
maintained for the purpose of assisting them to initiate and properly develop their claims to which they are 
entitled. 

Norman L. Roche 



58 



CEMETERY 



Besides the routine maintenance of the cemeteries, several projects have been completed this past year. 
With the fine cooperation of the Engineering Department, we were finally able to lay out the road, lots, and 
single graves spaces in Mt. Hope Cemetery. We have tried for severaj. years to complete this project so the 
new road could be oiled but the work load of the Engineering Department was so great they just could not 
attend to this project. 

It seems that each year the petty vandalism increases in the cemeteries, small monuments are tipped 
over, trash cans smashed by cars, flower containers tipped over, beer cans to be picked up, etc. 

The Chapel in Woodlawn Cemetery was broken into; several C02 Fire extinguishers were taken, along 
with several other items. Also the tool shed in Mt. Hope Cemetery was entered and several items were taken; 
the party concerned in this break awaits police action. 

The Cemetery building was started late in November and it is hoped that it will be completed by early 
spring. Also a new water main was brought in from Concord road to this building. From this new main it is 
planned to extend smaller pipes to several new sections, so that they can be watered during a dry spell. 

The Board has several projects planned for the coming year: in Woodlawn Cemetery, to build a large 
stone retaining wall by the slope of the hill, near the high part of the cemetery, to extend a drainage system 
to relieve the surface water that lies in low parts of the cemetery, and also to continue hot topping of the roads. 

After a long study and discussion the Commissioners have decided to engage a landscape engineer to draw 
up plans for the development of a Garden Type Cemetery, in the open field between the present cemetery and 
the Morrison house on Concord Road. The Board feels that this type of a cemetery fits in more with the present 
type of open spaces and also has a more pleasing appearance to the general public. 

The Larrabee land has been purchased as voted at the last Town Meeting and plans have been made to use 
this land this coming year, in connection with one newer section of Woodlawn Cemetery. 

Also the Board has several projects planned to improve the appearance of Mt. Hope Cemetery: planting of 
new shrubs, oiling of roads, clearing of more land, and also to see what can be done about the front entrance 
of that Cemetery. 

The Board would like to express their appreciation to several departments who have helped the past year 
and also to the men of this department who have carried on this past year with a small work force and low 
wages. It is our hope that a new pay scale will go into effect this coming year. 

Harlan E. Tuttle 
Howard F. Jones 
Donald O. Nylander 

Board of Cemetery Commissioners 



VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 



There have been six interments of United States War Veterans in the Acton Cemeteries during the year 
1967. The names of the veterans, the dates and place of burial are as follows: 



Richard S. McCabe 
Percy S. Sweet 
Henry D. Doyle 
Edwin Anderson 
Dexter C. Phillips 
Albert E. Foster 



W. W. I & II 

W. W. I 

W. W. II 

W. W. II 

W. W. II 

W. W. 11 



February 14, 1967 

February 24, 1967 

June 6, 1967 

October 25, 1967 

November 8, 1967 

November 9, 1967 



Woodlawn Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 



Veterans Flag Standards have been placed on all of these departed Veterans' graves. Ten broken G.A.R. 
Flag Standards have been replaced with new ones. I have noticed that the flag standards in both the North and 
Woodlawn Cemeteries need painting and this work is planned for 1968. 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy 



59 



BIRTHS 



Births recorded 197 

Marriages recorded 94 

Deaths recorded 75 

IMPORTANT REQUEST 

Please notify the Town Clerk immediately of any error or omission in the following list of Births. 
Errors not reported at once can be corrected only by sworn affidavit, as prescribed by the General Laws, 
and may cause you inconvenience which can be avoided by prompt attention. 



Date 



Place 



BIRTHS REGISTERED IN 1967 
Name of Child 



Name of Parents 



Jan. 


1 


Concord 


Jan. 


1 


Nashua, N. 


Jan. 


3 


Concord 


Jan. 


4 


Concord 


Jan. 


6 


Concord 


Jan. 


6 


Concord 


Jan. 


7 


Concord 


Jan. 


10 


Boston 


Jan. 


12 


Concord 


Jan. 


14 


Concord 


Jan. 


15 


Concord 


Jan. 


16 


Concord 


Jan. 


16 


Concord 


Jan. 


17 


Concord 


Feb. 


1 


Concord 


Feb. 


1 


Concord 


Feb 


3 


Concord 


Feb. 


3 


Concord 


Feb. 


4 


Concord 


Feb. 


6 


Lowell 


Feb. 


7 


Concord 


Feb. 


7 


Concord 


Feb. 


7 


Concord 


Feb. 


7 


Concord 


Feb. 


7 


Concord 


Feb. 


9 


Concord 


Feb. 


10 


Concord 


Feb. 


13 


Concord 


Feb. 


13 


Concord 


Feb. 


13 


Concord 


Feb. 


14 


Concord 


Feb. 


15 


Concord 


Feb. 


19 


Concord 


Feb. 


23 


Concord 


Feb. 


26 


Concord 


Feb. 


26 


Concord 


Feb. 


28 


Concord 


Mar. 


1 


Concord 


Mar. 


1 


Concord 


Mar. 


4 


Concord 


Mar. 


5 


Concord 


Mar. 


5 


Woburn 


Mar. 


7 


Shirley 


Mar. 


16 


Somerville 


Mar. 


16 


Concord 


Mar. 


16 


Concord 


Mar. 


19 


Concord 


Mar. 


20 


Concord 


Mar. 


22 


Concord 


Mar. 


23 


Boston 


Mar. 


23 


Concord 



Girard, Donald Irving 
Power, Janice 
Parsons, Sarah Marie 
Dunphy, Melissa 
Ammons, Michael Bailey 
Nourse, Sarah Merriam 
"Flerra, Susan Marie 
Jorrens, Marc Stefan 
Rizzo, Paul Joseph 
Whynott, Thomas Robert, Jr. 
Greenough, Edward Paul 
Jenkins, Arne Gerard 
Foley, Dennis 
Schwartz, Marci Sara 

Monsen, Linda Jean 
Pacy, Jon Michael 
Douglas, Deborah Lee 
Faris, David Parker 
Delaney, Sharon Linda 
Wyman, Kimberly Ann 
Dyer, John Henry, III 
Gardner, Sarah Sprague 
McKelvie, Tammy Leigh 
Mowen, Keith Alan 
Stott, David John 
Diamond, Jamie Ann 
Murphy, Sean Patrick 
Mason, Allan Edward 
Potter, Alan John 
Quirk, Barry Daniel 
Comstock, Stephen James 
Masson, Deborah Jean 
MacKenzie, Bruce Martin 
Fallo, Christopher James 
Boehm, Linda Marie 
Harrington, Amy Beth 
Perry, Robert Christian 

Henderson, Lynne Valerie 
Soracco, Denise Marie 
McGarigle, Linda Marie 
Hitchcock, Stephen David 
Kerrigan, Donald Patrick 
Sullivan, .Kimberly Rose 
Bouley, Steven Norman 
Moody, Lorna Jill 
Torppa, Eric Teele 
James, Donald Stuart 
Day, Arthur Carey, Jr. 
Trombley, Matthew Walter 
Bedet, Charlotte Elizabeth 
Kardash, Paul Richard 



Donald P. and Lucy M. Ordway 
Robert C. and Jane L. Pacy 
James R. and Marjorie A. Sherwood 
John E., Jr. and Maureen L. Scribner 
John B., Jr. and Donna J. Thompson 
Timothy M. and Mary C. Cooper 
Louis F. and Marcia C. Reed — 
Peter P. and Katherine Farrow 
Thomas E. and Mary L. Lukis 
Thomas R. and Ivernia Butt 
Charles F. and Patricia M. Ashman 
Robert G. and Mary J. McNamara 
John J. and Joyce E. Hutchins 
Lawrence and Marie G. Haflin 

William N. and Helen M. Bruce 
John E. and Leslie A. Jeanson 
Mark T. and Susan A. Daley 
David B. and Edna B. Beachum 
Joseph W. and Emily M. Cotton 
William R. and Brenda G. Fuller 
John H., Jr. and Sheila M. Maloney 
George O., Ill and Joan A. Norris 
Kenneth R. and Linda A. Morrison 
John P. and Lorene R. Garrison 
Richard J. and Susan J. Rhone 
Bliss L. and Lorraine J. Scolaro 
James and Dorothy V. Shaw 
Allan E. and Kathleen V. Fallon 
John H. and Gail E. Pelton 
Daniel F. and Margaret A. Brusch 
Robert H. and Jean S. White 
Conrad W. and Sandra J. Huse 
Walter S. and Patricia H. Jacobsen 
Joseph J. and Suzanne Rowledge 
Frederick R. and Janet M. Reilly 
William L., Jr. and Ethel M. Anderson 
Robert L. and Nancy E. Bowlby 

Warren L. and Barbara E. Adams 
Donald J. and Marlene M. Spooner 
James J. and Julia Thome 
David R. and MaryBeth Liepshutz 
Harold P. and Ruth G. Des rosier s 
John H. and Virginia R. Happ 
Norman A. and Jean E. Gray 
Jay M. and Joyce E. Wilkes 
Harold A. and Janice P. Teele 
Richard D. and Marilyn J. Anderson 
Arthur C. and Joan M. Doughty 
Gary W. and Noreen M. Normandeau 
William T. and Judith Hastings 
John J. and Francois e A. Forcier 



60 



Date 



Place 



Name of Child 



Name of Parents 



Mar. 


24 


Boston 


Mar. 


24 


Boston 


Apr. 


4 


Concord 


Apr. 


4 


Concord 


Apr. 


6 


Concord 


Apr. 


7 


Arlington 


Apr. 


10 


Beverly 


Apr. 


10 


Boston 


Apr. 


12 


Concord 


Apr. 


12 


Concord 


Apr. 


15 


Concord 


Apr. 


19 


Waltham 


Apr. 


21 


Concord 


Apr. 


22 


Concord 


Apr. 


25 


Concord 


Apr. 


26 


Newton 


Apr. 


26 


Concord 


Apr. 


27 


Natick 


Apr. 


29 


Concord 


Apr. 


30 


Concord 


Apr. 


30 


Concord 


May 


2 


Concord 


May 


5 


Concord 


May 


14 


Concord 


May 


15 


Concord 


May 


15 


Cambridge 


May 


20 


Concord 


May 


21 


Concord 


May 


22 


Concord 


May 


23 


Concord 


May 


24 


Concord 


May 


26 


Concord 


May 


29 


Concord 


June 


1 


Concord 


June 


3 


Arlington 


June 


3 


Concord 


June 


5 


Boston 


June 


5 


Concord 


June 


10 


Concord 


June 


12 


Concord 


June 


12 


Concord 


June 


12 


Concord 


June 


15 


Concord 


June 


18 


Concord 


June 


21 


Newton 


June 


21 


Lowell 


June 


26 


Concord 


June 


26 


Winchester 


June 


28 


Concord 


June 


29 


Concord 


June 


29 


Concord 


July 


1 


Boston 


July 


2 


Concord 


July 


4 


Concord 


July 


4 


Concord 


July 


7 


Concord 


July 


8 


Concord 


July 


13 


Concord 


July 


13 


Boston 


July 


22 


Concord 


July 


23 


Concord 


July 


25 


Concord 


July 


26 


Concord 


July 


26 


Concord 


July 


27 


Boston 


July 


28 


Concord 



Walline, Jennifer Kristen 
Poppert, Anne Marie 

Gilberti, Donald Robert, Jr. 
O'Sullivan, Neil Patrick 
Nichols, Darryl Gary 
Pageau, Lisa Diana 
Pozerycki, Joseph William 
Resor, Phillip Griffith 
Andersen, Daniel Peter 
Peirson, Eric John 
i^Roche, Norman Lawrence, Jr. 
Scudder, Kenneth John 
McKee, David Michael 
Carpenter, Victoria Jane 
Meyer, Deborah Sue 
Dietrich, Gretchen Sally 
Soracco, Andrea Marie 
Duchesne, Michele Marie 
Hudgins, Houlder 
Luosalo, Steven George 
Soar, Elizabeth Doris 

Quinn, Randolph 
Ballou, Richard, III 
Hanson, William Edward 
Collins, Kimberley Ann 
Harvey, Brian Michael 
Percoco, Stephen Gerard 
Beran, David Donald 
Forsmo, Kari Ellen 
Moore, Jeffrey Andrew 
Caouette, Kristen Elizabeth 
Hammond, Heather Jane 
Eraser, Rose Marie 

• MacKenzie, Dana Jon 
Oldenburg, Kristen Elizabeth 
Orner, Mary Catherine 
Fisher, Eileen Marie 
Nicolosi, Robert Richard 
Means, Rae-Ann Jennifer 
Cummings, Robert Andrew 
Hagen, Frances Jacquelin 
Lattuca, Joseph Michael 
Hayward, Brenda Elizabeth 
Berrigan, Roseann Simone 
Philbin, David Anthony 
Terris, Anne 
MacLaren, Donna Marie 
O'Brien, Maura Kennedy 
Biron, Jonathan Carlisle 
Hitchcock, Alec Kimball 
Petrocchi, Dina 

Fohl, Jeffrey 
Nelson, Susan Barrett 
Bernard, Jill Anne 
Wollam, Katrina Ann 
Courtright, Jason Francis 
Cuglietta, Darlene 
Konwisarz, Dorothy Michele 
Kubik, Catherine Davis 
Whitaker, Valerie 
Davis, Frandon Scott 
Bukowski, Stefanie Lynn 
Blum, Leopold Bernard, IV 
Doran, Jennifer 
Harrington, Daniel Laurence 
O'Sullivan, Brian Paul 



James E. and Marjorie A. Caisse 
Paul and Regina E. Murphy 

Donald R. and Nancy A. Pederson 
Peter A. and Paula J. McPherson 
David G. and Mary E. Byrne 
Raymond A. and Donna L. Dodge 
John D. and Sandra J. Hanson 
Griffith L., Ill and Pamela Phillips 
Anders P. and Karen A. Soroka 
Abel L. and Anna M. Carrano 
Norman L. and Gail J. Crerie -— 
Robert E. and Katharine R. Doll 
Mervyn J. and Linda L. Bussiere 
Edward D., Jr. and Joyce L. Mueller 
Roger F. and Joan E. Sunstein 
Robert G. and Sally S. Reed 
Frank A. and Sara-Ann Sarno 
Joseph H. and Jacqueline Seeckts 
John W. and Susan S. Stevenson 
Robert W. and Linda L. Christiansen 
William H., Jr. and Loretta M. Weir 

Thomas D. and Mary A. Tervo 
Richard, Jr. and Donna N. Cutter 
Richard F. and Sandra M. MacLeod 
Robert J. and Kathleen B. Cross 
Brian J. and Dorothy E. Sheehan 
Gerard E. and Marilyn D. DiLieto 
Donald W. and Marilyn Cole 
Dennes P. and Kay J. Gilbertson 
Harrington, Jr., and Gail S. Harrington 
Bernard A. and Mary A. Simeone 
Richard D. and Candace B. Hall 
William G. and Shirley V. Waters 

Thomas E. and Cynthia E. Little 
Lee F. and Barbara A. Maxwell 
Robert T. and Anne M. McMullen 
Eldon M. and Marianne Hagerty 
Richard T. and Peggy L. Talbott 
Donald C. and Mary R. Kellett 
Robert O. and Helen S. Wallace 
Ross M. and Jacquelin L. Marty 
Rosario L. and Ann M. Galvin 
Russell E. and Donna J. Hoey 
Maurice P. and Gertrude H. Kenney 
William E. and Jane E. Nash 
William C. and Patricia A. LeClair 
Robert B. and Brenda J. Fannuzzio 
Richard P. and Ann L. McNiff 
Richard D. and Phyllis R. Carbonneau 
Frank L. and Elizabeth Joyce 
Pio J. and Eleanor J. D'Agostino 

Timothy and Nancy L. Hattox 

Warren C. and Brenda J. Gill 

Paul R, and Beverly D. Botelho 

John S. and Mariegold M. Gatrall-Garland 

Charles E. and Ann M. Buckley 

Angelo J. and Diane N. Pacy 

Michael A. and Deardra J. Costello 

James and Elizabeth Buckley 

Jack D. and Dorothy M. Brown 

Edward C. and Sandra Lawrence 

Paul J. and Judith P. Wilcox 

Leopold B., Ill and Elizabeth A. Smith 

Robert W. and Marie L. Mitchell 

Joseph R., Jr. and Alice M. O'Donoghue 

Paul B. and Sally J. Herpich 



61 



k 



Date 



Place 



Name of Child 



Name of Parents 



July 


29 


Concord 


July 


30 


Concord 


Aug. 


2 


Cambridge 


Aug. 


2 


Concord 


Aug. 


3 


Concord 


Aug. 


5 


Groton 


Aug. 


6 


Concord 


Aug. 


8 


Cambridge 


Aug. 


9 


Concord 


Aug. 


11 


Concord 


Aug. 


13 


Concord 


Aug. 


14 


Concord 


Aug. 


18 


Concord 


Aug. 


23 


Concord 


Aug. 


25 


Lowell 


Aug. 


27 


Concord 


Aug. 


28 


Concord 


Aug. 


29 


Concord 


Aug. 


30 


Concord 


Aug. 


31 


Concord 


Sept. 


4 


Concord 


Sept. 


5 


Concord 


Sept. 


7 


Concord 


Sept. 


11 


Concord 


Sept. 


13 


Framingham 


Sept. 


20 


Chelsea 


Sept. 


21 


Concord 


Sept. 


23 


Boston 


Sept. 


26 


Concord 


Sept. 


26 


Concord 


Sept. 


26 


Waltham 


Sept. 


26 


Concord 


Sept. 


27 


Concord 


Sept. 


27 


Concord 


Oct. 


1 


Concord 


Oct. 


1 


Concord 


Oct. 


3 


Concord 


Oct. 


4 


Concord 


Oct. 


5 


Concord 


Oct. 


5 


Concord 


Oct. 


6 


Concord 


Oct. 


8 


Framingham 


Oct. 


9 


Concord 


Oct. 


10 


Concord 


Oct. 


14 


Concord 


Oct. 


14 


Concord 


Oct. 


15 


Concord 


Oct. 


20 


Concord 


Oct. 


22 


Concord 


Oct. 


23 


Concord 


Oct. 


24 


Arlington 


Oct. 


25 


Boston 


Oct. 


25 


Boston 


Oct. 


25 


Concord 


Oct. 


29 


Concord 


Oct. 


30 


Concord 


Nov. 


1 


Woburn 


Nov. 


2 


Concord 


Nov. 


2 


Waltham 


Nov. 


4 


Concord 


Nov. 


5 


Concord 


Nov. 


5 


Concord 


Nov. 


8 


Concord 


Nov. 


9 


Concord 


Nov. 


10 


Concord 


Nov. 


13 


Waltham 



Nickerson, Scott Robert 
Evans, Jonathan Paul 

Januszkiewicz, Russell Edward 
Nolan, Merlyn Richardson 
Melus, Andrea Fontaine 
Dolan, Richard Edward, III 
Cormier, Charlene Ann 
March, Michael 
Megee, Nancy Lynne 
Raso, Michael John 
White, Jessica 
Bongiorno, Alyssa Mary 
Hanna, Matthew Edward 
Gaetano, Arianne Marie 
Guenard, Audrey Lee 
Rocco, Michael Timothy, Jr. 
Lee, Jennifer Ann 
Glenn, Robert John, Jr. 
Condon, Richard Perry 
Harris, Matthew Baker 

Kiklis, David Charles 
Kirby, Maurice William, III 
Mottershead, Karen Kelly 
Moore, Devon Ingalls 
Shurling, Kimberly Anne 
Galligan, Lisa Ann 
Elder, Joyce 

Nordstrom, Gerald Allen, Jr. 
Flerra, Louis Alexander, II 
Gluckler, Peter Edward, Jr. 
Pierson, Erik Allen 
Prescott, Randell Fdward 
Pattee, Jamison Timothy 
Spurr, Neal Alfred 

Crane, Cynthia Elizabeth 
O'Connell, Karen Lisa 
Steinbach, Patricia Jo 
Evans, Linda Midori 
Bryant, John William 
Lennon, Jason Matthew 
Vanaria, Paul Louis Joseph 
Cole, Renee Ann 
Albertelli, Joanne Marie 
Monti, Anthony Arnold, Jr. 
Morehouse, William Charles 
Oliveto, Francis Michael, Jr. 
Ivanov, Mark Nelson 
McKenna, Mary Elizabeth 
Priest, Bonnie Jean 
Duarte, Diane Joyce 
Reich, Laurie Jean 
Bogusz, Christine Mary 
Bogus z, Diane Monica 
Knowles, Stephanie Kristin 
Cronin, Edward Joseph 
Neelon, Sarah Elizabeth 

Look, Jennifer Lyn 
Gibson, Lara Catherine 
Graves, Lore Ann 
Harrington, Neal Andrew 
Umbsen, Gordon Harvey 
Umbsen, Margaret Elizabeth 
Clark, Timothy Elliott 
Lantz, Terry Jonathan 
Freeman, Scott Sturtevant 
Hurley, Peter Headen 



Robert C. and Judith L. Pontbriand 
Hilary and Eunice V. Klingensmith 

Richard F. and Patricia E. Barbiere 
Gaillard R. and Meryl E. Richardson 
John J. and Evelyn F. DeLuca 
Richard E. and Anita F. Comeau 
Gerard J. and Huberte M. LeBlanc 
Frederick G. and Ellin P. Barry 
James F. and Sally A. Milligan 
Vincent F. and Theresa M. Pallizzolo 
Charles W., Ill and Sandra J. Makas 
Anthony J. and Diane T. DiMare 
Harold E. and Anita G. Larmore 
Leonard F. and Suzanne H. Kenney 
Arthur H. and Marlene M. Chateauneuf 
Michael T. and Elizabeth Y. McCartney 
Douglas K. and Dolores M. Baranik 
Robert J. and Katherine M. Carroll 
Kenneth A. and Patricia A. Sanders 
Philip A. and Lorna May Clark 

Charles H. and Elaine J. Leanos 
Maurice W., Jr. and Pauline J. Morin 
Joseph H., Jr. and Dorothy L. Boisvert 
Norman H., Jr. and Martha A. Gowell 
Wayne M. and Margaret Lombardi 
David R. and Patricia M. Muncie 
Richard B. and Sandra B. Zorn 
Gerald A. and Carol Morse 
Paul L. and Eudora A. Troupe 
Peter E. and Rosemary Frattalone 
Dale R. and Ruth J. Voehl 
Donald R. and Delores E. Stimmerman 
Timothy H. and Gail Perry 
Alfred E. and Muriel L. Monsen 

Robert K. and Emma R. Freeman 
Robert E. and Martha A. Hurlbert 
Matthew T. and Doris J. McCarthy 
Robert E., Jr. and Lois E. Herr 
George S. and Joan M. Kramer 
John L. and Joan F. Booth 
Orlando A. and Lillian M. Bernard 
and Maureen T. Boyd 
and Joan M. Maloney 
and Doris B. Fontaine 
and Gertrude M. Hartmann 
and Jackelen L. Stone 
Alex and Elizabeth J. Smith 
James L., Jr. and Marie T. Dunne 
and Faith A. Nelson 
and Claire F. McLane 
and Catherine A. Dougherty 
and Gertrude D. Cairns 
and Gertrude D. Cairns 



Patrick C. 
Richard F. 
Anthony A. 
Charles A. 
Francis M. 



Gordon W. 

Douglas A 

William B 

Edwin E. 

Edwin E. 

Malcolm C. and Judith Andrea Cornwall 

Peter J. and Helen E. Scollins 

David E. and Patricia A. Rabby 

Frank M. and Carol A. Wallace 
Gordon S. and Brigitte M. Bender 
William B. and Agnes P. Keplinger 
Walter S., Jr. and Kathleen C. Burke 
Gustave H. and Margaret J. Sherman 
Gustave H. and Margaret J. Sherman 
Laurence E., Jr. and Judith R. Carpenter 
Richard A. and Margaret M. Rio 
Theodore L., Jr. and Susan Boynton 
David and Carole McGovern 



62 



Date 



Place 



Name of Child 



Name of Parents 



Nov. 


16 


Concord 


Nov. 


18 


Concord 


Nov. 


19 


Concord 


Nov. 


27 


Concord 


Dec. 


4 


Concord 


Dec. 


10 


Concord 


Dec. 


12 


Concord 


Dec. 


12 


Concord 


Dec. 


16 


Concord 


Dec. 


17 


Concord 


Dec. 


18 


Concord 


Dec. 


18 


Concord 


Dec. 


19 


Concord 


Dec. 


27 


Concord 


Dec. 


27 


Concord 



von Jess, Thomas Joseph 
Poutenis, Christopher Richard 
Jones, Stephen 
Macdonald, Steven 

Burns, Geoffrey Michael 
Usher, Elizabeth Anne 
Mahoney, David Philip 
Sokolowski, Kimberly Ann 
Berlied, Thomas Irving, Jr. 
Harris, Roger Alans on 
Bourque, Kevin Michael 
Lynch, Kerry Bridget 
Howe, Scott Jeffrey 
Bonk, Stephanie Jayne 
Mancuso, James Joseph 



John G. and Wilma C. Gundersdorf 
Richard V. and Priscilla A. Robinson 
Raymond J. and Patricia L. Brophy 
David and Ann S. Dyer 

Jay B. and Jane L. Gottfried 
David F. and Adrienne M. Sharkey 
David F. and Phyllis A. Scott 
Paul and Eileen M. Wilson 
Thomas I. and Mary T. Gillis 
Ronald A. and Jane C. Newland 
Paul F. and Glorious G. Brown 
William P. and Elizabeth Moynihan 
Richard N. and Sandra L. Seller 
Bonk, Basil A. and Linda M. Hardy 
John J. and Anna S. Mitchell 



DOG LICENSES 



ALL DOG LICENSES EXPIRE MARCH 3 1, 1968. 
DOGS MUST BE LICENSED ON OR BEFORE 
APRIL 1ST OR THE OWNERS OR KEEPERS 
THEREOF ARE LIABLE TO A FINE. THE LAW 
APPLIES TO ALL DOGS THREE MONTHS OLD 
OR OVER, REGARDLESS OF TIME OF YEAR 
OWNERSHIP IS ACQUIRED. NO TAX BILLS ARE 
SENT TO OWNERS OF DOGS. 



REPORT OF DOG LICENSES 
ISSUED IN 1967 



897 Licenses $ 2. 00 

111 Licenses 5. 00 

5 Licenses 10. GO 

4 Licenses 25. 00 

2 Licenses 50. 00 

32 Duplicate Tags .25 

5 Transfer Licenses .25 

Paid to Town Treasurer 



$1 


7 94 


00 




555 


00 




50 


00 




100. 


00 




100. 


00 




8. 


00 




1. 


25 


$2, 


608. 


25 



DOG OFFICER 



I herewith submit my report for Dog Officer for the year ending 1967 

Calls and complaints handled 228 

Stray dogs picked up 2 6 

Dogs returned to owners 21 

Dogs disposed of 5 

Carl W. Flint 



63 



TOWN ELECTION 



March 6, 1967 



Pet. 1 



Pet. 2 



Pet. 3 



Total 



Whole number of votes cast 

MODERATOR, One Year 

John W. Putnam 

James Edward Kinsley 

Blanks 

TOWN CLERK, One Year 

Charles M. MacRae 

Blanks 

SELECTMAN, Three Years 

Frank W. Putnam, 111 

William C. Sawyer 

Blanks . 

ASSESSORS, Three Years 

Carl C. Flint 

Blanks 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WELFARE, Three Years 

Patience H. MacPherson 

Blanks 

TREASURER and COLLECTOR, One Year 

Wm. Henry Soar 

Blanks 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE, Three Years 

Edwin Richter 

Basil A. Bonk 

John A. Miner 

James W. Myers 

Edith D. Stowell 

Blanks 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE, One Year (To fill vacancy) 

Harry B. Morse 

Blanks ^ 

CONSTABLES, One Year 

Chauncey R. Fenton, Jr 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy ' . 

David J. Allen 

Blanks 

CEMETERY COMMISIONER, Three Years 

Howard F. Jones 

Blanks 

BOARD OF HEALTH, Three Years 

Daniel J. O'Connor, Jr. 

Blanks 

TRUSTEE OF MEMORIAL LIBRARY, Three Years 

Grace Krasnick 

Mary Jane S. O'Neil 

Blanks 

PLANNING BOARD, Five Years 

Edward A. Chambers 

Stanley E. Dale 

Blanks 

TREE WARDEN, One Year 

Franklin H. Charter 

Blanks 



445 



422 



689 



1556 



280 


224 


348 


852 


159 


187 


330 


676 


6 


11 


11 


28 


418 


385 


641 


1444 


27 


37 


48 


112 


182 


178 


313 


673 


258 


233 


362 


853 


5 


11 


14 


30 


409 


386 


648 


1443 


36 


36 


41 


113 


386 


352 


611 


1349 


59 


70 


78 


207 


410 


378 


636 


1424 


35 


44 


53 


132 


304 


287 


467 


1058 


64 


71 


75 


210 


95 


115 


266 


476 


113 


113 


164 


390 


226 


163 


2 93 


682 


88 


95 


113 


296 


399 


373 


631 


1403 


46 


49 


58 


153 


398 


365 


631 


1394 


391 


351 


608 


1350 


356 


305 


529 


1190 


635 


667 


988 


2290 


409 


373 


631 


1413 


36 


49 


58 


143 


402 


3 62 


624 


1388 


43 


60 


65 


168 


150 


152 


186 


488 


244 


215 


42 8 


887 


51 


55 


75 


181 


193 


149 


382 


724 


164 


197 


208 


569 


88 


76 


99 


263 


414 


376 


641 


1431 


31 


46 


48 


125 



64 



248- 


174 


315 


737 


192 


244 


363 


799 


5 


4 


11 


20 



QUESTION NO. 1 Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year nineteen 
hundred and sixty-six, entitled "An Act establishing a Select- 
men-Manager form of government for the town of Acton," be 
accepted? 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

QUESTION NO. 2 

Shall the town extend contributory group hospital, surgical 
and medical insurance to elderly persons retired from the 
service of the town and to their dependents with fifty percent 
of the premium cost, a portion of the administrative expense 
and the payment of a surcharge or subsidiary rate to be paid 
by the town? 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

QUESTION NO. 3 

Shall the town vote to accept the provisions of section six C 
of chapter forty of the General Laws, which authorizes cities 
and towns to appropriate money for the removal of snow and 
ice from private ways wherein open to public use"? 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 



206 


197 


358 


761 


211 


2 05 


293 


709 


28 


20 


38 


86 



230 


226 


372 


828 


185 


177 


291 


653 


30 


19 


26 


75 



65 



ASSESSORS 



The Board of Assessors and their very capable staff, without whom it would be impossible to operate 
our office efficiently, have had another busy year. A total of 32 8 building permits were issued during the 
year and we are now in the process of assigning values to these and other real estate and personal properties 
subject to taxation in the Town. There are approximately one hundred properties carried over from 1967 
that must be rechecked, classified and priced before our 1968 valuation can be determined. We refer to 
properties that were in various stages of completion as of January 1, 1967 and to changes in house lots and 
streets during 1967. 

The greater than anticipated increase in total valuation of the properties subject to taxation in Acton as 
of January 1, 1967, resulted in keeping the tax rate down and we were happy to find that only a $2.00 increase 
in the rate was necessary to meet the expenditures voted during 1966. 

It now appears that the increase in valuation during 1967 will be between three and four million dollars. 
Approximately one fourth of this increase will be in the form of tax exemipt property. In consultation with the 
Department of Corporations and Taxation we have been advised that their estimate of equalized valuation for 
the Town of Acton for 1968 will approximate eighty-four million. This equalized valuation is the basis on 
which school aid is computed. 

Taxes Assessed as Follows: 

Buildings Exclusive of Land $54, 683, 985. 00 

Land 16,724,525.00 

Personal 3, 010, 465. 00 

Total Valuation $74,418,975.00 

Valuation - January 1, 1966 70,309, 795. 00 

Increase in Valuation $ 4, 109, 180. 00 

Rate of Taxation - $31.00 per $1000 

Real Estate $2,213,663.88 

Personal Property 93, 324. 42 

Total Taxes Assessed $ 2,306,988.30 

Amount of Money Raised: 

State Parks and Reservations $ 9, 992. 63 

State Audit & Municipal Accounts 2, 942. 06 

State Assessment System 407. 52 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 1, 043. 55 

County Tax 80, 5 90. 45 

Tuberculosis Hospital Grant 1, 313. 98 
Town Grant 2,150,698.11 

Overlay 60, 000. 00 



$ 2, 306, 988. 30 



Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise 

Number of Vehicles Assessed - 7163 

Commissioners Value of Motor Vehicles & Trailers $ 5, 868, 850. 00 

Rate of Excise - $66.00 per $1000 

Total Excise $ 339,540.94 

Added Excise of 1966 24,022.86 

Number of Vehicles added 1966 Excise - 965 

Value of Vehicles - added excise 1, 076, 690. 00 



Dewey E. Boatman 

Carl C. Flint 

John E. Dunphy, Jr. 

Board of Assessors 



66 



TOWN MEETINGS 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, 
MARCH 13, 1967 AND ADJOURNED SESSIONS MARCH 2 AND 2 7, 1967 

Article 1. 

To choosy all necessary Town Officers and Committees and fix the salaries and compensation of all the 
elective officers of the Town. 



ELECTED 
ELECTED 
ELECTED 
ELECTED 
ELECTED 



Barbara Nylander Trustee of the Citizens Library Association of West Acton for three years. 

Richard A. Lowden Trustee of Acton Firemen's Relief Fund for three years. 

Thelma L. Boatman Trustee of Goodnow Fund for three years. 

Helen B. Wood Trustee of Elizabeth White Fund for three years. 

James B. Wilson Trustee of West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund for three years. 



MOTION: That the compensation of elected officers of the Town of Acton for the calendar year 1967 be as 
follows: 



Moderator 



$20. 00 per each night per meeting 



Board of Selectmen: 
Chairman . . . 

Clerk 

Member . . . . 



Town Treasurer and Collector . 
Town Clerk 



Board of Assessprs: 
Chairman . . . 

Clerk 

Member . . . . 



$ 750.00 
650. 00 
650. 00 

7, 541. 00 

2, 310. 00 



1, 600. 00 
1, 200. 00 
1,200. 00 



Board of Public Welfare: 

Chairman 

Member 

Member 



Board of Health: 
Chairman . 
Member . . 
Member . . 



$150. 00 
100. 00 
100. 00 



150. 00 
100. 00 
100. 00 



Tree Warden: At the rate of $2.90 per hour plus 
$.75 cents per hour for the use of 
his truck. 



VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the rate for the Tree Warden to $3.00 per hour. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: That the compensation of elected officers of the Town of Acton for the calendar 
year 1967 be as moved and amended above. 

Article 2. 

To see if the Town will accept the several reports of the Town Officers and Boards, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the several reports of the Town Officers and Boards. 

Article 3. REPORTS 

To hear and act upon the reports of any Committees chosen at any previous Town Meeting that have not 
already reported. 



VOTED: To take no action. 



Article 4. BYLAW 



VOTED: To amend Section 7 of the Town Bylaws, entitled "Personnel Bylaw for Wage and Salary Determi- 
nation and Administration" by increasing by an approximate 5% the figures in Schedule A, Schedule B and 
Schedule C, to be effective April 1, 1967; a copy of the revised figures to be submitted by the Personnel 
Board to the Town Clerk at its earliest convenience. 

Article 5. 

To see what sums of money the Town will vote to raise and appropriate to defray the necessary expenses of 
the several departments of the Town and determine how the same shall be raised. 

VOTED: That the 1967 budget schedule as appearing in Article 5 be raised and appropriated for each item 
as indicated except that $5,428.50 be appropriated from library receipts reserved for appropriation for 
Memorial Library use: 



67 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



General Government (cont'd, ) 



Moderator: 

1. Salary 

2. Expenses 

Finance Committee: 

3. Expenses 

Selectmen: 

4. Salaries 

5. Expenses 

6. Legal Services 

7. Legal Service Expenses 

8. Appraisals 

Town Office Clerical Staff: 

9. Salaries 

Engineering Department: 

10. Salaries and Wages 

11. Expenses 

Town Accovmtant: 

12. Salary 

13. Expenses 

Town Treasurer and Collector: 

14. Salary 

15. Expenses 

Town Assessors: 

16. Salaries 

17. Expenses 

18. Capital Outlay 

Town Clerk: 

19. Salary 

20. Expenses 

21. 1965 State Census 



160. 00 
25. 00 



200. 00 



Town Report Connmittee: 
35. Expenses 



$ 3,000.00 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT $151, 036. 00 
PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 









Police Department: 








10, 


050. 


00 


36. 


Salaries and Wages $ 


97, 


591. 


00 


5, 


075. 


00 


37. 


Expenses 


13, 


787. 


00 


7, 


000. 
500. 


00 
00 


38. 


Capital Outlay 


1, 


300. 


00 


1, 


000. 


00 


Fire Department: 














39. 


Salaries and Wages 


94, 


009. 


00 








40. 


Expenses 


40, 


625. 


00 


42, 


394. 


00 


41. 


Capital Outlay 


1, 


250. 


00 








Sealer of Weights and Measures: 








13, 


759. 


00 


42. 


Salary and Travel 




450. 


00 


2, 


400. 


00 


43. 

Insect 


Expenses 
Pest Control: 




40. 


00 


2, 


300. 


00 


44. 


Wages 


3, 


915. 


00 




250. 


00 


45. 

Town 


Expenses 
Forest Committee: 


2, 


000. 


00 


7, 


541. 


00 


46. 


Maintenance 




100. 


00 


3. 


500. 


00 


Tree 1 


Department: 














47. 


Wages 


3, 


610. 


00 


4, 


000. 


00 


48. 


Expenses 


1, 


900. 


00 


2, 


269. 


00 


Wire ] 


[nspector: 














49. 


Wages and Travel 


3, 


000. 


00 








50. 


Expenses 




25. 


00 


2, 


310. 


00 














800. 


00 


Inspec 


;tor of Gas Piping and Appliances 














51. 


Wages 


1, 


500. 


00 



Elections and Registration: 

22. Salaries and Wages 

23. Expenses 

24. Capital Outlay 

Planning Board: 

25. Expenses 

Personnel Board: 

26. Expenses 

Board of Appeals: 

27. Expenses 

Industrial Development Commission: 

28. Expenses 

Conservation Commission: 
2 9. Expenses 

Archives Committee: 

30. Expenses 

Public Ceremonies and Celebrations 
Committee: 

31. Expenses 

Buildings and Grounds: 

32. Salaries and V/ages 

33. Expenses 

34. Capital Outlay 



500. 00 
500. 00 
200.00 



1, 000. 00 

1, 300. 00 

55. 00 

250. 00 

200. 00 

25. 00 



1, 


250. 


00 


4, 


835. 


00 


24. 


178. 


00 


2, 


210. 


00 



Building Inspector and Agent for 
Enforcement of Zoning Bylaws: 

52. Salary and Wages 

53. Expenses 

Dog Officer: 

54. Wages and Travel 

55. Expenses 

Building Committee: 

56. Expenses 

57. Capital Outlay 

Civil Defense: 

58. Expenses 

TOTAL PROTECTION OF PERSONS 
AND PROPERTY 

HIGHWAYS 

5 9. Salaries 

60. Expenses 

61. Street Lighting 

62. Capital Outlay 

TOTAL HIGHWAYS 



7 


,734. 


00 


L 


,200. 


00 




579. 


00 




75. 


00 




50. 


00 




100. 


00 




400. 


00 


$275, 


240. 


00 


$ 66, 


819. 


00 


102, 


236. 


00 


17, 


000. 


00 


5, 


018. 


00 


$191. 


073. 


00 



68 



HEALTH & SANITATION 



Libraries (cont'd.) 



Health and Sanitation: 

63. Salaries 

64. Expenses 

65. Garbage Collection 

Inspector of Animals: 
6 6. Wages 

67. Expenses 

Plumbing Inspector: 

68. Wages 

TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 
CHARITIES 

District and Local Welfare: 

69. Administration Salaries 

70. Public Assistance 

TOTAL CHARITIES 

VETERANS AID 

Veterans Services: 

71. Salary 

72. Expenses 

73. Aid 

TOTAL VETERANS AID 

EDUCATION 

Local Schools: 

74. Instruction 

75. Plant Operation & 

Maintenance 

76. Transportation 

77. Non- Instructional Services 

78. Administration 

79. Blanchard Auditorium 

80. Capital Outlay 

81. Contingency Fund 



West Acton Library: 



$ 


15, 


422. 00 


96. Salary and Wages 


$ 


1, 084. 


00 




13, 


501. 00 


97. Expenses 




758. 


00 




21, 


000. 00 
















TOTAL LIBRARIES 


L 


49, 178. 


00 






166. 00 


RECREATION 












30. 00 


Playgrounds : 














98. Wages 


$ 


4, 791. 


00 




3, 


000.00 


99. Expenses 
100. Capital Outlay 




2, 650. 
2,210 


00 
00 


1 


53, 


119.00 
















TOTAL RECREATION 


L 


9, 651. 


uu 



1, 775. 00 
60, OOP. 00 

$ 61, 775. 00 



$ 2,031.00 

275. 00 

10, 000. 00 

$ 12, 306. 00 



$657, 036.00 

77, 257. 00 
80, 527.00 

10, 500. 00 
21, 725. 00 

11, 150. 00 
4,397. 00 

25, 000. 00 



Total 


Local Schools 


$887, 


592. 


00 


Regional Schools: 








82. 


Instruction 


$645, 


137. 


00 


83. 


Plant Operation &; 










Maintenance 


80, 


718. 


00 


84. 


Transportation 


13, 


414. 


00 


85. 


Non-Instructional Services 


25, 


765. 


00 


86. 


Administration 


23, 


514. 


00 


87. 


Blanchard Auditorium 


6, 


569. 


00 


88. 


Capital Outlay 


7, 


234. 


00 


89. 


Athletic Fund 


11, 


250. 


00 


90. 


Contingency Fund 


22, 


165 


00 


91. 


School Lunch Fund 


4, 


530 


00 


Total Regional Schools 


$840, 


296 


00 


TOTAL EDUCATION 


$1,727, 


888 


00 



LIBRARIES 



Memorial Library: 

92. Salary and Wages 

93. Expenses 

94. Books 

95. Capital Outlay 



$ 24, 361. 00 

8, 975. 00 

13, 000. 00 

1, 000. 00 



CEMETERIES 

Cemeteries: 

101. Salaries and Wages 

102. Expenses 

103. Capital Outlay 

TOTAL CEMETERIES 

INSURANCE 

Insurance: 

104. Workmen's Compensation 

105. Surety Bond 

106. Fire and Public Liability 
Insurance for Town Bldgs. 

107. Boiler and Machinery 

108. Motor Vehicle Liability 

109. Money and Securities 

110. Group Health 

111. Fire Fighters Insurance 

112. Public Liability 



TOTAL INSURANCE 



PENSIONS 



Pension Fund: 
113. Expenses 

TOTAL PENSION 



$ 23, 706. 00 

5, 070. 00 

675. 00 

$ 29,451. 00 



6, 000. 00 
650. 00 

10, 000. 00 
1, 100. 00 
4, 320. 00 

13, 000. 00 
425. 00 



$ 35, 495. 00 



$ 25, 500. 00 
$ 25, 500. 00 



MATURING DEBT AND INTEREST 



Regional School: 

114. Maturing Debt 

115. Interest 

Julia McCarthy School: 

116. Maturing Debt 

117. Interest 

Julia McCarthy School Addition: 

118. Maturing Debt 

119. Interest 

Florence E. Merriam School: 
12 0. Maturing Debt 

121. Interest 

South Acton Fire Station: 

122. Maturing Debt 

123. Interest 



$ 51, 261. 00 
76, 827. 00 



15, 000. 00 
1, 600. 00 



10, 000. 00 
260. 00 



40, 000. 00 
15, 840. 00 



69 



Maturing Debt and Interest (cont'd.) 



Chapter 81 and 90 Highways: 

124. Maturing Debt 

125. Interest 

Elm Street School Land: 

126. Maturing Debt 

127. Interest 



Library Addition: 

134. Maturing Debt 

135. Interest 

Anticipation of Revenue Notes: 

136. Interest 



$ 25, 000. 00 
6, 750. 00 



5, 000. 00 



Elm Street School: #1 
128. Maturing Debt 
12 9. Interest 



$ 40, 000. 00 
23, 975. 00 



TOTAL MATURING DEBT 
AND INTEREST 



$363, 193. 00 



Elm Street School: #2 

130. Maturing Debt 

131. Interest 

Police Station: 

132. Maturing Debt 

133. Interest 



30, 000. 00 



20, 000. 00 
1, 680. 00 



TOTAL BUDGET 

Appropriated from 
Library Receipts 

Total to be raised and 
appropriated 



I, 984, 905. 00 



5,428. 50 



$2, 979, 476. 50 



SPECIAL ARTICLES 



Article 11. Grader $32,000.00 

Article 23. Land for Sewerage Disposal Purposes 31, 000. 00 

Article 25. Sidewalks 2,500.00 

Article 26. Town Administration Study Committee 400. 00 

Article 27. School Zone 1,000.00 

Article 29. Fence - Gardiner Field 810. 00 

Article 30. Tennis Courts 12, 000. 00 

Article 31. 1966 Unpaid Bills 4, 243. 03 

Article 32. Emergency Operating Center 1,000.00 

Article 37. Vocational Tuition 7,000.00 

Article 42. Conservation Fund 25, 000. 00 

Article 45. Council on Aging 2 00.00 

Article 46. Board of Health - Walden Guidance Assn. Inc. 4, 000. 00 

Article 48. Truck - Cemetery Dept. 2,675.00 

Article 50. Larrabee Land — Cemetery 1, 250. 00 

TOTAL TO BE RAISED AND APPROPRIATED 
UNDER SPECIAL ARTICLES 



$125, 078. 03 



TRANSFERS 



From 



To 



Article 5. 
Article 8. 
Article 9. 
Article 10. 
Article 49. 

Article 51. 
Article 51. 

Article 52. 



Library Receipts 
Surplus Revenue 
Surplus Revenue 
Stabilization Fund 
Cemetery Land Fund 

Surplus Revenue 
Overlay Surplus 

Reserve 
Free Cash 



Memorial Library 

Central Street 

Highways 

Elm Street School #2 

New Sections 

Woodlawn Cemetery 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Fund 
Budget 



$ 5,428.50 

6, 900. 00 

45, 700. 00 

100, 000. 00 

2, 000. 00 
10, 000. 00 

10, 000. 00 
70, 000. 00 



TOTAL TRANSFERS 



$250, 028. 50 



Article 10. Elm Street School #2 



BORROW 



$1,249,450. 00 



70 



SUMMARY 



Budget (R. & A.) 

Special Articles (R. h A.) 

Special Article Transfers 



Borrow 



GRAND TOTAL 



$2, 979,476. 50 
125, 078. 03 
250, 028. 50 

$3, 354, 583. 03 

1, 249,450. 00 



$4, 604, 033. 03 



Article 6. BYLAW 

To see if the Town will amend Section 7 of the Town Bylaws, entitled "Personnel Bylaws for Wage and Sal- 
ary Determination and Administration", Schedule B, by deleting S9 3901, J7 3902, 3903 and 3904, and J6 
3 905 in their entirety and substituting: 



Position 


Work 


Minimum 










Maximum 


Grade 


Number 
3 901 


Hours 
40 


Step 1 
2.50 


Step 2 
2. 62 


Step 3 
2. 74 




Step 4 
2. 87 




Step 5 


S9 




3. 01 








100. 00 


104. 80 


109. 60 




114.80 




120.40 








435. 00 


455.88 


476. 76 




499.38 




523.74 








5, 220. 00 


5,470. 56 


5, 721. 12 


5 


992. 56 


6, 


284. 88 


J7 


3902 


40 


2.20 


2.30 


2.40 




2. 52 




2.63 




3903 


40 


88. 00 


92. 00 


96. 00 




100.80 




105.20 




3 904 


40 


382. 80 


400. 80 


417. 60 




438. 48 




457. 62 








4, 593. 60 


4,402.40 


5,011.20 


5 


261. 76 


5 


491.44 


J6 


3 905 


40 


2. 06 


2. 16 


2.25 




2.36 




2.47 








82.40 


86.40 


90. 00 




94.40 




98. 80 








358.44 


375.84 


391.50 




410.64 




429. 78 








4,301. 28 


4,510. 08 


4, 698. 00 


4 


927. 68 


5 


157.36 



To be effective April 1, 1967 the following temporary hourly rates will be in effect until the rates in schedule 
B of the Personnel Bylaw equal or exceed said temporary hourly rates, at which time the rates listed in 
schedule B will supersede said temporary hourly rates. 



Position 


Work 


Minimum 








Maximum 


Grade 


Number 


Hours 


Step 1 


Step 2 


Step 3 


Step 4 


Step 5 


S9 


3901 




2. 75 


2.88 


3. 01 


3. 16 


3.31 


J7 


3 902 
3903 
3 904 




2.42 


2.53 


2. 64 


2. 77 


2.89 



J6 3905 2.27 

or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 



2. 38 



2. 48 



2. 60 



2. 72 



Article 7. BORROW MONEY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: That the Town authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to borrow from time to time in acticipation of the revenue for the financial years beginning Jan- 
uary 1, 1967 and January 1, 1968, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
4, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44,' Section 17. 

Article 8. SURPLUS REVENUE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from Surplus Revenue the sum of $6, 900. 00, for Chapter 90 con- 
struction on Central Street, in an Easterly direction about 1,200 feet from the Boston and Maine Railroad 
crossing, said money to be used in conjunction with $6,900.00 to be allotted by the County and $13,800.00 to 
be allotted by the State. 



71 



Article 9. SURPLUS REVENUE 

To see if the Town will appropriate from the Surplus Revenue Account the amount of the State's and County's 
allotments for highways under Chapters 81 and 90; provided that the reimbursement be credited back to the 
Surplus Revenue Account, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To appropriate from the Surplus Revenue Account the amount of $22,000.00 as the State's allotment 
for Chapter 81 Maintenance, the amount of $1,500.00 as the State's allotment for Chapter 90 Maintenance, the 
amount of $1,500.00 as the County's allotment for Chapter 90 Maintenance, the amount of $13,800.00 as the 
State's allotment for Chapter 90 New Construction, and the amount of $6,900.00 as the County's allotment 
for Chapter 90 New Construction; provided that the reimbursement be credited back to the Surplus Revenue 
Account. 

VOTED: That consideration of Article 10 be deferred until the next session of this meeting. 

Article 11. NEW GRADER 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $32,000.00 for the purchase of a new grader for the Highway 
Department, and authorize the Board of Selectmen to trade-in, sell or otherwise dispose of the old grader. 

Article 12. NEW ROLLER 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $13,000.00, 
or any other sum, for the purchase of a new roller for the Highway Department, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 13. COMMEMORATIVE MONUMENT 

To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase and erect, on a temporary site, in the 
Town Common, a commemorative monument to the men and women of Acton who have served their Country 
in time of war, such monument to be transferred at a later date to such site as may be designated by the 
Town as a living memorial to the Veterans of Acton and raise and appropriate, or appropriate from avail- 
able funds, the sum of $2,700.00, or any other sum, therefor, or take any other action relative thereto. 

MOTION: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,700.00 to purchase and erect, on a temporary site in the 
Town Common, a commemorative monument to be moved, at a later date, to such a site as may be desig- 
nated by the Town as a living memorial to the Veterans of Acton. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 14. TOWN FOREST 

To see if the Town will rename the present Town Forest located East of Route 2 and shown in the Town 
Atlas as parcels 12 and 16, sheet D-3, as the Acton Town Forest and Veterans' Memorial Recreation Area, 
and instruct the Recreation Commission to submit plans for developing the Town Forest as a living memo- 
rial to all Acton Veterans who have served their Town and Country in the armed forces, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To rename the present Town Forest located East of Route 2 and shown in the Town Atlas as parcels 
12 and 16, sheet D-3, as The Acton Veterans Memorial Recreation Area in Commemoration of all Acton 
Veterans who have served their Country in the time of war. 

RESOLVED: That the Town Meeting take a moment of silent tribute to the memory of Richard S.' McCabe, 
former Town Counsel to the Town, and an active and informed member of this Town Meeting for many years. 

VOTED: That Articles 15 to 24 be deferred to the next session of this meeting. 

, Article 25. SIDEWALK 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500.00 for the construction of the trunk sidewalk system. 

VOTED: To complete article under discussion at 11:00 P. M. and adjourn to Monday, March 20, 1967 at 
7:30 P. M. 

Article 26. TOWN ADMINISTRATION STUDY COMMITTEE 

VOTED: To authorize the Moderator to appoint a comnaittee of five members to be known as the Town 
Administration Study Committee, said committee to be chosen in the following manner for terms of two 
years each: one member from the Finance Committee, one member from the Planning Board, one member 
from the Personnel Board and two members at large. The Committee is charged with studying the fiscal 

72 



and administrative structure of the Town and to make specific recommendations, which in the judgment of 
the Committee will tend to improve the administration of Town Government, and to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $400.00 for the use of said Committee. 

Article 2 7. SCHOOL ZONE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00, to establish a School Zone on Mass- 
achusetts Avenue at the intersection of Charter Road. 

Article 28. RECREATIONAL WATER FACILITY 

MOTION: To raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000.00 to be expended by the Recreation Commission, for 
the purpose of developing a recreational water facility in the Town. 

MOTION: To amend original motion by striking out $5,000.00 and inserting $2,000.00. 

ORIGINAL MOTION LOST. 

ADJOURNED at 11:03 P. M. 

Monday, March 20, 1967. Moderator called meeting to order at 7:35 P. M. 

Article 10. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of constructing, originally equipping 
and furnishing an elementary school to be located on land of the Town off Spruce Street; to see how any such 
appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer of available revenue funds in the treasury, by 
borrowing or otherwise, and if by borrowing, to authorize the issuance and sale of bonds or notes of the 
Town; to see whether the Town will authorize the Town Building Committee, or any other committee, or 
person, to enter into contracts in the name of and on behalf of the Town to construct, originally equip and 
furnish the said school; or to take any action incidental to or connected with the foregoing matters or any of 
them. 

VOTED: (1) That there is hereby authorized the construction, originally equipping and furnishing of an 
elementary school building to contain approximately twenty classrooms as well as other necessary rooms 
and facilities to be located on land of the Town on Elm Street; 

(2) That the sum of $1,349,450 is hereby appropriated for the purpose of constructing, originally 
equipping and furnishing said elementary school and other costs incidental thereto and connected therewith 
and to meet said appropriation the sum of $100,000 is to be transferred from the Stabilization Fund; and the 
Treasurer be and hereby is authorized to borrow the sum of $1,249,450 under the authority of Chapter 645 
of the Acts of 1945, as amended, and to issue at one time or from time to time bonds of the Town therefor 
payable in accordance with the applicable provisions of Chapter 44 of the General Laws, each such issue of 
bonds to be paid in not more than 2 years from its date of issue, provided, however, that if and to the extent 
a construction grant for said school project from the Commonwealth under the provisions of Chapter 591 of 
the Acts of 1959, as amended, or any other enabling authority, is received prior to the sale of all of the bonds 
hereinbefore authorized, the proceeds of such grant shall be applied to the cost of the project in lieu of the 
proceeds from bonds and the amount of the total loan hereinbefore authorized shall be reduced accordingly; 

(3) That the Building Committee of the Town of Acton acting for and on behalf of the Town shall 
have full power and authority to construct, originally equip and furnish said elementary school building 
including power and authority to make necessary contracts for and to have charge and supervision of said 
construction of said elementary school building, to hire architects and engineers and to take any other action 
necessary to carry said school project to completion. 

TOTAL VOTE - 358; Yes - 281; No - 77: 2/3 Needed - 238 

Article 15. SEWERAGE DISPOSAL 

To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Health to require every sewerage disposal system (septic tank 
and cesspool) to be pumped once every two years, except in those instances in which the Board of Health 
determines that because of special circumstances such pumping is not necessary or is necessary less often 
than every two years, and to see what penalty shall be imposed for non-compliance with the requirement, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

MOTION: That the Board of Health be authorized to require every sewerage disposal system (septic tank 
and cesspool) to be pumped once every two years except in those instances in which the Board of Health 
determines that because of special circumstances such pumping is not necessary or is necessary less often 
than every two years, and to impose a penalty of not more than $25.00 for non-compliance with the require- 
ment. 

MOTION LOST. 



73 



Article 16. SEWAGE DISPOSAL 

To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Health to provide engineering consulting services to assess 
individual sewage disposal problems and to authorize the Board of Health to implement a program whereby a 
home -owner may obtain at no cost to him, an evaluation and an appraisal of his individual sewage disposal 
problem so that such a home -owner may effect such repairs or construction on said sewerage disposal sys- 
tem under the supervision of the Board of Health, and to see if the Town will raise and appropriate from 
available funds, the sum of $10,000.00, or any other sum, to be used therefor by the Board of Health to defray 
part or all of the cost of such appraisal of any such individual sewerage disposal system, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

MOTION: That the Board of Health be authorized to provide engineering advisory services to assess indi- 
vidual sewage disposal problems in the Town; that the Board of Health be further authorized to establish and 
carry out a program under which upon request of a landowner with an individual sewerage disposal problem 
the Board of Health may furnish the landowner with a free, written evaluation of the problem so that any 
repairs or construction on the system can be undertaken within the requirements of the Board of Health and 
with knowledge of its recommendations; and that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 
therefor. 

MOTION LOST-. 

Article 17. SEWERAGE COMMISSION 

MOTION: To create a five-man Sewerage Commission to be appointed by the Board of Selectmen, said com- 
mission to undertake the supervision of the design and construction of a sewerage system and to recommend 
to the Board of Selectmen, no later than January 1, 1969, an operational plan for the sewerage system. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 18. SEWERAGE SYSTEM 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the sum of $170,000.00, or any other sum, to be used for con- 
struction plans, specifications, cost estimates, and related contract bid documents for an initial phase of a 
sewerage system which includes a sewerage treatment plant and related effluent outfall line, pump station, 
force main, interceptor, main sewer, and lateral sewers, more fully described as Phase 1 in the Report to 
Sewerage Study Committee, Acton, Massachusetts, upon Proposed Sewerage System for the Town of Acton, 
Massachusetts, dated June 1966, by Metcalf and Eddy, Engineers, said documents to be rendered by an 
engineer selected and employed by the Sewerage 'Commission, said funds or so much thereof that may be 
required, to be received by and administered by the Town Treasurer under the direction of the Sewerage 
Commission, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 

Article 19. SEWERAGE SYSTEM 

To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of $1,200,000.00 for the purpose of constructing the initial phase 
of a sewerage system which includes a sewerage treatment plant and related effluent outfall line, pump sta- 
tion, force main, interceptor, main sewer and lateral sewers, more fully described as Phase 1 in the Report 
to Sewerage Study Committee, Acton, Massachusetts, upon Proposed Sewerage System for the Town of 
Acton, Massachusetts, dated June 1966, by Metcalf and Eddy, Engineers, and authorize the Treasurer with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow said sum under the authority of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
8, Clause 15, and to issue at one time or froro. time to time notes or bonds of the Town therefor, payable 
according to the applicable provisions of said Chapter 44, each such issue of notes or bonds to be paid in not 
more than 30 years from its date or to take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 

Article 20. SEWERAGE COMMISSION 

To see if the Town will authorize the Sewerage Commission to make application to the United State of 
America under the provisions of Public Law 660 of the 84th Congress, as amended, for the maximum avail- 
able grant to assist in meeting the construction cost of the initial phase of sewerage system, including the 
cost of the treatment plant, lift stations, and main interceptor sewers, said funds, if and when received, to 
be administered by the Town Treasurer under tHe direction of the Sewerage Commission, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 



74 



Article 21. SEWERAGE COMMISSION 

To see if the Town will authorize the Sewerage Commission to make application to the United State of 
America, under the provisions of Public Law 89-117, 89th Congress, as amended, for the maximum grant 
of funds to assist in meeting that portion of the construction cost of the initial phase of public sewer facil- 
ities of the Town which is not covered by Public Law 660, 84th Congress, said funds, if and when received, 
to be administered by the Town Treasurer under the direction of the Sewerage Commission, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 

Article 22. SEWERAGE COMMISSION 

To see if the Town will authorize the Sewerage Commission to make application to the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts under the provisions of Chapter 687 of the Acts of 1966 for the maximum available grant to 
assist in meeting the construction cost of the initial phase of a sewerage system, including the cost of the 
treatment plant, lift stations, and main interceptor sewers, said funds, if and when received, to be admin- 
istered by the Town Treasurer under the direction of the Sewerage Commission, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 

Article 23. SEWERAGE DISPOSAL 

To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, or otherwise acquire 
for the Town for sewerage disposal purposes all or a portion of a parcel of land in the Southerly part of the 
Town believed to belong to John Lord and others, trustees, said parcel being shown as parcel 33, sheet J-3 
of the Town Atlas, bounded as follows: 

Northerly by Parker Street and Adams Street, 

Easterly by High Street and land now or formerly of Thomas Ewart, 

Southerly by the Assabet River, and 

Westerly by land of the Town of Maynard and the Acton- Maynard town line, 

and to see if the Town will raise and appropriate, appropriate from available funds or by borrowings under 
the General Laws, the sum of $50,000.00 or any other sum, therefor, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or otherwise acquire for 
sewerage disposal purposes a parcel of land believed to beloitg to Charles Lord and others, trustees, and 
shown as parcel 33, sheet J-3 of the Town Atlas, being all of the land bounded northerly and easterly by 
Parker, Adams and High Streets, southerly by the Assabet River and westerly by the Acton- Maynard town 
line with the exception of (1) the land described as parcel 3 in a deed from the American Powder Company 
to the Town of Maynard recorded with Middlesex South Registry of Deeds, Book 5267, Page 364 and (2) the 
land described in a deed from Charles E. D. Fletcher to Thomas Ewart recorded with Middlesex South 
Registry of Deeds, Book 7722, Page 90, and that the Town, for the purpose of acquiring this land and for 
any other expenses incidental thereto, appropriate the sum of $31,000.00 from the current tax levy. 

TOTAL VOTE - 406. Yes - 367; No - 39; Needed - 271. 

VOTED: To complete article under discussion at 11:00 P. M. and adjourn to Monday, March 27, 1967 at 
7:30 P. M. 

Article 24. SEWERAGE DISPOSAL 

To see if the Town will determine to pay the whole or any portion of the cost of laying out and constructing 
main sewerage drains and of the system of sewerage and sewage disposal, and, if only a portion, what por- 
tion is to be paid by the Town, and in providing for the payment of the remaining portion of the cost of said 
system, to determine what method or methods of payment authorized by law will be used, as provided with 
respect to sewer assessments in Chapter 83 of the General Laws or elsewhere in the General Laws, and to 
see what other action the Town may wish to take with respect to sewer assessments, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take no action. 

Article 2 9. CHAIN LINK FENCE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $810.00 for the purchase and installation of 
three hundred feet of chain link fence, to be located at Gardiner Field. 

Article 30. TENNIS COURTS 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $12,000.00 for the construction and equipping of two doubles 
tennis courts 



75 



Article 31. UNPAID BILLS 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $4,243.03, 
or any other sum, to pay the following unpaid 1966 bills: 

New England Traffic Safety Lines $1, 699. 30 

Lowell Iron and Steel Company 15. 38 

Files Equipment Company 111. 65 

G. Waldo Livermore ' 230. 16 

C. N. Wood Co., Inc. 375. 90 
Eastern Minerals, Inc. 1,089.08 

Hydraulics Company 116.00 

Globe Rubber Works, Inc. 19.42 

Brockway Motor Trucks 6. 00 

Becker Auto Supply Company 1. 84 

Field Machinery Conapany 3. 36 

International Harvester Company 7. 68 

S. P. Andelman, Inc. 40.00 

Leo S. Cavelier, Inc. 2.64 

Plasticrete Boston Corporation 5. 17 
Bursaw Gas and Oil $ 343. 50 

The Center Store 9. 97 

Baker Oil Company, Inc. 165. 98 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $4,243.03 to pay the unpaid 1966 bills set 
forth in Article 31. 

Article 32. EMERGENCY CENTER 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 for the purpose of obtaining plans to modify a base- 
ment area in the Elm Street School as an Emergency Operating Center. 

ADJOURNED at 11:03 P. M. 

Monday, March 27, 1967. Moderator called meeting to order at 7:40 P. M. 

MOTION: To reconsider Item 3 9 of Article 5. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 33. BUILDING COMMITTEE 

VOTED: To increase the membership on the Permanent Building Committee from four to five members. 

Article 34. HAARTZ PROPERTY 

To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or otherwise 
acquire for the use of the Highway Department and other Town agencies, 6 acres, more or less, indicated in 
the Town Atlas as part of parcel 1, sheet F-3, with the building thereon, now owned by Haartz Auto Fabric 
Co., and a right of way from Hayward Road to the aforesaid parcel over other land owned by Haartz Auto 
Fabric Co., and to raise and appropriate $90,000.00, or any other sum, for such acquisition, including the 
expenses of the acquisition, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 35. STATE PROPERTY 

To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or otherwise 
acquire for municipal buildings for the Highway Department and other Town agencies, 6 acres, more or less, 
between Charter Road and Route 2 indicated in the Town Atlas as parcel 93, sheet E-3, and now owned by 
Porter G. Jenks, and a right of way from Hayward Road to the aforesaid parcel over land now owned by 
Haartz Auto Fabric Co., and to raise and appropriate $35,000.00, or any other sum, for such acquisition, 
including the expenses of the acquisition, or take any other action relative thereto. 

MOTION: To authorize the Board of Selectmen and committees or agencies designated by said Board to 
negotiate with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the acquisition of nine acres, more or less, desig- 
nated in the Town Atlas as parcels 93 and 85, sheet E-3; to negotiate with the Haartz Auto Fabric Company 
for a right of way thereto; and to prepare such data for presentation at a future town meeting, not later than 
the 1968 Annual Town Meeting, as will enable the townspeople to vote on acquiring the land and a right of 
way and constructing thereon a complete municipal facility for the use of the Highway Department and other 
Town agencies. 

MOTION LOST. 

7 6 



Article 36. LAND 

To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire for conservation and recreation purposes 
land near Arlington Street, by exercising the Town's option contained in an option agreement between Porter 
G. Jenks and the Town dated September 4, 1962, and to see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appro- 
priate from available funds, the sum of $43,750.00, or any other sum, therefor, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

MOTION: To take affirmative action under Article 36 and to raise and appropriate $43,750.00 therefor. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 37. VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $7,000.00, or 
any other sum, for the payment of vocational tuition and transportation according to the provisions of Chapter 
74 of the General Laws, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $7,000.00 for the payment of vocational tuition 
and transportation according to the provisions of Chapter 74 of the General Laws. 

Article 38. FOREST FIRE TRUCK 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $30,000.00, 
or any other sum, to replace the Forest Fire truck at Acton Center, or take any other action relative thereto. 

MOTION: To raise and appropriate the sum of $30,000.00 to replace the Forest Fire truck at Acton Center. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 3 9. TREE DEPARTMENT TRUCK 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $3,-000.00, 
or any other sum, for the purchase of a new truck, cab and chassis for the Tree Department, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action under Article 3 9. 

Article 40. CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

To see if the Town will authorize the Conservation Commission to contract in the name of the Town with any 
agency of the U. S. Government in order to obtain financial assistance for the purchase of open space land, 
and to receive and expand Federal funds for such purposes, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Conservation Commission to contract in the name of the Town with 
any agency of the U. S. Government in order to obtain financial assistance for the purchase of open space land, 
and to receive and expend Federal funds for such purposes. 

Article 41. LAND 

To see if the Town will authorize the purchase by the Conservation Commission for the Town of approxi- 
mately 27.7 acres, located in the northerly porlfion of the Town (identified in the Town Atlas as parcel 30, 
sheet D-5 and parcel 7, sheet E-5) using funds from the Conservation Fund and further to see if the Town 
will approve application by the Conservation Commission for reimbursement from the Commonwealth under 
General Laws, Chapter 132 A, Section 11, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To take affirmative action under Article 41. 

Article 42. CONSERVATION FUND 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $25,000.00 
for the Conservation Fund, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $25,000.00 for the Conservation Fund. 

Article 43. TRAIL - RICHMOND 

To see if the Town will accept the grant to it of an easemant from Winthrop C. Richmond, by instrument 
dated June 22, 1965, said easement being for the purpose of a foot passage in connection with historic observ- 
ances held on April 10 and July 4 of each year or on such days as may in the future be designated for the 
retracing of the Line of March of the Acton Minutemen over The Captain Isaac Davis Trail. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take affirmative action under Article 43. 

77 



Article 44. COUNCIL ON AGING 

To see if the Town will amend its Bylaws by adding thereto a new section to read as follows: 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

SECTION 9 

There is hereby established a Council on Aging for the purpose of coordinating or 
carrying out programs designed to meet the problems of the aging in coordination 
with programs of the Commission on Aging established under General Laws, 
Chapter 6, Section 73. 

The Council shall be appointed by the Board of Selectmen. It shall consist of one 
representative from the Board of Health, the School Committee and the Recreation 
Commission and four additional members selected at large. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take affirmative action under Article 44. 

Article 45. COUNCIL ON AGING 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $200.00, or 
any other sum, for the use of the Council on Aging in determining the needs of the Aged in Acton, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $200.00 for the use of the Coimcil on Aging. 

Article 46. WALDEN CLINIC 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $4,000.00, 
or any other sum, to be expended under the direction of the Board of Health for providing cooperative or 
complementary facilities to the out-patient clinic of the Walden Guidance Association, Inc. established in 
accordance with the provisions of Chapter 123 of the General Laws, in cooperation with the Department of 
Mental Health and for providing payment for services rendered or to be rendered by such clinic, and will 
join with other communities in providing payment for services rendered or to be rendered by such clinic, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take affirmative action under Article 46 and to raise and appropriate $4,000.00 
therefor. 

Article 47. ZONING BYLAW 

To determine if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Acton, by adding 
the following sub-section (i) to Article IV (B) (2): 

i. Recreational facilities, not otherwise permitted for outdoor swimming, tennis, ice 
skating, baseball, football, and playgrounds. 

The Board of Appeals, before issuing any permit hereunder shall determine that the 
facility will in no way be used for business or profit; that its construction and use 
will not substantially detract from the residential value and appearance of the neighbor- 
hood; and that it will be under the control and supervision of at least one resident of 
the Town. Further, the Board may impose any reasonable conditions or restrictions 
regarding the construction and use of such facility as it shall deem to be in the best 
interests of the abutting landowners and the Town. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Acton by adding the following sub-section 
(i) to Article IV (B) (2): 

i. Outdoor recreational facilities, not otherwise permitted, for swimming, tennis, ice 
skating, baseball, football, and playgrounds. 

The Board of Appeals, before issuing any permit hereunder shall determine that the 
facility will in no way be used for business or profit and that its construction and use 
will not substantially detract from the residential value and appearance of the neigh- 
borhood. Further, the Board may impose any reasonable conditions or restrictions 
regarding the construction and use of such facility as it shall deem to be in the best 
interests of the abutting landowners and the Town. 

TOTAL VOTE - 227. Yes -215; No -12: Needed- 152. 

78 



Article 48. TRUCK FOR CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $2,600.00, 
or any other sum, for the purchase of one-half (j) ton truck for the Cemetery Department, and authorize 
the Cemetery Commissioners to purchase the same, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,675.00 for the purchase of one one-half 
ton truck for the Cemetery Department and authorize the Cemetery Commissioners to purchase the same. 

Article 49. CEMETERY LAND FUND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 from the Cemetery Land Fund for Woodlawn 
Cemetery, for the purpose of clearing, grading and laying out new sections for cemetery lots and author- 
ize the Cemetery Commissioners to do anything necessary, proper or expedient for carrying out the above 
purposes. 

Article 50. LAND FOR CEMETERY 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $1,000.00, 
and authorize the Cemetery Commissioners to purchase for the Town for cemetery purposes a tract of land 
with all rights appurtenant thereto, said land belonging to George W. Larrabee of Acton, said land consist- 
ing of approximately eight and one-half acres, situated northerly of Woodlawn Cemetery, as shown on the 
Town Atlas, sheet F-4, parcel #32, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Cemetery Commissioners to purchase, take by eminent domain 
or otherwise acquire for cemetery purposes a certain parcel of land, containing about eight and one-half 
acres, believed to belong to George W. Larrabee, situated northerly of the Woodlawn Cemetery, and shown 
as parcel 32, sheet F-4 of the Town Atlas, which parcel is substantially all the land described in a deed from 
Ethel R. Robbins to George W. Larrabee by deed recorded with Middlesex Registry of Deeds, Book 9499, 
Page 83 and that the Town, for the purposes of acquiring this land and for any other expenses incidental 
thereto, appropriate the sum of $1,250.00 from the current tax levy. 

Article 51. RESERVE FUND 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $2 0,000.00, 
or any other sum, for a Reserve Fund, pursuant to the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 
6, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate the sum of $20,000.00 for a Reserve Fund, $10,000.00 to be appro- 
priated from the Surplus Revenue and $10,000.00 to be appropriated from Overlay Surplus Reserve. 

Article 52. FREE CASH 

To see if the Town will appropriate and transfer a sum of money from Free Cash to be used by the Assessors 
in considering and fixing the tax rate for the current year, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate and transfer the sum of $70,000.00 from Free Cash to be used by 
the Assessors in considering and fixing the 1967 tax rate. 

VOTED; To adjourn at 10:30 P. M. 



A true copy. Attest: Charles M. MacRae 

Town Clerk 



79 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, NOVEMBER 13. 1967 



Article 1. 



VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: That the Town, pursuant to Chapter 401 of the Acts of 1966, include within 
the terms "laborers, workmen and mechanics" as used in sections sixty-eight to seventy-five of the 
workmen's compensation act, such elected or appointed officials other than the selectmen or members 
of the police and fire force, as the Board of Selectmen may from time to time designate. 

Article 2. CEMETERY DEPARTMENT EXPENSE ACCOUNT 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To transfer from the Insurance Claim Recovery Fund to the Cemetery 
Department expense account the sum of $135.00. 

Article 3. CHAIN LINK FENCE 

VOTED: To appropriate from Free Cash the sum of $10,000.00 for a permanent chain link fence to be 
installed around the Town Forest sewage disposal site and to provide site improvements. 

Article 4. PERSONNEL CONSULTANT 

VOTED: To appropriate from the Overlay Surplus Reserve Fund the sum of $2,000 to enable the 
Personnel Board to engage a consultant to review, revise and update, where necessary, the job and 
position descriptions for those positions described in Section 1 of the Personnel Bylaw. 

Articles. LAND ACQUISITION 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, or other- 
wise acquire for school purposes a tract of land on Minot Avenue and Taylor Road being a portion of 
a tract, believed to be owned by Malcolm R. Dunn and Judith V. Dunn, said parcel being further 
described as the land owned by Malcolm R. Dunn and Judith V. Dunn lying northerly of a line beginning 
on Taylor Road at the southwesterly corner of lot 16 as shown on a plan entitled "Land in Acton owned 
by Malcolm R. Dunn and Judith V. Dunn, " dated June 2, 1956, and running 160 feet to the southeasterly 
corner of said lot 16 as shown on said plan, thence running southeasterly in a straight line to the inter- 
section of two ditches, being the northwesterly property corner of a parcel now or formerly owned by 
James and Marion Edney, and thence running southeasterly along a ditch to the end of the Dunn prop- 
erty, but excluding lot 21 as shown on said plan of June 2, 1956 and a parcel bounded by said lot 21, 
by Taylor Road, by Minot Avenue and by lot E, as shown on a plan entitled "Land in Acton owned by 
Malcolm R. Dunn and Judith V. Dunn, " dated January 17, 1957, and that the sum of $79,000 be appro- 
priated from Free Cash for the purpose of acquiring this land and for any expenses incidental thereto. 

Article 6. PUBLIC ASSISTANCE 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $15,000.00, 
or any other sum, for public assistance from the Town through its welfare department, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 7. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept a portion of Heritage Road constructed under the requirements of the 
Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town 
Clerk as follows: 

Heritage Road, in Heritage Farms Subdivision from Station 12+50 in a westerly and northeasterly 
direction 1590 feet ± to Station 28+40.46, thereby creating a continuous public way from School 
Street to School Street 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said 
plans . 

Articles. STREET ACCEPTANCE 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the following street constructed under the requirements of the 
Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the 
Town Clerk as follows: 

All of Vanderbelt Road, in Chadwick Park Subdivision, from River Street 1108 feet ± in a north- 
easterly and southeasterly direction to the southeasterly sideline of a 62.5 foot radius cul-de-sac 

80 



including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said 
plans. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 9. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept a portion of Musket Drive constructed under the requirements of 
the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the 
Town Clerk as follows: 

Musket Drive, in Isaac Davis Park Subdivision from Main Street 857 feet ± in a northwesterly- 
direction to Station 8 + 56.59 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said 
plans . 

Article 10. STREET ACCEPTANCE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept portions of the following streets constructed under the requirements 
of the Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with 
the Town Clerk as follows: 

Musket Drive, in Patriots Hill Subdivision, Section III, from Station 16 + 39.88 in a northerly 
direction 358 feet ± to the southerly sideline of Washington Drive, thereby creating a contin- 
uous public way from Main Street to Washington Drive. Washington Drive 1975 feet ± in a 
westerly and northwesterly direction to Station 42 + 37.35 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said 
plans. 

Article 11. STREET ACCEPTANCE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the following street constructed under the requirements of the 
Subdivision Control Law and as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the 
Town Clerk as follows: 

Capt. Forbush Lane, in Minuteman Ridge Subdivision from Capt. Brown's Lane in a northerly 
direction 1370 feet ± to Joseph Reed Lane, thereby creating a continuous public way from 
Capt. Brown's Lane to Joseph Reed Lane 

including the takings or acceptance of easements for drainage or other purposes where shown on said 
plans . 

Article 12. HIGHWAY MACHINERY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate the sum of $1,200.00 for the purchase of a used dump body 
for the Highway Department and to meet said appropriation the sum of $1,200.00 be transferred from 
the Machinery Fund. 

VOTED THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION: That Judith Dunn and Malcolm Dunn be commended for 
their generosity and fine spirit of civic pride and responsibility in offering land to the Town for school 
purposes at far below market value. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 9:00 P.M. 



A true copy. Attest: Charles M. MacRae 

Town Clerk 



81 



82 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



The reports which are submitted herewith represent a statement of the cash 
disbursements authorized during the year ended December 31, 1967, and a Balance Sheet 
of the Town of Acton as at December 31, 1957. 

The 1958 amortization of bonded indebtedness of the Town, and Acton's share of the 
Regional School District bond amortization are: 

Schools : 

Julia McCarthy Elementary School $ 15,000.00 

Florence Merriam Elementary School 40,000.00 

Elm Street Elementary School 40,000.00 

Spruce Street Elementary School 50,000.00 

Regional School District 51, 261 . 05 

Total Schools 205,261.05 

Police Station 20,000.00 

Acton Memorial Library Addition 25,000.00 

Amortization of bonded indebtedness $251, 261 . 05 

The accounts of the Treasurer, Collector and Manager of the School Cafeteria have 
been verified, and I have reviewed the various trust funds in the custody of the 
Treasurer and Trustees. 



ROBERT J, ERICKSON 

STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS AND CASH DISBURSEMENTS 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1965 

Appropriated 

or Cash 

Available Disbursed Balance 

General Government: 
Moderator: 
Salary 
Expenses 

Finance Committee: 
Expenses 

Selectmen: 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Legal services 

Legal services expenses 

Appraisals 

Town Office Clerical Staff: 
Salaries 

Engineering Department: 
Salaries and wages 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

Accountant: 
Salary 
Expenses 



150.00 
25.00 


$ 


80.00 
7.00 


$ 80.00 
18.00 


200.00 




127.00 


73.00 


10,050.00 

5,075.00 

7,000.00 

500.00 

1,000.00 


2 
5 
7 


,050.00 

,065.85 

,000.00 

215.34 

200.00 


8,000.00 
9.15 

284.66 
800.00 


42,394.00 


38 


885.81 


3,507.19 


13,759.00 


13 


735.48 


22.52 


2,400.00 
200.00 


2 


388.70 
200.00 


11.30 


2,300.00 
250.00 


2 


300.00 
142.41 


107.59 



83 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 



Cash 
Disbursed 



Balance 



General Government - continued: 

Treasurer - Collector: 
Salary 
Expenses 

Assessors : 

Salaries 
Expenses 

Clerk: 



Salary 
Expenses 

Elections and Registrations: 
Salaries and wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Planning Board: 
Expenses 
Guarantee deposits - 

Available from 1966 

Cash received 1967 

Personnel Board: 
Expenses 

Board of Appeals; 
Expenses 
Guarantee deposits - 

Available from 1966 

Cash received 1967 

Industrial Development Commission: 
Expenses 

Conservation Commission: 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Transfer from Conservation Fund 

Archives Committee: 
Expenses 

Public Ceremonies and Celebration Committee: 
Expenses 

Buildings and Grounds: 
Salaries and wages 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 
Capital outlay 

Town Report Committee: 
Expenses 

Total General Government: 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 
Available from 1966 
Cash received 1967 
Transfer from Conservation Fund 



$ 7,541.00 


$ 7,541.00 


$ 


- 


. 3,500.00 


3,486.69 




13.31 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 






2,269.00 


1,405.78 




863.22 


2,310.00 


2,310.00 






800.00 


694.36 




105.64 


2,500.00 


2,032.76 




467.24 


2,500.00 


1,225.58 


1 


,274.42 


2,200.00 


- 


2 


,200.00 


1,000.00 


155.13 




844.87 


352.25 


352.25 




_ 


75.00 


7 5.00 




- 


1,300.00 


35.00 


1 


,265.00 



55.00 



200.00 
733.00 



25.00 



1,250.00 



4,835.00 

24,178.00 

600.00 

2,210.00 



3,000.00 



151,036.00 
800.00 
415.75 
195.00 
733.00 

153.179.75 



15.00 



199,35 
733.00 



18.50 



1,247.35 



4,827.34 

19,739.60 

600.00 

2,131.30 



2,615.85 



125,880.18 

800.00 

415.75 

92.85 

733.00 

127.921.78 



40.00 



63.50 


63.50 


- 


120.00 


17.85 


102.15 


250.00 


_ 


250.00 



.65 

6.50 

2.65 

7.66 

4,438.40 

78.70 

384.15 
25,155.82 

102.15 
25.257.97 



84 



Appropriated 
or 

Available 



Cash 
Disbursed 



Balance 



Protection of Persons and Property: 
Police Department: 

Salaries and wages 
Expenses 

Capital outlay - 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 

Fire Department: 

Salaries and wages 
Expenses 
Capital outlay 

Sealer of Weights and Measures: 
Salary and travel 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

Insect Pest Control: 
Wages 
Expenses 

Town Forest Committee: 
Maintenance 

Tree Department: 
Wages 
Expenses 

Wire Inspector: 

Wages and travel 
Expenses 

Inspector of Gas Piping and Appliances: 
Wages - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 



$ 97,591.00 


$ 94 


227.10 


$ 3,363.90 


13,787.00 


13 


137.45 


649.55 


1,300.00 


1 


248.00 


52.00 


2,950.00 


2 


950.00 


- 


94,009.00 


92 


323.39 


1,685.61 


40,625.00 


40 


614.19 


10.81 


1,250.00 


1 


248.00 


2,. 00 


450.00 




450.00 


- 


40.00 




40.00 


_ 


8.78 




8.78 


- 


3,915.00 


3, 


911.11 


3.89 


2,000.00 


1, 


899.17 


100.83 



100.00 



91.04 



8.96 



3,610.00 


3,588.53 


21.47 


1,900.00 


1,834.41 


65.59 


3,000.00 


2,891.25 


108.75 


25.00 


18.50 


6.50 



1,500.00 
300,00 



1,472.50 
300,00 



27.50 



Building Inspector and Agent for 
Enforcement of Zoning By-Laws: 
Wages 
Expenses 

Dog Officer: 

Wages and travel 
Expenses 

Building Committee: 
Expenses 
Capital outlay 

Civil Defense: 
Expenses 

Total Protection of Persons and Property: 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 



7,734.00 


7 


706,40 


27.60 


1,200.00 


1 


083.10 


116.90 


579.00 




579.00 




75.00 




50.00 


25.00 


50.00 




16.65 


33.35 


100.00 




- 


100.00 


400.00 




304.70 


95.30 


275,240.00 


268 


734.49 


6,505.51 


3,258.78 


3 
271 


258.78 
993.27 


- 


278,498.78 


6,505.51 



85 



Appropriated 

or 

Available 



Cash 
Disbursed 



Balance 



Highways : 

General Highway Maintenance - 
Salaries - 

Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

Street lighting 

Capital outlay 

Total Highways: 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 



Health and Sanitation: 

Health and sanitation: 
Salaries 
Expenses 

Garbage collection - 
Appropriated 
Reserve fund transfer 

Inspector of animals: 
Wages 
Expenses 

Plumbing inspector: 
Wages - 

Appropriated 

Reserve fund transfer 

Total Health and Sanitation: 
A